JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance

The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance (JOPERD) is a monthly journal owned and published since 1896 by the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation & Dance (AAHPERD) headquartered in Reston, Va. JOPERD is AAHPERD's largest, most frequently published, and most wide-ranging periodical. It is AAHPERD's cornerstone journal, reaching 12,000+ members and subscribers, providing information on a variety of health, physical education, recreation and dance issues. Subscribers are professionals supporting those involved in physical education, leisure, fitness, dance, health promotion, sport and education—all specialties related to achieving a healthy lifestyle. The region covered by this journal is the US.Recent issues of JOPERD have included articles on teaching strategies, fitness, legal issues, assessment, dancing, teacher education, adapted physical education, leisure for older adults, the use of technology, and ethics and gender equity in sports and physical education. In January 2002, JOPERD featured an article on the benefits of physical exercise in reducing breast cancer risk. In April 2007, JOPERD ran a series of articles on obesity, including the mental aspects of obesity, early childhood obesity intervention and online sources of information on the epidemic. In October 2009, JOPERD included an article on the gender gap in youth sports, particularly in urban communities. This was based on the results of Go Out and Play: Youth Sports in America, a comprehensive study based on two nationwide surveys of youth sports participation. Michael T. Shoemaker is the Editor, and Laura Stecker is the Associate Editor. Contributing editors are Derrick Mears, Ferman Konukman, Thomas H. Sawyer and Susan F. Ayers.

Articles from Vol. 70, No. 3, March

Assumption of Risk: Sandler V. Half Hollows Hills West High School
Sandler v. Half Hollows Hills Wesr High School, et al. United States Supreme Court, Appellate Division, Second Department, New York April 27, 1988. 672 N.Y.S.2d 120, 1998 WL 208653 (N.Y.A.D. 2 Dept.) In September 1993, Sherry Sandler, a 15-year-old...
Can Cardiovascular Disease and Wellness Education, along with a Physical Education Program, Lessen Children's Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factor?
There is growing recognition that the atherosclerotic process often begins in youth. The risk factors (high lipids, obesity, physical inactivity, and smoking) that cause atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease tend to continue into adulthood. It...
Issues in Abdominal Fitness: Testing and Technique
Assessing muscular function for the purpose of determining fitness levels and prescribing training is an important part of the physical education curriculum. Muscle strength is defined as the maximum force or torque produced by a muscle group in isometric...
More B-Boat: The Volleyball Spike
Is it a kill, or did the ball once again go flying over the opponents heads and land somewhere on the far side of the gym? What went wrong, and what can you tell your players to improve their skill at spiking? The volleyball spike is a complex skill...
Physical Activity for Women: What Park and Recreation Departments Can Do
The following two articles conclude a three-part Leisure Today feature on the role of parks and recreation professionals in promoting the physical activity objectives of the 1996 Surgeon General's report on physical activity and health. In the January...
Physical Activity Programs and Policies: Toward an Infrastructure for Healthy Lifestyles
This feature focuses on the implications of the Surgeon General's report on physical activity and health (U.S. 'Department of Health and Human Services [USDHHS], 1996) and the subsequent recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...
Promoting the Physical Activity Objectives in the Surgeon General's Report: A Summary
Park and recreation department personnel in counties and municipalities have a role to play in assuring that residents have spaces and opportunities to be physically active. This is not a new idea. Staff in park and recreation programs, however, must...
Refining Skill in Educational Gymnastics: Seeing Quality through Variety
Teachers use refining tasks to improve the quality of student performance (Parson, 1998; Rink, 1993; Seidentop, 1991). For example, a teacher may ask a group of students involved in a tennis lesson to focus on swinging their racket from low to high...
The Benefits of Assessing Eye Dominance in Motor Skill Instruction
Are some of your students having trouble hitting a tennis ball consistently despite your best and most creative teaching? Are others having trouble hitting a softball? The culprit in these motor skill difficulties could be the eye-dominance of the...
The Individualized Education Program in Physical Education: A Guide for Regular Physical Educators
Bob Thomas has been teaching at Susan B. Anthony Elementary School for the past 14 years. Bob has had little contact with children with disabilities, as they have previously been taught by an adapted physical education specialist. Recently, Bob's principal...
The Surgeon General's Report and Leisure Services for Older Adults
The following two articles conclude a three-part feature on the role of HPERD professionals in addressing the issues raised by the 1996 Surgeon General's report on physical activity and health. In the January issue, after an introduction by feature...
Using Multimedia Programming to Teach Sport Skills
When considering the term "multimedia" one may think only of commercial products from major software producers. This conception is only partially correct. In schools across America, a myriad of multimedia software applications are being produced by...
Why Do We Teach Sports?
Why do we teach sports? This is a seldom-asked question. Do we truly have a reason for teaching sports and physical education in our schools? The benefits of physical activity have been summarized in the Surgeon General's report (U.S. Department of...