Melbourne Journal of International Law

Melbourne Journal of International Law is a magazine specializing in law topics.

Articles from Vol. 11, No. 1, May

Fly Me to the Moon: How Will International Law Cope with Commercial Space Tourism?
The recent confirmation by National Aeronautics and Space Administration scientists regarding the presence of substantial amounts of water on the Moon has further galvanised the aim of humankind to develop ever more ambitious plans for space travel....
Implied External Limitations on the Right to Cross-Examine Prosecution Witnesses: The Tension between a Means Test and a Balancing Test in the Appraisal of Anonymity Requests
Both the ad hoc Tribunals and the International Criminal Court have admitted implied external limits to the right of cross-examination by resorting to an extra-textual interpretation of their statutes. The International Criminal Tribunal for the former...
Law and the Mekong River Basin: A Socio-Legal Research Agenda on the Role of Hard and Soft Law in Regulating Transboundary Water Resources
This commentary sketches a research agenda for mapping the normative networks through which debates concerning transboundary water resources in the Mekong River Basin are being conducted, particularly those networks' transnational legal dimensions....
Law, Legitimacy and United Nations
The gulf between law and legitimacy--a distinction popularised in the context of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's intervention in Kosovo in 1999--is a more serious crisis-in-the-making for the United Nations than is commonly realised. The reason...
Squaring Free Trade in Culture with Chinese Censorship: The WTO Appellate Body Report on China - Audiovisuals
CONTENTS I Introduction II Background and Summary of the Dispute III Is a Film a 'Good' or a 'Service'? The Technological Bias and Neutrality of GATT and GATS A Distinguishing 'Good' from 'Service' in the WTO after China--Audiovisuals...
The International Law Aspects of the Case of the Balibo Five
On 16 November 2007, Ms Dorelle Pinch. as Deputy Coroner. found that the five Australian-based journalists at Balibo. the 'Balibo Five', had been deliberately killed by members of the Indonesian Special Forces to prevent them from revealing that such...
The Laws of War and the Fight against Somali Piracy: Combatants or Criminals?
Despite its codification in treaty law, the law applicable to the repression of high seas piracy remains a subject of unnecessary confusion and speculation. It is sometimes suggested that because pirates were described by classical authors as hostes...
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