Foreign Language Annals

Foreign Language Annals is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1967. It is published by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. The journal is dedicated to the advancement of foreign language teaching and learning. It has a circulation of about 11,000 subscribers, most of whom are foreign language instructors. The publication is edited by Leslie L. Schrier with the help of managing editor, Jennifer Henriquez.

Articles from Vol. 41, No. 2, Summer

Calendar
JUNEJune 20-28, 2008Center for Advanced Language Proficiency Education and Research (CALPER) Summer Workshops: "Projects in Foreign Language Courses," June 20; "Language Portfolios," June 21; "Investigating Real Language" and "New Technologies for Language...
Examining Our Collective Progress
In May 2007, the Modern Language Association (MLA) published a report titled "Foreign Languages and Higher Education: New Structures for a Changed World." A year later, I find myself reflecting on this report as the Editor of Foreign Language Annals...
Foreign Language Learning and SAT Verbal Scores Revisited
Abstract:The purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship between foreign language learning and verbal ability in English as measured by the verbal section of the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) Reasoning Test. Comparing foreign language students...
Instructors' Use of English in the Modern Language Classroom
Abstract:Contemporary best practices in the profession encourage teaching as much as possible in the target language, but when university faculty were observed teaching Spanish, the majority spoke English during instruction and many engaged in frequent...
Integrating Focus on Form in L2 Content-Enriched Instruction Lessons
Abstract:The model of content-enriched instruction focuses on the integration of grammatical and lexical forms within content to beginning-level learners (Ballman, 1997). This study used quantitative data to examine the efficiency and application of...
Our Biggest Challenge
Some might say that the biggest challenge facing language educators is convincing the general public that language learning is important. However, I would suggest that an even higher priority is to define what it means to "learn" a second language.Consider...
Podcasting Communities and Second Language Pronunciation
Abstract:Although often neglected in language classrooms, second language phonology is a crucial element in language learning because it is often the most salient feature in the speech of a foreigner. As instructors, we must decide how to emphasize pronunciation...
The Japanese Skills Test as an On-Demand Placement Test: Validity Comparisons and Reliability
Abstract:This study and analysis are designed to find a common, practical measurement tool that may be used for intra- and interprogram evaluation of Japanese programs, especially in the higher education context. First, three previous methods of evaluation...
The Linguistic Similarities of Spanish Heritage and Second Language Learners
Abstract:This article addresses the situation of lower-proficiency heritage language learners of Spanish in terms of their linguistic similarities to second language learners. The analysis highlights grammatical and lexical features in the oral discourse...
The Overwhelmed Generation and Foreign Language Teacher Preparation: Developing Strategies to Work with the Mental Health Challenges of Preservice Teachers
Abstract:For the last two decades the foreign language education profession has spent considerable energy establishing professional guidelines for foreign language teacher preparation. This article discusses research that suggests that the profession...
The Role of Structural Position in L2 Phonological Acquisition: Evidence from English Learners of Spanish as L2
Abstract:In this pilot study, the speech of 12 adult native speakers of English with intermediate to intermediate-high proficiency in Spanish as a second language (L2) was analyzed to determine whether L2 learners rely on distributional information in...
Why Learning to Write Chinese Is a Waste of Time: A Modest Proposal
Abstract:This article argues that for students of Chinese and Japanese, learning to write Chinese characters (hanzi/kanji) by hand from memory is an inefficient use of resources. Rather, beginning students should focus on character/word recognition (reading)...
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