JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance

The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance (JOPERD) is a monthly journal owned and published since 1896 by the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation & Dance (AAHPERD) headquartered in Reston, Va. JOPERD is AAHPERD's largest, most frequently published, and most wide-ranging periodical. It is AAHPERD's cornerstone journal, reaching 12,000+ members and subscribers, providing information on a variety of health, physical education, recreation and dance issues. Subscribers are professionals supporting those involved in physical education, leisure, fitness, dance, health promotion, sport and education—all specialties related to achieving a healthy lifestyle. The region covered by this journal is the US.Recent issues of JOPERD have included articles on teaching strategies, fitness, legal issues, assessment, dancing, teacher education, adapted physical education, leisure for older adults, the use of technology, and ethics and gender equity in sports and physical education. In January 2002, JOPERD featured an article on the benefits of physical exercise in reducing breast cancer risk. In April 2007, JOPERD ran a series of articles on obesity, including the mental aspects of obesity, early childhood obesity intervention and online sources of information on the epidemic. In October 2009, JOPERD included an article on the gender gap in youth sports, particularly in urban communities. This was based on the results of Go Out and Play: Youth Sports in America, a comprehensive study based on two nationwide surveys of youth sports participation. Michael T. Shoemaker is the Editor, and Laura Stecker is the Associate Editor. Contributing editors are Derrick Mears, Ferman Konukman, Thomas H. Sawyer and Susan F. Ayers.

Articles from Vol. 72, No. 4, April

Can the Physical Education for Progress (PEP) Act Counter Local Cutbacks in Physical Education Programs?
According to a recent Boston Globe article, the state of Massachusetts has reduced many of its schools' physical education programs to "token gestures" of late. Many schools now have inadequately scheduled programs that fail to benefit students' health...
Coaching Strategies for Youth Sports
Part 1: Athlete Behavior and Athlete Performance Millions of young people participate in organized sports during a period of their lives that is critical to their personal development. Thus, the role of the sport coach is very important to society....
Connecting Physical Education to the Lives of Urban High School Students
Physical education experiences, and school experiences in general, need to connect to students' lives in order to promote student engagement. When students feel personally connected to school and physical education, they are more likely to actively...
Digitizing Video
Video is an invaluable means of sharing information. According to Videonics (1997), "[t]he ability to deliver customized video clips in minutes to individual users has enormous potential benefit." Many people now have World Wide Web access, which allows...
If You Let Them Play, They Will
The current environment surrounding public school physical education programs is both exciting and dangerous. On the one hand we have increasing interest in recreational activities and sports, and on the other a constant clamor for fiscal accountability,...
Is There a Place for Dodgeball in Physical Education?
Understanding I am committing professional heresy, I believe there is a place for dodgeball in physical education. There are very few activities, if any, that are inherently good or bad. It is how an activity is used, with whom it is used, and how...
Observational Tools for Teacher Reflection
Teaching physical education is complex work. Space, time, equipment, and people must be managed, differing ability levels must be considered, and behavioral problems must be resolved. Teachers deal with these and other challenges in every class period....
Outdoor Education: Learning to Love Recreation
Recent surveys have shown that fewer Americans are eager to participate in outdoor activities such as canoeing and hiking, and it may be up to schools to educate the next generation about the values of such recreation. Now more than ever, outdoor recreation...
Role Modeling in HPERD: Do Attitudes Match Behavior?
Modeling behaviors that pro mote physical activity and fitness is a core principle for those involved in health, physical education, recreation, and dance (HPERD). This assertion is supported in the vision statement of AAHPERD (1998): AAHPERD envisions...
Safe Use of Pesticides in Athletic Facilities
A high-school running back tackled face down on the field is probably more worried about finding the first-down marker than anything else. However, a recent commentary by the American College of Sports Medicine may give that player one more thing to...
Spectator Insurance and Contest Participants
Spectator participation contests frequently occur during the inter mission periods of sports events. For example, minor-league baseball teams have offered "Kids-Run-the-Bases" activities, and hockey teams have invited spectators to race tricycles on...
The Language of Dance
Is dance a "language"? Should dance be included in events such as the recently inaugurated Bethesda (Maryland) Literary Festival? Why not? In this article, I will explain how die body language of dance not only resembles verbal language, but also influences...
The Student-Teaching Experience
The student-teaching experience is often thought to be the most important part of teacher education programs (Cruickshank & Aramalin, 1986; Tannehill & Zakrajsek, 1988). Many teacher educators believe that preservice teachers begin to develop...
Three Non-Curricular Issues in Teaching
Do teacher education programs prepare prospective educators to effectively address non-curricular issues that influence teaching and student achievement? The following discussion of three such issues--learning disabilities, social bias, and cultural...
Using Physical Activity Homework to Meet the National Standards
The third of the seven national standards for physical education defines a physically educated person as one who exhibits a physically active lifestyle (National Association for Sport and Physical Education [NASPE], 1995). This standard indicates that...