The Cato Journal

The Cato Journal is a leading free-market public policy journal. The Cato Journal features articles discussing politics and the economy of interest to scholars and professionals but accessible to a general audience as well.

Articles from Vol. 22, No. 1, Spring-Summer

A Regulatory Bypass Operation
Our health insurance choices are burdened by thickening fatty deposits of regulatory sclerosis. We need to open up some new arteries for consumer-driven health care reform. A regulatory bypass operation would insert market-based shunts, grafts,...
Defined Contribution: From Managed Care to Patient-Managed Care
After more than a decade of extraordinary turbulence in the financing and delivery of health care, it is sobering but probably accurate to anticipate even greater challenges in the near future. Indeed, one commentator has ventured that health care...
HIPAA and Health Care Fraud: An Empirical Perspective
The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act passed Congress nearly unanimously in 1996. When HIPAA was considered, the focus of attention was portability. Little or no attention was paid to the statutory provisions relating to "accountability"--fraud...
HIPAA and the Criminalization of American Medicine
Waste, fraud, and abuse in federal health care programs are serious problems, but so are the federal government's efforts to combat them. There are egregious cases of fraud, and those engaged in these criminal activities should be stopped and prosecuted....
HIPAA on Privacy: Its Unintended and Intended Consequences
The single most conspicuous growth industry in Washington, D.C., is regulation and the administrative structure it spawns. The number of programs in Washington that start big is relatively small. The dominant strategy in all cases is to identify...
HIPAA's Small-Group Access Laws: Win, Loss, or Draw?
Perhaps the least controversial aspect of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) is the set of provisions regulating access to health insurance by small employers (those with 2-50 workers). HIPAA builds on an extensive set...
Just Gotta Learn from the Wrong Things You Done
I have long had an interest in health policy. But I first became passionate about health care during the epic battle over Clinton Care in 1993 and 1994. I still regard that victory as one of the finest hours for Republicans in Congress. And I take...
Principles for Protecting Privacy
The past five years have witnessed an explosion in legislation, regulation, and litigation designed to protect the privacy of personal information. Congress alone has adopted comprehensive federal financial privacy legislation, online privacy protection...
Regulation of Bad Things That Almost Never Happen but Could: HIPAA and the Individual Insurance Market
Since the collapse of the Clinton plan for large-scale health reform, Congress has approached the medical care sector of the economy very gingerly. One apparent lesson of the reform (though an obvious lesson in life) is that people are much less...
The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act: More Than We Bargained for, and Less
When Congress passed the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) in 1996, the legislation was marketed as a modest attempt to address health insurance portability problems facing insured workers who wanted to change jobs. So-called...
Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.