Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy

A peer-reviewed, open-access journal of natural and social philosophy. It serves those who see philosophy's vocation in questioning and challenging prevailing assumptions about ourselves and our place in the world, developing new ways of thinking about physical existence, life, humanity and society, so helping to create the future insofar as thought affects the issue.

Articles from Vol. 8, No. 1, January

A Poetic Perspective on Subjectivity
The poetry of T.S. Eliot grapples with the apparent absence of meaning in modern life; it exposes the personal and social fragmentation and disenchantment often masked by assumed conventions in behaviour, communication, and relationships; and it explores...
Badiou and the Consequences of Formalism
I Since at least the Theory of the Subject of 1982 (comprising seminars held from 1975 to 1979), Alain Badiou has attempted in an unparalleled way to conceive of the political and ontological implications of formalism, subjecting the very constitutive...
Ethics after God's Death and the Time of the Angels
INTRODUCTION What is it to be alive when a God is concerned? It is historically to be able to die, as Alain Badiou asserts, (1) like all living beings whose being alive is manifest so long as they are encountered by other living beings, so long...
God's Unlikely Comeback; Evolution, Emanation, and Ecology
PREFATORY COMMENTS The first point relates to the context of this contribution. Were it fully committed to the academic process, certain things are lost and gained. What is lost is its obligation to base itself in forces in the larger society, as...
Introduction: The Future of Philosophy
The closing down of the philosophy department at Middlesex University, along with the downsizing of philosophy departments in Britain, USA, Australia and elsewhere, signify, if this trend is not successfully fought against, the coming to the end of...
On the Need for Speculative Philosophy Today
1. THREE PHILOSOPHICAL FIGURES 'The task of philosophy is impiety and corruption'. So proclaimed Simon Critchley during a public event sponsored by the New York Public Library and held at the New School for Social Research on January 26, 2011. The...
Poststructuralism and Deconstruction: A Mathematical History
Examples are not lacking of philosophers whose outlook was inspired or in some way influenced by thinking about the meaning of mathematics: Wittgenstein, Husserl, Russell, before them Peirce, and more recently Badiou, to name only the clearest cases...
Reconstructing Bhaskar's Transcendental Analysis of Experimental Activity
[section]1. INTRODUCTION Perhaps the most prominent feature of Roy Bhaskar's early work in the philosophy of natural science is the claim that ontology is inexorable, which was advanced in opposition to the anti-metaphysical orthodoxy in the philosophy...
Semiotic, Rhetoric and Democracy
SEMIOTIC THEORY John Deely's major project is about how the philosophical approach called semiosis originated with the scholastics who called it doctrina signorum. He explains how this valuable work was eclipsed at the beginning of modernity. He...
Skepticism concerning Causality: An Evolutionary Epistemological Perspective
INTRODUCTION Spurred largely by the explosion of new research in philosophy of biology over the last twenty years, a current trend of scholarship in Continental philosophy is to reevaluate or to recast the claims of major thinkers in light of evolutionary...
The Future of Speculation?
In today's professionally precarious context of 'continental philosophy', any living debate is, it seems, to be welcomed--especially when that debate involves a turn to the question of speculation. For, philosophical speculation is traditionally concerned...
The Master and His Emissary: The Divided Brain and the Making of the Western World
Iain McGilchrist, The Master and His Emissary: The Divided Brain and the Western World, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2010, ix + 534 pp. ISBN: 978-0-30016892-1 pb, 11.99, $25.00. It is now more than a century since Friedrich Nietzsche...
The Politics of Presentation: On Badiou as Reader of Rousseau
INTRODUCTION Reflecting on his relationship with the history of philosophy in the preface to the English edition of Metapolitics, Alain Badiou writes: "if one finds an emphasis in my writings--in restricting myself to the deceased--on proper names...
The Triumph of Virtual Reality and Its Implications for Philosophy and Civilization
Nicholas Carr in his book, The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains, argues, that as a consequence of our increasing engagement with the internet: What we're experiencing is, in a metaphorical sense, a reversal of the early trajectory...
Two Paths to Infinite Thought: Alain Badiou and Jacques Derrida on the Question of the Whole
1. THERE IS NO WHOLE? This essay defends an idea that is no longer fashionable: that there is a whole. There are many detractors of this notion, though recently Alain Badiou has provided a novel, non-ethical reason for its rejection: such a notion...
Vital Concerns and Vital Illusions
'It is easier to imagine the end of the world than to imagine the end of capitalism.' Fredric Jameson I. ON THE NEED TO STOP AND THINK ABOUT LIFE AND THOUGHT A prerequisite for good thinking, says Hannah Arendt, is a complete letting go of...
Wherefore Art Thou Philosophy? Badiou without Badiou
I wish to begin this essay with an example. Readers familiar with Alain Badiou's work may notice a difficulty with it. I will address this difficulty at the end. For the moment, at the risk of misleading and mis-representing Badiou's work to those...

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