Chicago Review

An international journal of literature, interviews, and reviews. For academic audiences.

Articles from Vol. 45, No. 1, 1999

Bridget Jones's Diary
Helen Fielding. Bridget Jones's Diary. New York: Viking, 1998. More than twenty-five years ago writers like Erica Jong and Adrienne Rich chronicled the perils and triumphs of women in the ERA-age. Today, Helen Fielding chronicles the perils and triumphs...
Damaged Glamour
John Forbes. Damaged Glamour. Brandl & Schlesinger, 1998. Damaged Glamour, published posthumously through the financial assistance of his family and friends, presents John Forbes's poetry with all its contradictions and tensions and stylish grace....
Diamond Jack
Defiance was Jack's last mode. Editing his collected poems, Presences of Mind (out there in your bookstores, published by Gnomen Press) I wonder was I wrong to leave out sections of the unfinished Working Stiffs? In it Jack invented a line, sharp, street-smart,...
Douglas Oliver's New York Peom
Penniless Politics, a long poem by the British poet Douglas Oliver, could be called a quintessentially New York poem, if by "New York poem" were understood the result of necessary changes in that genre in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Under the pressures...
Levis and All Loss
In the poems of Elegy, Larry Levis tries again and again to face obliteration, to take in the truth of obliteration, to realize it. This great theme fuels the poetry in such an unremitting, obsessive way that the book's publication after Levis's death...
Notes and Comments
Paul Metcalf was a unique force in twentieth-century American literature, an eccentric in the best sense of the word. A great-grandson of Herman Melville, he was one of a handful of writers to have reconciled nineteenthcentury American prose traditions...
Overtures
I meant to say something about what happened after I discovered a miserable pile of stones twenty-five kilometers north of Vilnius. The stones mark the geographical center of Europe, a place not on my maps, though if you get around as much as I do you'll...
Palooka
Palooka The bartendress had already flipped the window sign around and counted up her tips, when this rocket-hot, jock-mechanic invites me up for a toke at his spartan apartment on the second floor above the Palestinian grocery. He fiddled with the television...
Scandals in the House of Birds: Shamans and Priests on Lake Atitlan
Nathaniel Tarn. Scandals in the House of Birds: Shamans and Priests on Lake Atitlkn. Marsilio, 1997. The full title of Nathaniel Tarn's new book reveals much. Lake Atitlan lies in the central highlands of Guatemala, surrounded by volcanoes and hills....
The Destructive Element: New and Selected Poems
Turner Cassity. The Destructive Element: New and Selected Poems. Athens: Ohio University Press, 1998. Marx commented that events in history occur twice, first as tragedy and then as farce.' It strikes me that, oddly enough, Turner Cassity holds a similar...
Vanitas Motel
The very title "Vanitas Motel" seems to locate us in a highminded but slightly seedy environment, and Jon Loomis's poems veer deftly and ironically between the sacramental and the sordid. If all flesh is grass, and it is vanity to think otherwise, nevertheless...
Viridian
Paul Hoover. Viridian. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1997. As "postmodern" poetry resolves into focus, much of it seems characterized by a self-conscious deployment of awkwardness, absurdity, and a certain range of humor. Charles Bernstein, for...
When the Saints: Part Two
When the Saints Part Two The subject was roses the problem is memory "all that is musical in us is memory" memory is musical memory is musical in suggestion suggestion of a progression of a progression to a destination the destination of music is harmony...
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