JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance

The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance (JOPERD) is a monthly journal owned and published since 1896 by the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation & Dance (AAHPERD) headquartered in Reston, Va. JOPERD is AAHPERD's largest, most frequently published, and most wide-ranging periodical. It is AAHPERD's cornerstone journal, reaching 12,000+ members and subscribers, providing information on a variety of health, physical education, recreation and dance issues. Subscribers are professionals supporting those involved in physical education, leisure, fitness, dance, health promotion, sport and education—all specialties related to achieving a healthy lifestyle. The region covered by this journal is the US.Recent issues of JOPERD have included articles on teaching strategies, fitness, legal issues, assessment, dancing, teacher education, adapted physical education, leisure for older adults, the use of technology, and ethics and gender equity in sports and physical education. In January 2002, JOPERD featured an article on the benefits of physical exercise in reducing breast cancer risk. In April 2007, JOPERD ran a series of articles on obesity, including the mental aspects of obesity, early childhood obesity intervention and online sources of information on the epidemic. In October 2009, JOPERD included an article on the gender gap in youth sports, particularly in urban communities. This was based on the results of Go Out and Play: Youth Sports in America, a comprehensive study based on two nationwide surveys of youth sports participation. Michael T. Shoemaker is the Editor, and Laura Stecker is the Associate Editor. Contributing editors are Derrick Mears, Ferman Konukman, Thomas H. Sawyer and Susan F. Ayers.

Articles from Vol. 83, No. 7, September

Does Technology in Physical Education Enhance or Increase the Time Available to Engage in Physical Activity?
My first reaction to this question was "What a silly question; the time available to engage in physical activity is set (50 minutes = 50 minutes), so technology use cannot increase or decrease physical activity time." However, my experiences are that...
Family and Community Involvement in the Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program: The Least Implemented Component of a Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program Engaging Families and Communities-May Be the Most Important
The critical role of families in the development of a child is undeniable (Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2011). Daily family routines establish norms, influence behavioral patterns, and shape the "typical" lifestyle for children....
Google Groups
Collegial interaction is one of the many workplace conditions that have been identified as an influence on teacher effectiveness and job satisfaction (Stroot, Collier, O'Sullivan, & England, 1994). Unfortunately, many teachers develop few collegial...
Have You Taken Your Vacation Yet?
I love vacations. Especially the ones with old friends--you know, the friends that you rarely talk to, but sure enough when vacation time comes they join the fun, no questions asked. The conversations (and debates) pick up right where they left off,...
How Do High School Girls Feel about Different Physical Activities?
What Was the Question? Because it is widely reported that high school students are not very active and generally do not remain physically active outside school settings, Wilkinson and Bretzing (2011) tried to determine which physical activities...
Making It Happen: These Suggestions May Help to Change the Paradigm
The articles in this feature have described a staff development program designed to certify physical education teachers to be directors of physical activity (DPA) and the role of the DPA in implementing a Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program...
Maximizing Legislative Opportunities for School Physical Education Reform
The obesity epidemic is one of the most commonly cited reasons that investigators use for defending the significance of studies on physical activity. Similarly, physical education teachers often use it to justify the existence of their programs to...
Planning a Service-Learning Program to Benefit Children with Disabilities: While Filling the Activity Gap for Underserved Children with Disabilities, University Students Gain Valuable Experience in Applying the Skills They Have Learned
Volunteerism is a very important form of public service in the United States. Many volunteer organizations (e.g., American Red Cross, Boys and Girls Club, Rotary Club) provide services to those in need, and many members donate their time and resources...
Responsibilities for Spectator and Player Contact
On February 11, 2005, Syracuse University (SU) played host to Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania for a men's club hockey game at SU's Tennity Ice Pavilion. O'Connor, the plaintiff and father of an SU player, was sitting in the stands near the...
Switch-Making Change Happen
Ever wonder why it is so hard to get people to change their exercise or eating habits when the evidence of the benefits are clear and well documented (Otten, Hellwig, & Meyers, 2006; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2008)? Are you...
Table Top Tennis a Vehicle for Teaching Sportspersonship and Responsibility: This Innovative Activity Requires Little Equipment and Can Be Played in the Classroom or Lunchroom
It is election day, and your gym becomes the voting place for the local congressional district. Paintings featured in the annual art show, or tables of books for the annual PTA book fair, occupy your gym for a week in the spring. During school assembly...
Teaching Students to Think Critically about Fitness and Wellness Choices: By Learning How to Think, Students Are More Likely to Base Their Decisions on Facts and Logic
Physical educators have, over the years, witnessed the consequences of the poor health decisions that high school and college students make over and over again and often shake their heads in disbelief. After all, physical educators try to teach good...
The Director of Physical Activity and Staff Involvement: Part Teacher, Part Cheerleader, the Director of Physical Activity Will Need to Involve the School Staff to Make the Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program Successful
The following three articles complete this two-part feature. In the August issue, after an introduction by Feature Editor Judith Rink, Russell Carson explained the certification process and duties of a director of physical activity (DPA). Next, Darla...
Using Partnerships to Promote Health and Physical Education: Schools, Universities, and Communities All Have a Better Chance of Reaching Their Goals by Pooling Their Resources through Partnerships
With programs in education being placed under increased scrutiny, it is important for faculty at universities and P-12 schools to clearly demonstrate how they are meeting the changing needs of their students, while also serving as good stewards within...