JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance

The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance (JOPERD) is a monthly journal owned and published since 1896 by the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation & Dance (AAHPERD) headquartered in Reston, Va. JOPERD is AAHPERD's largest, most frequently published, and most wide-ranging periodical. It is AAHPERD's cornerstone journal, reaching 12,000+ members and subscribers, providing information on a variety of health, physical education, recreation and dance issues. Subscribers are professionals supporting those involved in physical education, leisure, fitness, dance, health promotion, sport and education—all specialties related to achieving a healthy lifestyle. The region covered by this journal is the US.Recent issues of JOPERD have included articles on teaching strategies, fitness, legal issues, assessment, dancing, teacher education, adapted physical education, leisure for older adults, the use of technology, and ethics and gender equity in sports and physical education. In January 2002, JOPERD featured an article on the benefits of physical exercise in reducing breast cancer risk. In April 2007, JOPERD ran a series of articles on obesity, including the mental aspects of obesity, early childhood obesity intervention and online sources of information on the epidemic. In October 2009, JOPERD included an article on the gender gap in youth sports, particularly in urban communities. This was based on the results of Go Out and Play: Youth Sports in America, a comprehensive study based on two nationwide surveys of youth sports participation. Michael T. Shoemaker is the Editor, and Laura Stecker is the Associate Editor. Contributing editors are Derrick Mears, Ferman Konukman, Thomas H. Sawyer and Susan F. Ayers.

Articles from Vol. 81, No. 8, October

A Panel of Experts Discusses the Pros and Cons of Specializing Early
Introduction [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] A growing trend among today's youths is the specialization in one sport or in one position in a sport, at increasingly younger ages, in order to compete at the highest levels. According...
Concluding Comments and Recommendations: After Reviewing the Evidence, It's Up to You to Decide What Is Best
Using the expertise from the academy interest areas of the National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE), the 2010 All-Academy Symposium and this feature set out to discern the promises and pitfalls of youth sport specialization. We...
Early Specialization in Youth Sport: A Biomechanical Perspective: The Value of Early Specialization Appears to Be Sport-Specific
Early specialization is characterized by participation in specific, intense training for a single sport at a competitive level at an early age (Baker, Cobley & Fraser-Thomas, 2009). The theory of deliberate practice supports early specialization...
Early Sport Specialization: A Psychological Perspective: Early Specialization Does Not Guarantee Later Sport Success
A recent study of issues and concerns related to contemporary school sports revealed that key constituency groups (coaches, athletic directors, school principals, parents of high school athletes, student-athletes) felt that there was pressure on scholastic...
Frameworks for Diagnosing Student Performance Problems in Striking/fielding and Target Games: With These Frameworks, Pinpointing Performance Problems and Finding Solutions Just Became Easier
The teaching games for understanding (TGFU) model has been increasingly incorporated into physical education curricula around the world since 1982. The model focuses on the understanding of games through problem solving and decision making. Although...
Hidden Disabilities in Youth Sport
Not too long ago an experienced youth sport coach asked where in the coaching literature he could find strategies to work with an athlete diagnosed with a learning disability. Within a few weeks, two more veteran coaches asked about resources related...
How to Raise the Status of Physical Education at Your School: Physical Education Deserves to Be Taken Seriously
"We are going to have an assembly in the gym today. But it doesn't matter, it's just PE, and you can teach that somewhere else, right?" Initially, statements like this from a classroom teacher or administrator may seem harmless, and the chances...
Impact of Early Sport Specialization: A Physiological Perspective: From a Physiological Standpoint, the Benefits of Early Specialization Are Unsubstantiated
Participation in physical activity and sports is highly encouraged for children and can provide numerous physical, psychosocial, and health benefits. In addition to developing sport-specific skills, sport participation can also foster the growth of...
Is Anyone Conducting Training Studies with Female Athletes Anymore?
At the 2009 Women's Breakfast of the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA), I was struck by a comment that one of the featured speakers made. She boldly asserted that "there are no researchers--especially females--who are conducting...
Practice Makes Perfect and Other Curricular Myths in the Sport Specialization Debate: Appropriate Coaching Can Make All the Difference
The common debate regarding the utility of sport specialization begins with the notion that early talent identification, mixed with early sport-specific training will result in improved long-term sport performance. This assumption is based on the notion...
Public Entity Immunity Upheld against Wrongful Death Action
Douglas v. City & County of Denver 203 P.3d 615 2008 Colo. App. LEXIS 1927 The parents of a 21-year-old man with Down syndrome brought a wrongful death action against the young man's employer, the Southwest Denver Recreational Center (SWDRC),...
Rating Carbohydrates for Heart Health
Rating Carbohydrates for Heart Health A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (June, 2010) provides evidence that some carbohydrates are even worse for heart health than saturated fat. For decades people have been following...
Should Coaches Use Dance as a Form of Athletic Development?
That JOPERD would even ask this question reveals how we have failed to teach the importance of movement education to coaches and teachers of physical education. The history of coaches using dance as a form of athletic development has a long and meaningful...
Sport Specialization: Developmental and Learning Issues: Early Specialization May Limit a Child's Acquisition of Fundamental Motor Skills
When addressing issues related to sport specialization, it is important to consider how skills are developed and learned. Changes in physical development and maturation throughout the growing years affect the motor performance abilities of individuals...
Teachers and Coaches as Leaders Demonstrating Character and Competence: As Leaders, Teachers and Coaches Have the Opportunity to Develop the Moral Courage of Their Students and Athletes
The media regularly reports on scandalous behaviors of corporate officers, corruption in politics and the legal system, and financial scams. Daily the unethical actions of individuals seeking to gain personal advantages adversely affect others. Because...
Teaching T-Ball to Young Children
T-Ball is often thought of as an appropriate activity for higher elementary grades (3rd-5th), because swinging a bat and throwing and catching a ball can be difficult skills for students ages three through eight (PreK-2nd). Simple modifications, however,...
The "Logic" of Specialization: Using Children for Adult Purposes: How and Why Did Year-Round Specialization in a Single Sport Become Common for So Many Children?
It was not too long ago that the best athlete was the one who played multiple sports and had all-around skills. Lettering in three sports was an admired feat in high schools, and the decathlete who could sprint, jump, run, and endure was the epitome...