Psychiatry, Psychology and Law

Psychiatry, Psychology and Law is a magazine specializing in Law topics.

Articles from Vol. 10, No. 2, November

Cultural Differences in Adolescents' Perceptions of the Seriousness of Delinquent Behaviours
In the light of the debate in recent times on crime and ethnicity, this paper examines cultural differences in the perception of the seriousness of delinquent behaviours. A total of 907 adolescents attending high schools in metropolitan NSW participated...
Do Simple "Groundrules" Reduce Preschoolers' Suggestibility about Experienced and Nonexperienced Events?
This study examined whether providing preschool children with simple groundrules (the importance of being complete, saying "I don't know", correcting the interviewer, and not guessing) would reduce false details in their recall of a staged event. Forty-nine...
Fear in Fear-of-Crime
In this article, fear-of-crime research is integrated with multidisciplinary knowledge on fear and phobias. At present, many of the practical applications stemming from criminological research have treated fear-of-crime as a crime phobia and have attempted...
Ideological Divarication in Civil Commitment Decision-Making
The author argues that fundamental ideological divergence in civil commitment decision-making can be identified by reference to a series of specific points of reference: cases where patients have recently self-harmed, cases where patients have harmed...
Issues Surrounding the Risk Assessment of Sexual Offenders with an Intellectual Disability
The assessment and treatment of sex offenders with an intellectual disability has received increasing attention over the last 15 to 20 years but there has been little research conducted on the evaluation of assessment and treatment approaches to this...
Liability of Psychiatrists for Failure to Certify
An area which has long been unclear in medical malpractice law has been the extent of the liability of psychiatrists and psychiatric hospitals for releasing a person prematurely with the result that either they or someone else is harmed. In a controversial...
Making Sense of Arson through Classification
Arson classification efforts are an attempt to make sense of a complex whole. To a greater or lesser extent typologies offered to date have relied on assumed motive. More recently, systems that combine information about offender characteristics and/or...
Offending Behaviour and Mental Illness: Characteristics of a Mental Health Court Liaison Service
This paper begins with a brief review of recent literature about relationships between offending behaviour and mental illness, classifying studies by the settings within which they occurred. The establishment and role of a mental health court liaison...
Psychiatry, Stigma and Courts
Stigma causes significant handicap to people with mental illness. The mentally ill in the criminal justice system are an extremely marginalised group. This article examines stigma, mentally ill offenders and the role of court liaison services in managing...
Recidivism among Male Juvenile Sexual Offenders in Western Australia
Juvenile sexual offenders form a substantial part of the sexual offender population and a subset of them will continue offending against the person in general, and sexually in particular, into adulthood. Part of a strategy to reduce offending against...
Risk-Need Assessment Inventories for Juvenile Offenders in Australia
Assessment of the risks and needs of juvenile offenders is widely accepted as fundamentally important in juvenile justice. We describe two inventories that are being used in Australian settings to systematically undertake such assessment: (a) the Secure...
Signed Consent Forms in Criminological Research: Protection for Researchers and Ethics Committees but a Threat to Research Participants?
The use of signed consent forms is mandated by most human research ethics committees and social science ethics codes. In this article we argue that the use of signed consent forms in criminological research provides protection for researchers and ethics...
Strike a Light, This Match Didn't Work! Evaluation of the Victorian Community Based Corrections Treatment and Testing Policy: Does Matching to Treatment Improve Outcomes?
The Victorian Department of Justice, between 1994 and 1996, had a policy of matching offenders sentenced to a community based order, who had problems assessed as arising from drug/alcohol use, to drug and alcohol treatment. In part the policy was grounded...