Chief Executive (U.S.)

Magazine providing full scope of CEO lifestyle and experience. Includes news, CEO profiles, and strategies.

Articles from No. 176, March

America Needs Research Funding-Now
CHIEF CONCERN If the U.S. can't create the technical talent Intel needs, we'll chase it wherever it may be. Basic research -the pure, fundamental research that leads to the development of new technologies-is in trouble in the United States. To maintain...
And the Winner Is
...Sam Palmisano, by a length. Experts see a leaner, tighter and friendlier Big Blue under the new regime. even years ago, Sam Palmisano was in a small IBM conference room in Somers, N.Y., with a group of communications managers, preparing for an upcoming...
CEOs Anonymous
COVER STORY Hardly acknowledged, rarely confronted, alcoholism is a stealthy liability that pervades corporate America and puts some of its brightest leaders at risk. So far, 2002 has been a rough year for Drew Lewis, former chairman and CEO of Union...
China's Change Merchants
TECHNOLOGY A new breed of CEO emerging in China is wiring the nation-- and portending change for just about everything else. Zhongguancun, China's Silicon Valley, is as different from California's as imaginable. Rather than sprawling corporate campuses,...
Cornell Cos. Scrutinizes Its Books
enron fallout This isn't a good time to be CEO of a Houston company audited by Arthur Andersen. Especially if you are a former Arthur Andersen accountant. And most especially if you may have to restate your earnings because the "innovative" off-the-books...
Dismal Indemnity
Want to buy a big building or a company jet? Go for it-- but good luck getting it insured. As just about every CEO in America demands departmental cutbacks to survive this recession, the nation's risk managers, whose job it is to purchase insurance,...
Docs off the Clocks
A pair of enterprising Beantown physicians recently announced plans to launch an exclusive medical practice that, according to The New York Times, "charges patients $4,000 a year on top of the medical costs covered by their health insurance." Subscribers...
Enronize This
EDITOR'S NOTE Everybody-pundits, politicians, friends, taxi drivers-keeps telling me how complicated the Enron story is. How arcane are Enron's finances, how tangled a web were its connections with Capitol Hill. In fact, so seductive is the "complicated...
Enterprise Goes Social
MARKET HORIZONS Europe fumbles entrepreneurialism, but hones another form of capitalism: social enterprise. At the beginning of the 1990s, Germans stood on top of the crumbling remnants of the Berlin Wall and proclaimed the end of communism. With minimal...
Face Value
MANAGEMENT CEOs collect and collate information in at least 27 different ways-nine are discussed here-but most insist on personal interactions for the real truth. "Garbage in, garbage out." It's a phrase that could apply to how corporate leaders make...
Feedback
On the Bright Side In response to the article on Texas Instruments' CEO Tom Engibous ("TI's Rock Amid Rubble," CE: November 2001), there has been a lot of negative talk about the recession, and I'd like to encourage a little positive thinking. I'm in...
So You Want to Write a Book
Celebrity status comes and goes, but CEO stories shed light on the art of business. Tony Kelley has had a year to get used to the phenomenon, and he's still bemused by it. "I feel that the whole world looks at me slightly differently," says the general...
The Great Game of Catch-Up
CAPITOL IDEAS Congress will close loopholes more slowly than lawyers find new ones, but greed will still get punished. There have been moments in American history when abuses of capitalism reached such proportions that the government felt compelled to...
There's No "I" in This Team
PROFILE CEO Bob Beyster steers SAIC through recession and terrorist attacks, but it's not easy running an employeeowned company in the wake of Enron's collapse. J. Robert Beyster has led Science Applications International Corp. through many economic...
The Truth about Honorary Degrees
In 1845, the founder of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, William Barton Rogers, wrote in a report to the Virginia legislature that honorary degrees amounted to "literary almsgiving ...of spurious merit and noisy popularity." To this day, MIT...