Journal of Small Business Management

Articles from Vol. 30, No. 2, April

AIDS in the Workplace: Current Practices and Critical Issues
Experts at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) believe that every U.S. company will have at least one employee with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) at some point. Some experts have even predicted that AIDS will become the number one...
An Empirical Analysis of Small Business Advertising
Selecting the most appropriate advertising media is usually difficult for small businesses. The normal objective is to reach potential customers using the most cost-effective methods available. Jackson and Parasuraman (1988) note that small firms confronted...
Antecedents and Propensity for Diversification: A Focus on Small Banks
Due to the changing regulatory, economic, technological, social, and competitive environments, diversification strategies have proliferated among large U.S. banking institutions during the 1980s. To compete successfully in the 1990s, small community...
Characterizing Profitable and Unprofitable Strategies in Small and Large Businesses
The study of normative prescriptions for successful strategic management has focused, in part, on the content of strategies reflecting how resources are allocated within organizations (e.g., asset intensity, debt burden, and advertising intensity)....
Incremental Decision Making in Small Manufacturing Firms
During the past decade, Japanese and other foreign firms have successfully developed innovative product technology and production systems; they also have gradually taken over many of the leadership positions previously held by U.S. firms. In reaction,...
Meeting the Wrongful Discharge Challenge: Legislative Options for Small Business
The employment-at-will doctrine, which holds that an employer can terminate employees for good reasons, bad reasons, or no reasons at all, was long considered an employer's property right. However, the employer-employee relationship has changed noticeably...
Secondary Analysis in Entrepreneurship: An Introduction to Databases and Data Management
"Low-barrier-to-entry (LBE) research" is a term derived from Northwestern University's Denise Rousseau's efforts (1987) to describe research methods that rely on inexpensive or free-to-the-researcher techniques. Examples of LBE approaches for entrepreneurship...
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