NATE Classroom

Articles from No. 6, Autumn

Book Box News
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] E-Books By Gum! A conversation on Radio 4's Today Programme on 8.8.08 will have struck a chord with many English teachers. James Naughtie was examining the prospect for e-books. Apparently publishers...
Clear-Sited
Type the word drama into a search engine and just over 200 million hits are registered: type in Shakespeare and the result narrows, but not much. The reduction is to just over 41 million. Some days I feel like I have visited just about half of them!...
Culture Change: Globe Education Welcomes New Opportunities
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] In July, the DCSF launched a new booklet for teachers: Shakespeare for all ages and stages. Globe Education at Shakespeare's Globe welcomes this mandate: a 'framework of opportunities' has at last been provided through...
Discover: National Theatre
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] What's in a name? In as language-conscious a sector as theatre education, it's not surprising that many 'Education' departments have been rethinking their names over the past few years. 'Creative Learning' or 'Participation'...
Drama in the Not-So-English Classroom
Good morning, Mr Smith.' 'Good morning, Banana. How are you?' 'Fine. Oh, I've changed my name.' 'Really? What to?' 'Big Boy.' Three months in to my Hong Kong teaching experience, and at long last, my students have unwittingly succeeded...
Extract
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] After prose and poetry, clearly it's now time for a bite of non-fiction and hot toast was offered by writer and actor Ben Crystal. His new publication is well suited to our theme for this issue: a readable, light-hearted...
It's All Down to Shakespeare
Some of my most humiliating moments have come about because I 'teach Shakespeare'. It's almost as if the wicked wit that punctured Malvolio's pride reaches out from the grave to prod my ego at key points in my life. It all started when I was at...
Macbeth and Year 5
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] When Hamlet said 'The play's the thing ...', the last thing Shakespeare could have anticipated was that we would be involving children as young as eight- or nine-years-old in his plays over 400 years later. At William Parker...
Selling Shakespeare to Key Stage 3 (Begin with Doctor Who ...)
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Ah ... September ... The season of pristine uniforms, ties at full mast, eager Year 7 faces, the scent of sharpened pencils and ... Shakespeare!! What is it about this name that inspires so much fear and trepidation in...
Shakespeare in Context
In February 2006 the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust and the English-Speaking Union joined forces to run the first ever Great Shakespeare Debate. This was a competitive debate for AS and A2 level students who came together to debate motions surrounding...
Shakespeare Unleashed
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] It was in my first year of teaching that I was reprimanded for putting plastics bags over the heads of an entire class of Year 7 pupils. My defence--which even now seems eccentric--was that I was...
Shakespearience in the GCSE Classroom: Shakespeare and GCSE Coursework
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] For many youngsters, Shakespeare is encountered as a duty, an obligation or a test of Reading. They may be aware, or have been told, that there is some benefit to be gained from the encounter, but they may not be sure what...
Something Wicked This Way Comes ... Taking Shakespeare out of the Classroom
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Last October an advert for a job at the Shakespeare Schools Festival both excited me and brought back the long dreary hours spent 'learning' Shakespeare at school. If only SSF had been around in the nineties! My SSF...
Standing Up for Shakespeare: The Royal Shakespeare Company's Playback Project
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] In Year 9 Jason has a reading age of 5. Of the many threats to his self-esteem thrown up by English literature, Shakespeare ranks high. Sinead is on a Ritalin regime: conventional classroom organisation is for her a foreign...
Tackling 'Hard to Teach' Topics
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Some things are notoriously hard to teach. They may be conceptually challenging, involve literature that has inherent difficulties or even simply come across as deadly dull to students. But for various reasons, we have...
Teaching Richard for SATs: An NQT's Personal Reflections and Regrets
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] I was as surprised as anyone when, as a student, I saw Richard III performed by the RSC in 2003 and absolutely loved it. Instead of the obscure and rather esoteric performance I expected from a...
Teachit Staffroom Roundup-Hot Topics
Education for Leisure What a way to end the summer holidays and start the new year! AQA's decision to remove the Carol Ann Duffy poem 'Education for Leisure' from the Anthology was met with howls of horror by the occupants of the staffroom; so...
The Bard on Broadband
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Ever considered using video conferencing to promote students' collaborative learning across a number of schools? Ever stopped to consider the thought of blogging with the Bard? Read on to find out how students from nine...
The Drama Enthusiast: A Million Different Directions
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] You know you're on to a winner as a teacher when a child like 'Vinay', who has trouble writing in full sentences and stumbles when reading whole class texts, is genuinely excited about a literacy...
Theme for This Issue: Drama & Shakespeare
At NATE conference 2008, an American visitor commented that, as far as English teaching concerns and subject matter goes, there are many parallels between the UK and the US--but one marked difference is the amount of Shakespeare on our curriculum,...
'The Play's the Thing'
All the resources mentioned in this article are freely available on the special NATE Classroom page at http://www.teachit.co.uk/nateclassroom. The title of each resource (here in bold) links directly to the file for you to download. Or is it?...
'The Road Less Travelled': A New Series of Articles by Julie Blake Begins Here, Focusing on Texts Which Deserve More Popularity, Having Much to Offer Both Teachers and Students
PYGMALION by George Bernard Shaw Play first produced 1913, first published 1916 Key Stage 3/4 'Writers from the English literary heritage writing in the twentieth century' [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] George Bernard...
Unlucky for Some?
Below are the openings to thirteen well-known children's books--but only twelve authors and their books are listed. Pair them up and decide from which book by which author does that thirteenth opening come? In the sea, once upon a time, O my...
Up, Close and Personal: An Exercise in Reading in Drama
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Context Since May 2007, Rotherham's 'Drama into Literacy' (DiL) programme has explored ways in which drama may be used to engage, inspire and improve pupils' literacy progress in both primary...
We Know It's a Story-But What If It Were True? Using Drama and Nursery Rhymes to Support Reading for Meaning
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Have you ever asked a young child to consider how the fictional characters in a story might be feeling at various points in the narrative, only to be reminded firmly by...
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