JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance

The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance (JOPERD) is a monthly journal owned and published since 1896 by the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation & Dance (AAHPERD) headquartered in Reston, Va. JOPERD is AAHPERD's largest, most frequently published, and most wide-ranging periodical. It is AAHPERD's cornerstone journal, reaching 12,000+ members and subscribers, providing information on a variety of health, physical education, recreation and dance issues. Subscribers are professionals supporting those involved in physical education, leisure, fitness, dance, health promotion, sport and education—all specialties related to achieving a healthy lifestyle. The region covered by this journal is the US.Recent issues of JOPERD have included articles on teaching strategies, fitness, legal issues, assessment, dancing, teacher education, adapted physical education, leisure for older adults, the use of technology, and ethics and gender equity in sports and physical education. In January 2002, JOPERD featured an article on the benefits of physical exercise in reducing breast cancer risk. In April 2007, JOPERD ran a series of articles on obesity, including the mental aspects of obesity, early childhood obesity intervention and online sources of information on the epidemic. In October 2009, JOPERD included an article on the gender gap in youth sports, particularly in urban communities. This was based on the results of Go Out and Play: Youth Sports in America, a comprehensive study based on two nationwide surveys of youth sports participation. Michael T. Shoemaker is the Editor, and Laura Stecker is the Associate Editor. Contributing editors are Derrick Mears, Ferman Konukman, Thomas H. Sawyer and Susan F. Ayers.

Articles from Vol. 69, No. 3, March

A Concise Guide for the Teacher-Coach to Successfully Observe and Correct Motor Skills
Observing and correcting a motor skill is a skill in itself, and like any skill, the more you practice, the better you become. By practicing, you will be able to learn the basic skill patterns and the basic common errors performed by the participants...
Appropriate Physical Education Practices for Pregnant Adolescents
Although recent national statistics demonstrate a slight decrease in teenage birthrates, they are still higher than they were two decades ago (National Center for Health Statistics, 1996). Teenage birthrates (per 1,000 women by age group) by state range...
Aquatics - HPERD Linkage to Health and Human Services
A number of individuals with increasingly intense health and human service needs are and will be living out their lives in the community. Cost containment practices, quality improvement initiatives, and managed care programs have reduced the length of...
Authentic Assessment in Adapted Physical Education
For several years now, there has been a growing dissatisfaction with how assessment is conducted and how assessment data are used in adapted physical education. Four problems in particular seem to have surfaced in the assessment literature. First, there...
Enhancing the Student-Teaching Experience through the Internet
Though the student-teaching experience is a challenging and exciting time for most preservice teachers, they often begin this period with high stress levels. Paese and Zinkgraf (1991) suggest that these may be alleviated through supervision. The responsibility...
How Physically Active Are Students during Recess Periods?
Physical education and recess are the two periods during the school day where children are given the opportunity to be physically active. Many school administrators believe that recess provides a valid alternative to physical education. The purpose...
Keep Them in Their "Place": Applying Laban's Notion of Kinesphere and Place in Teaching Scientific Concepts
Most physical educators analyze hundreds of movements a day. We know about follow-through, center of gravity, inertia, spatial relationships, force, timing, and flow. And we often struggle with how to teach and practically apply the principles of science...
New Learning Horizons for Older Adults
In the first half of the century, Canadian education was mostly about schools. There were elementary schools, secondary schools, specialty schools, a few colleges, and some universities. For the most part, these were community-based institutions where...
Preparing Preservice Physical Educators to Teach a Concepts-Based Fitness Course
Today, many colleges and universities in the United States offer a concepts-based physical education course entitled "Lifetime Fitness," "Fitness for Life," or something similar, in which students engage in physical activity two days a week and attend...
Should Students with Disabilities Be Allowed to Try out for and Compete on School Athletic Teams or Should Schools Be Responsible for Providing Extracurricular Athletic Options for Those Students with Disabilities?
Of course students with disabilities should be allowed to try out for and compete on athletic teams and schools must provide options for students with disabilities. If the question was: should students who are black...or students who are girls...the...
Stretching: From Science to Practice
The use of stretching in sport and physical education has often been based more on myth than on scientific evidence For example, many professionals still do not know that muscle-tendon units (MTUs) can be injured when stretching during warm-up. Flexibility...
The Joy of Learning in Retirement
Throughout the United States and Canada, an unconventional type of school has been quietly gaining popularity. It is known as an institute for learning in retirement. Henry David Thoreau did not know this term in 1854, but he certainly had the vision...