New African

Articles from No. 441, June

ADB: The Battle for President
The African Development Bank (ADB) will have to wait till 21 July to know who will be its next president to replace Omar Kabbaj whose term ends at the end of August. After two hectic days of voting at its 40th annual general meeting held in the Nigeria...
Adopting for a Brighter Future: It Is a Fact That the Highest Proportion of Children in Care in the UK Today Are from Black and Mixed Parentage Families. Promoting Fostering and Adoption within the African Diaspora Communities, the Thank U Organisation Helps Black Children in Need of a Loving Family Home. Stuart Price Reports
For Sally Baffour and her two adopted children, twins Arata and Lawei, life resonates with the love, affection and warmth of any family home. Thirteen years ago, at the tender age of two, they were taken into care by Sally and have never looked back....
Africa Economic Summit 2005: Africa Opens for Business; This Year's Africa Economic Summit Is Held in Cape Town, South Africa, from 1-3 June. Organised by the World Economic Forum, It Comes at a Time When Africa Finds Itself Perfectly Poised to Attract Business and Investors from around the World. Stuart Price Reports
The year 2005 appears to be Africa's year. The continent has become something of a cause celebre among world leaders, and not least in Britain where the report of Tony Blair's Commission for Africa is still warm from its birth. Combine this with the...
Betrayed by Lemons: The Reason Why I Was a Bit Cleverer Than Most of My Classmates When I Started My Schooling Was That I Had Already Obtained a Smattering of "Education" Thanks to an Elder Half-Brother of Mine, Kwasi Kwakye. He Was Already in Standard Three When I Enrolled in Class One
When I started schooling Kwasi Kwakye's status as a "senior" covered me and prevented the "senior" boys from bullying me. This was important, for there was a tradition whereby senior boys were allowed to homo every novice they could find in the school....
Capitulation Is Not an Option
"If there had not been a drought this year, given that we are in the closing phase of the land reform programme, the economy would have performed in a manner never experienced in the last 25 years ... I will tell you this, by the end of next year we...
Communication Changing Lives: The Communication and Information Technology Revolution Has Reached Far and Wide, and as Bamuturaki Musinguzi Finds out, It Is Now Touching Rural Uganda
Standing at his residence in Kiyindi Landing Site in Mukono District, Uganda, Ali Kadudu tells me he has earned a lot from the telephone he is holding in his hand. "I have bought a lot of things; like a plot of land, a bicycle, selling of used cloths...
Did Britain Divide Sudan? Not So, According to Jacob Akol, Who Argues That the Country Was Never United, Even before the British Arrived; They Simply Exploited Already Existing Divisions
Let's be clear about a few things. What we now call the British-initiated system of divide and rule in Sudan is a misguided belief as far as this particular country is concerned. With regard to North-South relations, the two regions were never united...
Ecowas Has Lived Up to Expectations, Says Chambas
"The tribute for what Ecowas is today goes to all the leaders of the member states for collectively providing leadership, and for the sacrifices they continue to make. We also salute the community citizens for embracing the Ecowas agenda for a borderless...
Ghana: If You Can't Get the Father, Get the Son; John Addo Kufour, the Eldest Son of President John Agyekum Kufuor Is in the News for the Wrong Reason. He Thinks Some People Are Playing Dirty Politics by Trying to Get at His Father through Attacking Him, the Son. Douglas Akwasi Owusu Reports from Accra
If you can't get the father, get the son; or better still, get the father through the son, appears to be the new name of politics in Ghana as opponents of President John Agyekum Kufuor are resorting to the old trick to get at him via his eldest son,...
Grappling with the Maize Question: Nicholas Goche, Zimbabwe's New Minister of Public Service, Labour and Social Welfare, Has Perhaps One of the Most Difficult Portfolios. He Talked to New African on How He Is Grappling with the Maize and Other Questions
Nicholas Goche has responsibility for drought mitigation in a country that has suffered four continuous seasons of drought. So you might think this brilliant man spends hours discussing anti-depressants. Not in his book! Rather, you meet one of the...
Happy Birthday, Mozambique: 25 June Will Mark 30 Years since Mozambique Became an Independent Nation. It Is Hoped That the Recently-Elected President Armando Guebuza Will Be Able to Continue the Notable Economic Recovery That Obtained at the Turn of the Century
Geographically and economically overshadowed by South Africa, the country of Mozambique is the size of Britain and France put together. Its 1,250 mile-long seaboard along the Indian Ocean extends from South Africa's province of Natal to Tanzania, from...
"It Was the Bullet That Brought the Ballot"
Zimbabwe is 25 years old as an independent country. The year-long celebrations kicked off on 17 April (eve of independence) with a state reception where honours and awards were given to Zimbabwean heroes and luminaries of Southern Africa who played...
Kenya: The Growing Land Issue; after Two-and-a-Half Years in Power, Kenya's Government Is Still to Tackle the Country's Smouldering Land Issue That Remains in Much Need of Redress. Fred Oluoch Reports
To Basil Criticos, a former member of parliament and a second generation Kenyan of Greek decent, it matters not whether Kenya, unlike Zimbabwe, is trying to redress the glaring disparity in land ownership rationally. [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Criticos...
Land Reform Is Irreversible
In the next few months, the Zimbabwe government will publish a landmark National Agricultural Strategy Framework to cover the next 30 years (2005-2035). It will be a comprehensive document never before seen in the annals of the country. This was revealed...
"Maybe I Came out of the Guinness Book of Records": Zimbabwe's First Woman Vice President, Joice Teurai Ropa Mujuru, Talks to New African and Says If Her People and Party Decide That She Is the Right Candidate to Carry the Torch after President Mugabe, She Will Gladly Accept the Challenge
From the outside, Joice Teurai Ropa Mujuru, 50, appears to be the new girl on the block in Zimbabwe. But she is not! Born on 15 April 1955 at Mount Darwin, she has been in the cabinet for 25 unbroken years--in fact since independence in 1980! A freedom...
"Mugabe Is Not the Problem"
Patrick Chinamasa, Zimbabwe's minister of justice, legal and parliamentary affairs, says the local opposition has been hoodwinked by the West into thinking that President Mugabe is the wrong person for the country, but he is not. "President Mugabe...
Mugabe: We Won't Go Back to the Commonwealth
Zimbabwe celebrates 25 years of independence with an uncompromising message for all who want to hear: "We won't go back to the Commonwealth. It is a useless body to start with, and it has treated us in a dishonourable manner," says President Mugabe...
Nigeria: The Battle for 2007; the Battle for Nigeria's Presidential Seat in 2007 Has Begun in Earnest and Early Indications Are That It Is Going to Be Dirty. Pini Jason Reports
On 7 May, stalwarts of the ruling People's Democratic Party (PDP), including Gbenga Obasanjo, the son of President Olusegun Obasanjo, resplendent in their billowing agbada, descended on Yola, the capital of Adamawa State. The event was the public declaration...
Senegal: Remembering Anta Diop the Great
Nineteen years ago--on 7 February 1986--Africa lost one of its greatest sons, Dr Cheikh Anta Diop of Senegal (pictured below) who died quietly in his sleep in Dakar. A historian and political activist par excellence, Diop's work hugely affected the...
Sudan: Everything Is in the Hands of the People; as a Veteran Politician and Leading Voice in the Southern Sudanese Opposition, Dr Bona Malwal Shares with Rocco Blume His Thoughts on the Recently Concluded Peace Agreement and His Concerns for Sudan's Future
The hallowed surroundings of Oxford University are a world away from the stifling, dusty heat of Khartoum or the lush rolling hills and plains of southern Sudan. Yet it is the location to speak with one of Sudan's most eminent and vociferous political...
Tempered like Steel: The Economic Community of West African States Celebrated Its 30th Anniversary in May, 2005. One of the Oldest Sub-Regional Organisations, It Has Survived a Turbulent Period and Come out Stronger at the End. Anver Versi Profiles the Organisation in This Special Tribute Feature
The Economic Community of West African States, (Ecowas), grouping all 15 West African countries, celebrated 30 years of existence in May this year. The celebrations are well deserved as the last 30 years have been, to say the least, turbulent in this...
The Way Forward
The country is calm but the political fight against attacks from Britain and the West remains. Agrarian reforms are expected to succeed, and when agriculture recovers, the economy will turn around. But the irony of it all is that when this happens...
The Way of the Borana: On the Beautiful Yet Unforgiving Arid Plains of Southern Ethiopia Lives a People Whose Ingenuity, Strength and Customs Have Stood the Test of Time for Centuries. Kate Eshelby Visited the Lands the Borana Call Home and Experienced Firsthand Their Resourceful and Traditional Ways of Life
Dust kicks up as a long line of camels and cows wander down a path dug below ground leading to a deep well. Men stand on top of one another, forming a human chain down the well. They toss buckets between each other on a precarious ladder, gathering...
Wanted: Spies for CIA; "Mr Director, When You Joined the CIA in 1962, It Recruited Actively and Effectively on College Campuses ... If You're Able to Reconnect with the Country's Top Universities and Their Students, the Rewards Will Be Great Down the Line."
Let's talk about security. Your security, my security, our security. New security issues and the new security employees' CVs. What are they and where must they come from? [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] I've been reading an interesting article in the...
"What We Have Done Here Is like the Rabbit Chasing the Dog"
"I was asked the other day about the ban on The Daily News. I said it was not banned, it banned itself. Our laws say you register when you want to operate a media outfit, but they said they didn't want to register because they didn't recognise the...
WTO: A Game of Serious Arm-Twisting
There was "business as usual" at the WTO General Council meeting in Geneva in July 2004. The powerful countries, as usual, used every trick in the book--arm-twisting, bribes, inducements and threats--to influence the outcome of the trade talks and...
WTO: Not a Pretty Place to Do Business
The World Trade Organisation (WTO) holds its 6th Ministerial Conference in Hong Kong, China, from 13-18 December 2005. At its last General Council meeting in Geneva in July 2004, a "Framework Document" was adopted after a lot of arm-twisting by the...
Zimbabwe Honours African Heroes
"Through such awards, we reaffirm our African-ness, challenging the false gods who have sat long and heavy on our real heroes, our real history, thanks to colonial education. We proclaim our pan-African spirit, stressing we shall never be a colony...
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.