The Hudson Review

Articles from Vol. 57, No. 4, Winter

A Completely Determined Human Being
Something of the quality of Penelope Fitzgerald's mind may be gleaned from the index of The Knox Brothers, the biography of her father and three uncles that she wrote in 1977. Her multiple entries for each man include, unexpectedly, a separate list of...
Anniversary Triolets
After an AnniversaryThey find themselves, as couples often do,betrayed, betraying, falling out, apart,their traitor hearts preparing for a coup.They find themselves, as couples often do,searching through the wreckage for some clue,some warning sign,...
Anthony Powell and His Critics
Anthony Powell and His CriticsANTHONY POWELL DIED IN MARCH OF 2000, months short of what would have been his ninety-fifth birthday in December. Since a fall some years previously, he had largely been confined to his home at The Chantry in Somerset. The...
A Poem of Pure Enjoyment
A Poem of Pure EnjoymentTwo MAJOR AMERICAN POEMS WERE PUBLISHED IN 1855. One we still read today, the other we only refer to. One marks the beginning not only of modern American poetry, but American poetry distinct from English poetry. The other marks...
Chopin at Carnegie Hall
Chopin at Carnegie HallRARELY TODAY DOES ONE ATTEND, in New York, a piano recital at which Chopin is not on the program. More rarely still does one hear, outside of Europe, Chopin played on a piano other than a Steinway. The present music chronicle is...
Group Grief
In the elevator going down from the 17th floor everyone is crying. My Bereavement Support Group has just let out. The Visiting Nurse Service of New York runs two groups: one is for adults whose parents have died, the other is for adults whose life partner...
MoMA Plus
MoMA PlusTHE BIG NEWS OF THE PAST SEASON WAS, of course, the much-anticipated reopening of the new, enlarged and refurbished Museum of Modern Art. "Have you seen it yet?" was the question most heard at almost any gathering in the weeks surrounding November...
Music Chronicle
Music ChronicleLORIN MAAZEL, HEARING THE END OF HIS THIRD YEAR as music director of the New York Philharmonic, has clearly put his stamp on the orchestra. He is a conductor of bold gestures, not averse to sacrificing spontaneity for micromanagement of...
Reloading That Gun: Reading an Old Poem as If It Matters
It is tempting, if you read Emily Dickinson, and especially if you write about her or try to teach her poems in classes, to cheat; that is, to ignore the ways in which she is not like you, not, for instance, comfortably non-religious, not feminist in...
Slightly Far East
It's the Sunday evening before the first day of school. The year is 1956, and I'm going into the eighth grade, my sister Janet into the fifth, but at the moment we're sitting with our parents out on the terrace of the Officers' Club, a horizontal wedge...
Swimming Lessons
Swimming LessonsFROM LATE SPRING TO EARLY AUTUMN, I SWAM IN A SEA OF FICTION. Stroking through dozens of books, some of which were good, a couple of which were brilliant, and most of which were merely competent or worse, I came up for air only to start...
The Caprichos
With a needleon a metal plateGoya etches a manwho has been garrotedby the Spanish Inquisition.The left leg is relaxed,the right as stiff as a board,the big toe sticking out at an angle.It's better than being hanged,Goya says. I shall try to believe it.Ah,...
The Negative Style of David Foster Wallace
The Negative Style of David Foster WallaceREADERS OF FICTION, LIKE THE HEROINES OF CHILDREN'S FANTASIES, are always waking up bearing souvenirs from their dreams. Fiction's great gift is that it allows us to carry the unreal acquisitions we make in it,...
The Violence of the Christ
The Violence of the ChristAs MY TITLE INDICATES, I WANT TO CONSIDER MeI Gibson's The Passion of the Christ1 from the point of view of its violence-the relentless violence to which this film subjects both Jesus and the viewer. I have no interest in the...
War Fever
War FeverGEORGE W. BUSH MAY BE THE MOST SATIRIZED PRESIDENT since Abraham Lincoln, yet as with Lincoln, the satire rarely seems to affect its intended victim. It is all too easy to ridicule Bush's shifty eyes and stumbling tongue, while his history of...