Chief Executive (U.S.)

Magazine providing full scope of CEO lifestyle and experience. Includes news, CEO profiles, and strategies.

Articles from No. 122, April

Ask the Experts
"Our company is strongly considering opening a virtual storefront to offer selected products and services on-line. However, the channel is unfamiliar; which payment mechanisms should we be considering? Ira Morrow, Research Director, Gartner Group You...
A Wired World
A Doonesbury cartoon of the early 1980s got it right. Mike Doonesbury asks a store manager, "Excuse me, sir. Do you have any user-friendly sales reps?" The store manager replies, "You mean, consumer compatible liveware? No, he's off today." With this...
Betting on Technology
Courier It's not easy to lead systems implementation when you're too busy to know much about it. But if you don't take the risk, your competitors could leave you behind. Here's one CEO who bravely took the leap of faith into the technological abyss,...
Can Europe Compete?
DAVOS, SWITZERLAND-The bonhomie in Davos, as 1,200 top executives from around the world meet for the World Economic Forum's annual joy-through-globalization symposium, at times masked a disquieting mood among the Europeans. Though discussions of issues...
Easing Systems Integration, Post-Merger
Post-merger integration is never an easy affair, and in no area is the challenge more complicated and dangerous than in merging information technology. Improperly integrated disparate systems can result in seriously interrupted customer service, and...
Front Lines
Dulles, VA-based America Online has found a new way to expand its revenue base-a good thought in light of the much-publicized denial-of-ser vice law suits. The plan: company-sponsored chat rooms (e.g., a Michael Jordan chat session sponsored by Nike)....
Fully Oriented
The expansion of investment opportunities beyond the domestic front requires constant observation of what's going on around the globe. And, at the moment, a careful analysis of the global marketplace offers some surprising results. For example, while...
Global Wake Up Call
Last February, 68 countries, accounting for 90 percent of the world telecommunications market, agreed to liberalize their home markets, opening up the $600 billion-a-year industry to direct competition. The World Trade Organization pact is expected to...
Healthy Numbers
During one weekend visit to South Florida, Bill Watts took in both a Marlins and a Panthers game. "I love competitive things," Watts explains-a statement that could just as easily describe his approach to business. For while his $846 million General...
IT's Elusive ROI
IT's Elusive ROI Your IS manager is raving about the benefits of a hot new technology-but how do you pay for it all? Of all the tech-related quandries, perhaps the greatest puzzle associated with implementing any IT solution isn't choosing the right...
It Takes a Global Village
For the past 20 years, Chief Executive magazine has served as a chronicle of the lives, times, challenges, and triumphs of CEOs throughout America and the world. In celebration of our 20th anniversary, we've asked a number of CEOs who have held their...
Korea's Labor Laments
After years of relative acquiescence in market reforms, organized labor appears to be a new and disruptive player in 1997. Korea, where the onset of labor strife has slowed economic growth, may be the most dramatic example, but other countries share...
Letters
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE To the Editor: I was very interested in reading the latest issue of Chief Executive, which lists "the best and worst boards." Directorship specializes in consulting with corporations on ways to strengthen boards and help boards get...
Next Generation Manufacturing
WHAT DOES IT TAKE TO CREATE THE RIGHT CULTURE, PROCESSES, AND TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE... Popular opinion would have us believe that manufacturing's importance to the economy has seriously declined. While manufacturing's share of employment has steadily...
Not a Lot of Junk
The junk bond market, which reached a frenzied peak back in 1993, fell off the following year and has slowly crawled back into corporate favor. 1996 was the third best year for junk bonds, with 233 issues totaling $37.7 billion dollars, reports Securities...
On Balance
Was Ohaus customer-oriented or manufacturing-oriented Could it continue to meet varying customer demands without slowing its production line, missing its deli dates, and losing ground to its competitors? Th complete overhaul of every aspect of its buk...
Planting Excellence
What can a chocolate company teach a large chemical plant about the manufacturing process? Plenty, according to the results of a newly minted best factory award One of the biggest challenges in evaluating manufacturing processes is the vast domain of...
Rah, Rah for New Corporate U
Don't start howling derisively when I say this, but I think the CEO's job at one of today's corporations is beginning to resemble that of the dean at a big business school. The CEO must decide what will be taught, who will teach, and who will train the...
Raise High the Roof Beam
Are there limits to outsourcing? Will companies hive off all but the most core of competencies, ' hile establishing carefully planned strategic alli ces with suppliers, customers, and competitors? Or will outscoring simply provide the means for weathering...
Son Shines
Last February, it was folic acid for heart disease, thanks to research in the New England journal of Medicine; in June, a USC study touted vitamin E for artery narrowing; at year end, the hit book The Arthritis Cure lauded chondroitin sulfate. Each event...
Stop the Job Hop!
IT'S A SITUATION WE'VE ALL EXPERIenced-standing in the hotel's check-in line, wondering why management can't find enough people to work the front desk. "With all the people who need jobs today," we fume, "why can't they hire enough employees to get the...
Take the Points
There is nothing in the corporate world more depressing than a stock price that resolutely refuses to move out of the basement. A depressed stock price, say $11, infuriates shareholders, disheartens management, and has a demotivating effect on employees...
Taking Credit
Richard Fairbank knows where you live. He knows the stores you shop at, the restaurants you frequent, and the last credit card purchase you made. Understanding how people spend money-and how much they spend-is part of Fairbank's job as chairman and CEO...
The 5-Step Program
Serious about making reductions in turnover? Here's how to get down to business. Step 1: Quantify Turnover Cost. Answer two questions: First, what is your company's baseline turnover rate? Many companies are surprised to learn that they have more than...
The Scientific Method
Tony L. White, the 50-year-old chairman, president, and chief executive of Norwalk, CT-based Perkin-Elmer Corp., has follow-through; anybody who marries his junior-high-school sweetheart does. As White turns what had been a scientific utility into a...
Web Watch
www.businesstech.com Published by Tribeca Research, a New York technology strategy consulting firm, BusinessTech provides an insider's look at IT management. With pieces contributed by corporate execs, practicing consultants, and industry analysts, the...
Welfare Reform-Corporate-Style
"We have to launch a national effort in every state and every community to make sure that the jobs are there for people who have to make the transition from welfare to work," President Clinton stated during a meeting with 13 CEOs. "Welfare reform, if...