Childhood Education

Founded in 1924, Childhood Education is an academic journal owned and published by the Association for Childhood Education International, a professional association of educators and parents whose goal is to foster the development of sound educational practices for children from infancy through early adolescence. The journal is published six times per year. Its editorial offices are located in Olney, Md. Childhood Education has 12,000 member and institutional subscribers located in over 53 different countries. Membership consists of classroom teachers, school administrators, educational consultants, teachers-in-training, childcare workers, librarians, parents and caregivers. Articles provide information on topics related to innovative classroom practices, child development, family dynamics, international issues and original research. The journal also conducts product reviews of children's books, videos, software and teaching materials.Originally established in 1892, the Association for Childhood Education International is one of the country's longest-standing professional education associations. In 1946, the Association added the term “International” to its name as a means to demonstrate the organization's concern for and commitment to the education of children in affected war zones. In 1949, the Association became a forerunner of advocacy for civil rights when it denied requests from three states that it maintain separate memberships for blacks and whites. The following year, in 1950, the Association issued its Guide for Groups Wishing to Extend Invitations to ACEI. These guidelines provided stipulations that all Association invitations include the assurance that black members would receive equal access to hotel accommodations, restaurants and public transportation. In 2008, Childhood Education was honored when two of its articles, "The Changing Culture of Childhood: A Perfect Storm" and "Beyond Benchmarks and Scores: Reasserting the Role of Motivation and Interest in Children's Academic Achievement," were finalists for the EdPressDistinguished Achievement Awards. The Editor of Childhood Education is Anne Watson Bauer and Bruce Herzig is Assistant Editor.

Articles from Vol. 75, No. 6, September 1

Children's Creative Thinking in Kenya
Within the traditional Kenyan society, children were perceived as precious beings highly prized by the community at large. As such, a child's early education was everyone's concern. The nurturing of children's creative thinking, however, was a responsibility...
Creative Children in Romanian Society
Every Romanian child has the right to education, regardless of social background, gender, or political or religious affiliation. Compulsory general education lasts for eight years. The Romanian education system has the following structure: preschool...
Encouraging Young Children's Critical and Creative Thinking Skills: An Approach in One English Elementary School
Can young children be taught to think creatively and critically? This question is the focus of an innovative approach to teaching and learning that has been implemented by one elementary school in the southwest of England. Known as Talents Unlimited,...
Is Creativity Nurtured in Finnish Classrooms?
To what degree do cultures value and nurture creativity? Are some cultures more creative than others? Or, do they simply express their creativity in different ways? Do classroom experiences, specifically those for young children, affect their later...
The Improvement of Children's Creativity through Korean Picture Books
Creativity and problem-solving skills appear to be more in demand than ever before. This article presents the authors' observations of a Korean kindergarten that aimed to facilitate the children's creativity. One definition of creativity, that of...
Thinking for the Future: Developing Higher-Level Thinking and Creativity for Students in Japan - and Elsewhere
The fundamental goal for educators today is to prepare children to be self-sufficient and successful. To achieve this goal, students must receive training in higher-level thinking, personal motivation, inquiry, and creativity. Children should be encouraged...
Turning Points in Mexico
"Open your books to page 31," the teacher requests. The 3rd-graders obediently take out their readers and prepare to read a story, the same way they did yesterday and the day before. One of the children sitting in the front row begins reading the first...
Using Polynesian Legends and Folktales to Encourage Culture Vision and Creativity
"What is that shadow on the moon?" Despite diversity in nationality, lifestyle, religion, or ethnicity, children all over world look into the night sky to ponder a similar question. "Craters," says a European-American child, who recently had visited...