Afro-Americans in New York Life and History

A scholarly journal that presents original research on the life and history of African Americans in New York State. Issues such as race relations and racial attitudes are addressed. Includes reviews of books in the subject area. For students and academici

Articles from Vol. 26, No. 1, January 31

Arnold Rampersad, and Others, Ed., the Collected Works of Langston Hughes
18 vol.; Columbia, Missouri: University of Missouri Press, 2001.Langston Hughes is one of the most prolific writers of the twentieth century. His literary works reveal the diversity, beauty, and pain of the African American experience from the early...
Caryl Phillips. the Atlantic Sound
(New York, New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2000), ISBN 0-375-40110-5.Beginning in the 16(th) century, the African slave trade deposited Africans in numerous locales on the Eastern coast of the so-called New World. After the end of slavery and colonialism,...
From Slavery to Freedom: John Edward Bruce's Childhood and Adolescence
In March 1897, Charles W. Anderson requested that Levi P. Morton, New York's Republican Governor, appoint John Edward Bruce to a minor political post. Anderson, a respected Black Republican stalwart, had been a member of the New York Republican State...
Peg Leg Bates and the Peg Leg Bates Country Club
Peg's Ode(1)Don't look at me in sympathyI am glad that I'm this wayFor I feel goodAnd I'm knockin' on woodAs long as I could sayYou just watch me peg itYou can tell by the way that I leg itThat I'm Peg Leg Bates, the one legged dancin' manI mix light...
Race, Politics, and Patronage: John Edward Bruce and the Republican Party
On September 8, 1879, The Weekly Argus boasted that it was "Republican at all times and under all circumstances." Despite the Great Compromise with the South nearly two years earlier, John Edward Bruce, co-owner and associate editor of the paper, believed...
The Strikes That Changed New York: Race, Culture, and Ocean Hill-Brownsville, 1960-1975
On the morning of May 9, 1968, a Jewish junior high school science teacher named Fred Nauman received a letter that would change New York City. The letter Nauman opened that day was signed by the chairman of a local school board in Brooklyn's predominantly...