JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance

The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance (JOPERD) is a monthly journal owned and published since 1896 by the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation & Dance (AAHPERD) headquartered in Reston, Va. JOPERD is AAHPERD's largest, most frequently published, and most wide-ranging periodical. It is AAHPERD's cornerstone journal, reaching 12,000+ members and subscribers, providing information on a variety of health, physical education, recreation and dance issues. Subscribers are professionals supporting those involved in physical education, leisure, fitness, dance, health promotion, sport and education—all specialties related to achieving a healthy lifestyle. The region covered by this journal is the US.Recent issues of JOPERD have included articles on teaching strategies, fitness, legal issues, assessment, dancing, teacher education, adapted physical education, leisure for older adults, the use of technology, and ethics and gender equity in sports and physical education. In January 2002, JOPERD featured an article on the benefits of physical exercise in reducing breast cancer risk. In April 2007, JOPERD ran a series of articles on obesity, including the mental aspects of obesity, early childhood obesity intervention and online sources of information on the epidemic. In October 2009, JOPERD included an article on the gender gap in youth sports, particularly in urban communities. This was based on the results of Go Out and Play: Youth Sports in America, a comprehensive study based on two nationwide surveys of youth sports participation. Michael T. Shoemaker is the Editor, and Laura Stecker is the Associate Editor. Contributing editors are Derrick Mears, Ferman Konukman, Thomas H. Sawyer and Susan F. Ayers.

Articles from Vol. 82, No. 4, April

A Critical Look at Physical Education and What Must Be Done to Address Obesity Issues: The Survival of Physical Education May Depend on Educational Reform
Physical education (PE) and physical education teacher education (PETE) are no strangers to change over the past 100 years, growing and morphing in order to meet changing societal interests and demands. From its beginnings in the late 19th century...
Fire Prevention Week from a Physical Educator's Perspective
The fire alarm sounds and fire and emergency medical service (EMS) personnel scramble to put on their gear and run to their equipment in anticipation of the forthcoming event. The call comes in: a structure fire with trapped individuals. Hearts race,...
Games and Activities for Introducing Karate to Early Elementary Students: You Can Teach Yourself Basic Techniques That Can Be Passed on to Your Students
Karate is an Okinawan martial art that was first introduced in Japan in 1922 by Gichin Funakoshi (Funakoshi, 1973; Mood, Musker, & Rink, 2007). Karate literally means "empty hand," and it is characterized by unarmed techniques such as blocks, punches,...
Graduate Teaching-Assistant Development in College and University Instructional Physical Activity Programs: Finding, Training, and Supervising Instructors Poses a Major Challenge Addressed by This Model Program
College and university instructional physical activity programs (C/UIPAPs)--also known as physical activity, service, basic, or general physical education programs--have been a part of the general curriculum at institutions of higher education for...
Initiating and Strengthening College and University Instructional Physical Activity Programs: The Development of Physical Activity Programs in Higher Education Has Been Hindered by a Number of Myths
No one in our profession would argue against the idea that we need quality physical education programs in our K-12 schools. Physical education programs are not only valuable for the health and fitness of K-12 students, but for the numerous other benefits...
Introduction: Appropriate Programs Can Satisfy the Unique Activity Needs of Post-Secondary Students
The research and professional attention given to the physical activity needs and interventions of post-secondary students has been sporadic. In 1985, it was reported that the most rapid decline in physical activity patterns occurred during late adolescence...
Sovereign Immunity
Noble v. West Clermont Local School District 914 N.E. 2nd 1128, decided July 17, 2009 James Noble, Jr., a public high school student, suffered a dislocated elbow while participating with other students in a martial arts course on school grounds....
Staving off Complacency concerning Title IX
With the recent success of the University of Connecticut Women's basketball team and the headlines it generated, some might be lured into thinking that there are no longer gender equity issues in athletics. Without a doubt, women's participation in...
Teaching the Self-Contained Adapted Physical Education Class: Each Student Has Unique Needs and Skills That Should Be Addressed Individually
Many students with moderate to severe physical or intellectual disabilities are placed in self-contained classes for their school day. These self-contained classes are known as functional skills class, community-based instruction, or simply the class...
To Be Skilled or Not to Be Skilled-That Is the Question
Do physical education teachers need to be skilled in order to be competent teachers? This question has been asked for as long as I can remember. Like Hamlet in his famous soliloquy, physical education teacher education (PETE) professionals struggle...
Utilizing Technology to Improve the Administration of Instructional Physical Activity Programs in Higher Education: Spend More Time on Physical Activity and Less on Tasks That Can Be Completed Via Technology
Information and communication technology has been integrated into many different educational arenas. The National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE, 2007) recently released guidelines for the appropriate use of technology in physical...
What Are the Most Effective and Ineffective Ways of Advocating for Physical Education and Physical Activity?
The critical first step toward advocacy is to build a quality program in your gym that conforms to appropriate practices. Doing so means you practice what you preach, and as students learn in and enjoy the program, they become advocates for physical...