Current Musicology

Articles

No. 89, Spring

Publications Received
Ashby, Arved. 2010. Absolute Music, Mechanical Reproduction. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press. Axford, Elizabeth C. 2009. Song Sheets to Software: A Guide to Print Music, Software, Instructional Media, and Web Sites for Musicians....
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Editors' Note
Welcome to issue 89 of Current Musicology, the first publication of our forty-fifth year. This journal primarily provides space for peer-reviewed articles by scholars in the early stages of their careers. We take an inclusive approach to musicology,...
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A Message for Peace or a Tool for Oppression? Israeli Jewish-Arab Duo Achinoam Nini and Mira Awad's Representation of Israel at Eurovision 2009
Israel's contenders for the 2009 Eurovision Song Contest (known as the ESC or, as here, Eurovision) were the Israeli Jewish-Arab duo Achinoam Nini and Mira Awad. The chosen song was "There Must Be Another Way," a tri-lingual appeal for peace and reconciliation...
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Music Smashed to Pieces: The Destructive Logic of Berlioz's Romeo Au Tombeau
Berlioz's Romeo au tombeau des Capulets, the sixth movement of his symphony Romeo et Juliette, is arguably his most controversial programmatic work and one of the most baffling pieces of program music in the repertoire. When the symphony premiered...
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Solving Elgar's Enigma
On June 19, 1899, Elgar's opus 36, Variations on a Theme, was introduced to the public for the first time. It was accompanied by an unusual program note: It is true that I have sketched for their amusement and mine, the idiosyncrasies of fourteen...
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No. 88, Fall

Editors' Note
Welcome to issue 88 of Current Musicology. Now in its forty-fourth year of publication, this journal remains committed to presenting innovative and interdisciplinary scholarship by musicologists in the early stages of their careers. We are grateful...
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Hearing Glenn Gould's Body: Corporeal Liveness in Recorded Music
Introduction: Liveness, Mediatization, and Glenn Gould's Recordings Live music does not exist without its recorded other. In other words, the concept of liveness in music was unknown until there was something not live--recordings--with which to...
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Degenerate Religion and Masculinity in Parsifal Reception
Our future historians will cull from still unpublished letters and memoirs ... the idea that the performances at Bayreuth had really much the status of religious rites and that their effects were not unlike what is technically called a revival. ...
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A Paper Trail: Missa Jouyssance Vous Donneray, Uncertain Identity, and the National Institutes of Health's "Bathtub Collection"
In a storeroom of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Library of Medicine's History of Medicine Division are seven gray boxes full of envelopes of yellowed paper scraps. These fragments constitute the little-known "Bathtub Collection." Dr. Dorothy...
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No. 87, Spring

Editors' Note
Current Musicology occasionally publishes special issues devoted to specific topics, and although this issue was not strictly conceived as such, it does contain a series of articles that all pertain to opera and performance studies, on a broad range...
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Speaking and Sighing: Bellini's Canto Declamato and the Poetics of Restraint
The critics were confused. "We do not really know whether it should be called sung declamation or declamatory singing," one reviewer for L'eco, an Italian journal devoted to the arts, wrote in 1829. "The goal of this method seems to be to reunite the...
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Kundry and the Jewish Voice: Anti-Semitism and Musical Transcendence in Wagner's Parsifal
For Angela Maraventano Kundry, the only female character in Richard Wagner's last opera, Parsifal (1882), is also the only character to make an overwhelming impression on us with the raw power and extreme versatility of her singing voice. The most...
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Aida and the Empire of Emotions (Theodor W. Adorno, Edward Said, and Alexander Kluge)
For Alexander Kluge (1) Let's start with the facts: two lovers are buried alive, their lungs are full of gas from the crypt; they are cramped with hunger and, as they perish, decay does its unspeakable work on their bodies. In the end, there are...
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Rebel Girls and Singing Boys: Performing Music and Gender in the Teen Movie
Midway through the 1986 teen movie Pretty in Pink comes a strikingly memorable scene. The film's main character, Andie (Molly Ringwald), sits nonchalantly in the local record store where she works. Adorned with posters of mid-1980s post-punk groups...
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Publications Received
Adams, Alton Augustus. 2008. The Memoirs of Alton Augustus Adams, Sr.: First Black Bandmaster of the United States Navy. Edited by Mark Clague, foreword by Samuel Floyd, Jr. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press; Chicago: Center...
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No. 86, Fall

Editors' Note
Now in its forty-third year of publication, Current Musicology continues to offer music scholars a unique space in which to publish work that tests traditional disciplinary configurations. Our editorial board--made up of historical musicologists, ethnomusicologists,...
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Eisler's Notes on Hollywood and the Film Music Project, 1935-42
In 1947, Hanns Eisler in collaboration with Theodor Adorno published a small but important book entitled Composing for the Films. The book represents a significant contribution to film studies, cultural criticism, and the discipline of twentieth-century...
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Beyond Sonata Deformation: Liszt's Symphonic Poem Tasso and the Concept of Two-Dimensional Sonata Form
1. Form and Deformation The idea that musical form in Liszt's orchestral music is mainly program-driven has loomed large in twentieth-century musicology. (1) It undoubtedly originates with Liszt himself. In his seminal 1855 essay Berlioz und seine...
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Becoming Bach, Blaspheming Bach: Kinesthetic Knowledge and Embodied Music Theory in Ysaye's "Obsession" for Solo Violin
This essay explores kinesthetic musical knowledge: what can it tell us about the music, the performer, or the composer? In discussing my own experience of performing "Obsession," the first movement of violinist-composer Eugene Ysaye's Sonata No. 2...
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Producing Producers: Women and Electronic/dance Music
At the time of our meeting, Ashley lived in San Francisco's famous Haight-Ashbury district now overrun with chain stores such as The Gap and Ben and Jerry's. She lived in a large Victorian house with six roommates, which is fairly typical of twenty-something...
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No. 85, Spring

Editor's Note
Current Musicology has long been committed to publishing scholarship that cuts across disciplinary, topical, and theoretical boundaries, contributing to an understanding of "musicology" that is intentionally broad. We are very pleased to continue that...
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Debussy as Storyteller: Narrative Expansion in the Trois Chansons De Bilitis
Every song cycle presents its audience with a narrative. Such an idea is hardly new; indeed, the idea of an unfolding plot or unifying concept (textual or musical) is central to the concept of the song cycle as opposed to a collection of songs, at...
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Periods in Progressive Rock and the Problem of Authenticity
Though "largely ignored" by much mainstream popular music scholarship, and "largely despised" by most critics (Macan 1997:3), the genre of "self-consciously complex" rock music usually known as 1970s "progressive" (or "prog") rock was very popular...
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Medievalism and Exoticism in the Music of Dead Can Dance
In 1991, the alternative rock band Dead Can Dance released an album that caught the attention of music reviewers by constructing an aural allegiance to the Middle Ages. Suitably called A Passage in Time, the album was described as imitating medieval...
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The Filth and the Fury: An Essay on Punk Rock Heavy Metal Karaoke
Lauren is a photographer who lives in New York City. The daughter of a urologist, she grew up in Westchester County and graduated cum laude from NYU. Lauren's master's degree in photography has served her well at Punk Rock Heavy Metal Karaoke (PMK),...
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Fabian Holt. 2007. Genre in Popular Music
Fabian Holt. 2007. Genre in Popular Music. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press. The concept of genre has often presented difficulties for popular music studies. Although discussions of genres and their boundaries frequently emerge from...
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No. 84, Fall

Editor's Note
Welcome to issue 84 of Current Musicology. It is an honor to be entrusted with the editorship of this journal, which has for the last forty-two years served as a unique venue dedicated to publishing the scholarship of musicologists in the early stages...
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The Pastoral after Environmentalism: Nature and Culture in Stephen Albert's Symphony: RiverRun
The year 1972 was a landmark in the history of the environmental movement: the Environmental Protection Agency, founded two years earlier by Richard Nixon, banned the toxic pesticide DDT and authored the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, later amended...
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Dvorak's Armida and the Czech Oriental "Self"
In his path-breaking article on Saint-Saens's Samson et Dalila, Ralph P. Locke claims that nineteenth-century orientalist operas usually included a young, tolerant, brave, possibly naive, white-European tenor-hero [who] intrudes, at risk of...
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Analysis, Performance, and Images of Musical Sound: Surfaces, Cyclical Relationships, and the Musical Work
Introduction It is not a question of junking these concepts, nor do we have the means to do so. Doubtless it is more necessary, from within semiology, to transform concepts, to displace them, to turn them against their presuppositions,...
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Toward a Revised Understanding of Young Children's Musical Activities: Reflections from the "Day in the Life" Project
Introduction: Versions of Musical Childhoods The tradition of developmental psychology has been of fundamental importance in providing versions of musical childhoods, particularly for the earliest years of childhood. However, in its focus on the...
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Operatic Texts: Ours, Yours, and Mine
Roger Parker. 2006. Remaking the Song: Operatic Visions and Revisions from Handel to Berio. Ernest Bloch Lectures. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press. A Carmen without Mercedes, Frasqita, Le Remendado, Le Dancaire, without...
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Publications Received
Current Musicology received copies of the following publications in 2007. When titles have been reviewed in one of our recent issues, we have provided the citation. Adams, Byron, ed. 2007. Edward Elgar and His World. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University...
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No. 82, Fall

Editors' Note
Welcome to issue 82 of Current Musicology. After three themed issues in a row, we are surprised and pleased to find common threads linking the diverse group of articles in this volume. Augustus Arnone's contribution, "The Aesthetics of Textural Ambiguity:...
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The Aesthetics of Textural Ambiguity: Brahms and the Changing Piano
The thought beneath so slight a film Is more distinctly seen As laces just reveal the surge Or Mists the Apennine --Emily Dickinson Introduction In recent years, a number of performance practice scholars writing on Brahms's piano music have...
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Disruptive Spatiality and the Experience of Recordings of Bach's Solo Cello Suites
Antechamber: Bach and Space Architecture, so the saying goes, is "frozen music." Music, conversely, is "liquid" architecture. (1) This aphorism, popular in the early nineteenth century, soon became a cliche. "Should one perhaps speak of ruins,"...
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Corpo-Realities: Keepin' It Real in "Music and Embodiment" Scholarship
In 1980, Abbie Conant, a white American trombonist living in Germany, won the solo trombone chair of the Munich Philharmonic, beating out thirty-two other candidates, all male? Invited to the audition via a letter addressed to Herr Abbie Conant, the...
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The Cyberpolitics of Music in Ukraine's 2004 Orange Revolution
Between November 21 and December 26, 2004, nearly one million people protested in Kyiv against election fraud, media censorship, mass government corruption, and oligarchic market reforms. These large-scale peaceful protests have become widely known...
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Publications Received
Current Musicology received copies of the following publications in 2006. When titles have been reviewed in one of our recent issues (nos. 81-82), we have provided the citation. Adorno, Theodor. 2006. Philosophy of New Music, edited and translated...
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No. 81, Spring

Editor's Note
In honor of W. A. Mozart's 250th birthday, Current Musicology is pleased to present a special collection of four articles exploring contexts for Mozart's life and music, and current issues in Mozart studies. Thomas Irvine leads off the volume with...
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The Foundations of Mozart Scholarship
What are the foundations of Mozart scholarship? The "facts"--there are many of them, and we are always learning more--of a remarkable composer's short life? Or the meanings we read in that life, and the meanings we experience in the music Mozart left...
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A Context for Mozart's French Ariettes: The Wendling Family and Friedrich Schiller's Kabale Und Liebe
This essay examines Mozart's relationship to the Wendling family and the French ariettes he wrote during his visit to Mannheim. Through documentary evidence we glimpse the underside of court life, involving an affair between Elisabeth Augusta Wendling...
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The Idea of Transfiguration in the Early German Reception of Mozart's Requiem
Over the past two hundred years, authorship disputes have dominated scholarly discussions about Mozart's Requiem. From the analysis of handwriting to the provenance of manuscript evidence, much debate has occurred over who wrote what when and about...
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Da Ponte in New York, Mozart in New York
One might be surprised to learn that relatively few of Lorenzo da Ponte's letters have been preserved. In one of these, written in New York in 1824 to an unknown recipient, Da Ponte names what he considered to be five of his most important and successful...
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