Ecos

A bimonthly scholarly journal that publishes research and issues of sustainability in the environment, industry and community. Focused on Australia and the Asia-Pacific region.

Articles from No. 147, February-March

Drinking to Success-Wine for Wetlands
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] If the adage 'you are what you eat--and drink' applies to wine, then the value that one wine brand places on conservation can help you bring visible benefits to the environment with every sip. Banrock Station winery was...
Getting Street Smart
A growing suburban conservation movement is rolling out across Australia, nurturing local community groups who are working to live sustainably and to save their particular patches of natural assets. That ecological sustainability needs to be about...
Golden Nectar Gone Green: Last Year Was the Year of the 'Green' Beer. Not the St Patrick's Day Green, but the Environmentally Friendly, Quench-Your-Conscience-While-You-Quench-Your-Thirst Kind of Green. Wendy Pyper Checked to See Which Earn Their Colours
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Establishing a lead in the niche market for green beer were two of Australia's major beer producers, Lion Nathan and Foster's, who released the first Australian Government Greenhouse Friendly[TM]...
Guardians of the Electric Reef: In Bali's Idyllic North-West Corner, a Unique Community-Driven Marine Conservation Project Is Using Electricity to Rapidly Regrow Damaged Coral Reef and Restore Local Livelihoods. Might This Technology and Its Profound Success Be a Route to Helping Save the Earth's Vital Coral Gardens?
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] At Pemuteran, five hours driving northwest of Denpasar's action, the silhouettes of lava's massive volcanoes set the dramatic backdrop to a proud fishing community, its traditionally painted luggers pulled up on the beach....
Lessons from Cyclone Larry
Nearly three years after Cyclone Larry cut a swathe through the town of Innisfail and the tropical rainforests of Far North Queensland, the landscape is recovering. But what lessons have been learnt for future management? Severe Tropical Cyclone...
New Tactics for the Camel Plague
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Camels have no Dreaming, say Aboriginal people; they don't belong in country. But more than a million camels roam through much of central Australia, and next year there will be 80 000 more as the population doubles by the...
Our Options for Global C[O.Sub.2] Drawdown: If Rates of Global C[O.Sub.2] Emissions Continue to Climb, Ways to Rapidly Withdraw the Gas from the Atmosphere May Be Needed. Do We Have Them?
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Despite plans and initiatives to reduce the amount of carbon dioxide being pumped into Earth's atmosphere, C[O.sub.2] emissions actually increased by 3 per cent each year from 2000 to 2007, a finding that shocked researchers...
Protection Not Working for PNG's Forests: Papua New Guinea's Forests Are Not as Pristine as Previously Thought and If Current Rates of Destruction Continue, by 2020 Their Area Will Be Reduced by Half, According to a Recent Analysis of 30 Years' Aerial and Satellite Imagery of the Region. Disturbingly, Much of the Damage Appears Due to Unsustainable Practices by Local Communities, Sometimes Inside Nominally Protected Areas
Papua New Guinea (PNG) is one of the world's most forested countries. In 2002, 33 million hectares--71 per cent--of the country was covered in forests, ranging from rainforest to swamp forest, evergreen forest and mangroves. Over the last 10 000...
Save Water, Save Energy: Message to Cities
A new report by CSIRO and the Water Services Association of Australia (WSAA)--'Energy use in the provision and consumption of urban water in Australia and New Zealand'--shows a strong nexus between water and energy. 'Ensuring a reliable water supply...
Seeing Northern Rivers through Indigenous Eyes
Through a new study set to transform the way catchments are managed, researchers are tapping into Indigenous knowledge to document the value of northern tropical rivers, estuaries and billabongs to traditional communities. Indigenous people are...
Sustainability Assessment: Accounting for the Triple Bottom Line
Sustainable development requires a broader approach to policy and new criteria to measure 'progress'. But how do you weigh up the economic value of relevant ecosystem goods and services against their environmental value, or the 'public good', in this...
Tech Insight to Tasmania's Roadkill Hotspots
Driving past an animal carcass on the road is a stark reminder of the impact humans have on the environment. Concern for wildlife deaths on our roads is high among many Australians, but what can we do to reduce this problem? In Tasmania, the level...
Ten Years of Serving Up Sustainability on the Streets
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The annual Sustainable Living Festival is probably the only place in Australia where you'll find the Reverend Tim Costello rubbing shoulders with sustainable clothing fashionistas, or singer Paul Kelly on the same program...
The Dingo's Role Revitalised
The dingo has had a bad rap in Australia, but new research on its benefits for native ecosystems may give the dingo something to howl about. Ninian Stewart-Moore and his wife, Ann, run Dunluce, a 46 500 hectare sheep and cattle station in north-west...
Tracking Bigger Wave Action
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Considering Australia is an island continent with a largely coastal population, little attention has so far been paid to how ocean and wave behaviour influenced by shifting and more intense storm systems under climate change...
White Paper Response: 'Timely Start, but We Could Do Better'
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Since the federal government released its White Paper outlining a carbon pollution reduction scheme (CPRS) for Australia in December, the response from environmental and public policy experts has been consistent--introducing...