Clinical Psychiatry News

Clinical Psychiatry News is a monthly medical and psychiatry tabloid published since 1973 by the International Medical News Group. Subjects for Clinical Psychiatry News include psychology and psychiatry. The executive editor is Denise Fulton, and Gina Henderson is a senior editor.

Articles from Vol. 36, No. 6, June

Allergies May Be Associated with Depression, Suicide
PHILADELPHIA -- Seasonal allergies might be associated with fatigue and mood disorders, including depression, in certain patients, Dr. Tedor T. Postolache reported at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. ...
Ask 10 Questions before Prescribing Stimulants for ADHD
New York -- Before starting a child on stimulants to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, consider asking some extra questions to confirm the diagnosis and family history, Dr. Laurence L. Greenhill said at a psychopharmacology update sponsored...
Ask Patients about Use of the Internet
WASHINGTON -- Psychiatrists might be surprised by just how easy it is for their patients to access very detailed information about suicide methods on the Internet, a study using five Internet search engines shows. "The bottom line for us [as psychiatrists]...
Assess and Treat Apnea in Diabetes Patients
ST. LOUIS -- Sleep apnea assessment and treatment should be considered an integral part of diabetes management, Susan M. LaRue, R.D., said at the annual meeting of the American Association of Diabetes Educators. "Sleep apnea is highly prevalent...
Asthma Outreach Program Poised to Expand; New York City-Based Initiative Estimates Cost per Underserved Pediatric Patient Is Down by $4,490
MIAMI BEACH -- Physicians who run a successful outreach and treatment program for underserved, inner-city children and adults with asthma plan to expand nationwide once they determine the essential and cost-effective components. The overall prevalence...
A Texas Appeals Court Ruled Recently That the State Illegally Seized Hundreds of Children from a Polygamists' Compound. A Few Days Later, the State's Supreme Court Upheld That Ruling. as Facts about the Sect Unfold, Does It Appear That Taking the Children Was in the Children's Best Interests?
The complexity of this case makes it difficult to determine what is in the best interests of the children. As of this writing, it is unclear where the children might end up. However, our job as clinicians who make decisions based on facts and evidence...
Avoid Potential Mistakes in Managing ADHD: Watch out for Comorbidities Such as Learning Disabilities, ODD, Conduct Disorder, Depression
MIAMI BEACH -- TO avoid mistakes in the management of a child with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, consider the patient's receptive language age, comorbidities such as depression, and medication to protect a young child when a parent is very...
CBT Approaches Valuable for Developmentally Disabled
SAN DIEGO -- Cognitive-behavioral treatment can help developmentally disabled persons with sexual behavior problems learn self-regulation skills, but don't expect one approach to work in all cases. "Treatment has to be very concrete and directive,...
Charter Sets Rules for Physician Ratings
Under an agreement among physicians, consumers, employers, and large insurers, some health plans have agreed to have their physician rating systems audited by independent experts. The announcement comes after physicians across the country questioned...
Complex Factors Drive Underage Alcohol Use
A complex mixture of biologic, psychological, and social evidence suggests that alcohol consumption in children and adolescents is a developmental issue, based on data from several studies published in a supplement in the journal Pediatrics. The...
Depression Tied to High Vitamin D, Low Parathyroid Hormone Levels
Both the presence and severity of depression are associated with decreased serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and increased levels of parathyroid hormone in older patients, researchers reported. It is not yet known whether abnormal levels of 25(OH)D...
Dexmedetomidine Reduces Postsurgery Delirium
BALTIMORE -- The use of dexmedetomidine for sedation after cardiac surgery significantly reduces the incidence of inhospital delirium, compared with midazolam and propofol, two commonly used postoperative sedation drugs. In an open-label randomized...
Dyslipidemia Improves after Teen Bariatric Surgery
COLORADO SPRINGS -- Dyslipidemia improves markedly after bariatric surgery in extremely obese adolescents, Dr. Holly M. Ippisch reported at a conference of the American Heart Association. The improvement in lipid abnormalities is apparent within the...
Dyslipidemia Poses Threat in Bipolar Disorder
WASHINGTON -- Many patients with bipolar disorder appear to have dangerous levels of dyslipidemia, based on a retrospective study of more than 200 patients. Researchers found that almost two-thirds of patients with bipolar disorder (61%) met criteria...
Dysregulated Eating May Be Linked to Cortisol
BALTIMORE -- Children with greater food intake in the absence of hunger might have abnormal cortisol levels after stressful situations--a finding that could have implications for the development of obesity--data presented at the annual meeting of the...
Early Adversity Linked to Risk of Adult Obesity
Some stressful childhood emotional experiences are associated with an increased likelihood of adult obesity and, therefore, a greater risk for type 2 diabetes, according to findings of a British population-based study of more than 9,000 participants....
Early Family-Based Intervention Might Help Prevent Antisocial Behavior
KAUI, HAWAN -- Preschoolers at genetic risk for antisocial behavior may benefit from family-based preventive intervention, Dr. Glen O. Gabbard said at the annual meeting of the American College of Psychiatrists. "I worked in the prison system for...
Hypnotics and Sleep Apnea
The Problem You have a patient with obstructive sleep apnea who requests a hypnotic. Knowing that benzodiazepines can worsen the condition, you consider prescribing one of the common hypnotics. The Question Which of the commonly prescribed...
Inflammation May Connect Obesity with Heart Failure
The inflammatory markers interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein as well as macroalbuminuria are independently predictive of heart failure, according to a study that followed nearly 7,000 Americans for a median of 4 years. Each standard deviation increase...
Intellectual Impairment: Use Developmental Lens
BOSTON -- Failure to use a developmental framework when assessing mental illness in children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities can hinder the accurate diagnosis of psychiatric disorders, and lead to inappropriate and possibly dangerous...
Is There a (Real) Doctor on the Plane?
Sometimes topics for this column seem to fall out of the sky. The idea for this month's literally did occur in the sky. I was in the middle of some time zone returning on an American Airlines flight from that sublime trip to India that I mentioned...
Look for Comorbidities with Problem Gambling
WASHINGTON -- Pathological gambling is significantly associated with substance abuse, posttraumatic stress disorder, adjustment disorders, and dependent and narcissistic personality disorders, according to the results of a study of 772 inpatient and...
Low Vitamin D Tied to High Risk in Breast Ca
Vitamin D deficiency at the time of breast cancer diagnosis is common and is associated with a significantly increased risk of metastasis and mortality, according to data from a study to be presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of...
Mammography Plus Ultrasound Detects More Cancers
Adding a single screening ultrasound exam to routine mammography significantly improves breast cancer detection in women who are at high risk for the disease, investigators reported. Supplementing mammography with ultrasound raised the rate of diagnosis...
Massachusetts Plan Is Doing Well
WASHINGTON -- Don't believe what you read in the national media: The Massachusetts health coverage plan enacted in 2006 is actually doing quite well, thank you very much. That was the message from John McDonough, D.P.H., executive director of Health...
McCain Plan Relies on Tax Changes, Cost Control
While the Democrats continue to debate the need for individual mandates for health coverage, Sen. John McCain recently unveiled a starkly different plan for reforming the health care system. At the heart of Sen. McCain's health proposal is a plan...
Medical Home Concept Now Closer to Reality
WASHINGTON -- The concept of a medical home is one step closer to reality for Medicare patients, after it received strong backing from the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission. All 17 commissioners present at the meeting in April voted to urge Congress...
Medicare Panel Alarmed by Sharply Rising Hospice Costs
WASHINGTON -- Staggering growth in the popularity of hospice services--and in the rise of for-profit hospice providers--has caught the attention of the Medicare Payment Assessment Commission. At their recent meeting, MedPAC commissioners debated...
Methadone Is Complex Choice for Managing Pain
TAMPA -- Methadone is an excellent choice for pain management when the prescribing complexities are understood, said two experts at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine and the Hospice and Palliative Nurses...
Migraine Frequency, Aura Tied to CV Disease Risk
CHICAGO -- Migraine frequency appears to be an indicator of increased risk of cardiovascular disease in migraineurs with aura, according to findings from a large cohort analysis presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology....
Modafinil May Keep Weight Gain from Olanzapine to Minimum
WASHINGTON -- The wakefulness drug modafinil appears to reduce weight gain associated with the use of the atypical antipsychotic olanzapine, based on a study of healthy subjects presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association....
Nerve Block Reduces Hot Flushes, Sleep Disturbances
A stellate-ganglion nerve block significantly reduced the frequency and intensity of hot flushes and sleep disruption in breast-cancer survivors, according to a study. This finding may lead to a new therapy that could boost medication compliance...
New Atypical Shows Efficacy for Inpatients in Early Trial
WASHINGTON -- The novel atypical antipsychotic iloperidone is just as effective as ziprasidone for the short-term treatment of acute exacerbation of schizophrenia, a 4-week, double-blind study of 593 psychiatric inpatients shows. In addition, iloperidone's...
Obesity/CVD Risk Spans Ethnicities
Obesity is epidemic in most but not all racial and ethnic groups, and the incidence of cardiovascular disease risk factors and subclinical vascular disease is directly related to obesity, regardless of race or ethnicity, according to recent findings...
Obesity, Sleep Duration Associated across Groups
Obesity was associated with poor sleep across a range of populations, and people who didn't get enough sleep were more likely to develop metabolic syndrome, based on data from a pair of studies. Previous research has shown an association between...
Older Ca Patients Have Greater Risk of Suicide
BOSTON -- The risk of suicide in older adults is higher among patients with cancer than among those with other medical illnesses, even after controlling for psychiatric illness and the risk of dying within 1 year, Dr. Matthew Miller reported at the...
Options Limited in Resistant Schizophrenia: Trial of Clozapine Is Considered Standard Approach, but Optimal Results Could Take More Than 6 Weeks
Progress in the treatment of schizophrenia over the last decades has been dramatic, with the development of new antipsychotics and accelerating research into the disorder's diverse symptom domains. But a substantial proportion of patients--20%-30%...
Partner History Raises Gay Women's Vaginosis Risk
CHICAGO -- The biggest risk factor for bacterial vaginosis among gay or bisexual women is having a sex partner with a history of the disorder--an association that increases the chances of bacterial vaginosis by more than 400%, Dr. Jeanne Marrazzo said...
Payments from Employers Promote Smoking Cessation
PITTSBURCH -- Financial incentives for smoking cessation offered by employees in large workplace settings succeed in getting employees to quit, the findings from a government-funded study suggest. The subject is controversial. Two 2005 Cochrane...
Personality Disorder Subtype Predicts Relapse
TORONTO -- The impact of stressful life events on alcohol relapse varied depending on personality disorder subtype and history of alcohol use in an analysis of data from the Collaborative Longitudinal Study of Personality Disorders, Dr. Christina M....
Peruse E-Mails, Records of Online Sex Offenders
SAN FRANCISCO -- When assessing defendants charged with online sex offenses, a forensic psychiatrist cannot rely entirely on a face-to-face interview, Dr. Clarence Watson said at the annual meeting of the American College of Forensic Psychiatry. ...
Psychiatry and Chronic Pain Patterns
As a psychiatrist known for using behavioral techniques as well as a variety of relaxation therapies, I was not surprised when, a number of years ago, orthopedic surgeons and neurosurgeons started referring their chronic pain patients to me. These...
Psychosocial Competence May Affect Diabetes Control
WASHINGTON -- Total social competence and externalizing behavior may play a role in how well children and adolescents control their diabetes, according the results of a study involving 78 patients. "Lower total psychosocial competence is a strong...
PTSD Increases Hospitalizations in Primary Care
Posttraumatic stress disorder is associated with a doubling of the number of hospitalizations and more than twice the use of mental health resources for urban primary care patients, according to a cross-sectional study published in the journal Medical...
Questionnaire Tops Other Mood Evaluations
WASHINGTON -- A nine-item questionnaire of self-reported symptoms was more reliable and efficient than the widely used Geriatric Depression Scale and the Minimum Data Set 2.0 scale at assessing mood disorders in nursing home patients, according to...
Reducing Salt Intake Could Help Combat Childhood Obesity
Dietary salt intake significantly drives consumption of sugar-sweetened soft drinks in children and adolescents, an analysis of British survey data has shown. This is the first time such a link has been described in young people, Dr. Feng J. He...
Results Support Early Screening of All Trauma Patients; PTSD Is Prevalent 1 Year after Injury
NEW YORK--Posttraumatic stress disorder and depression are extremely common a full year after hospitalization for injury and are associated with up to a nearly sixfold increased likelihood of failure to return to work, according to the largest-ever...
Screening for Metabolic Syndrome Encouraged
WASHINGTON -- Risk factors for metabolic syndrome appear to be common among patients on antipsychotics, making the screening for metabolic abnormalities a potentially important component of care for this population, a study of 92 patients shows. ...
Should Primary Care Physicians Provide Dementia Screening? the Evidence for Screening Is Weak
At first glance, dementia screening appears likely to be beneficial. But advocates of population-based dementia screening fail to take into account medicine's prime directive: First, do no harm. Screening would indeed identify more Alzheimer's patients...
Should Primary Care Physicians Provide Dementia Screening? Too Many Patients Go Undiagnosed
Alzheimer's disease affects more than 5 million Americans and is the fourth-leading cause of death in the United States. Yet by many accounts, only 50% of the cases are diagnosed, and only 25% of patients receive the medication they need. In 40 years,...
Slashing Research Money Won't Help, May Hurt
Times are tough ... belts must be tightened ... everyone should sacrifice. These are the messages Congress conveys as it debates the next year's federal budget. But indiscriminate across the board cuts harm areas that promote the general welfare and...
Smoothing the Road for Teens with Mental Illness
For most teenagers, 18 is a magic number. High school graduation, admission into college, entrance into the "working world," and independent living are among the milestone transitions that happen at or around 18 years. But for teenagers with serious...
Sodium, Potassium Ratio Affects Cardiac Risk
COLORADO SPRINGS -- The intake ratio of sodium to potassium bears a much stronger association with subsequent development of cardiovascular disease than does consumption of either alone, according to new findings from the Trials of Hypertension Followup...
Stress in Early Pregnancy May Raise Schizophrenia Risk
Severe stress in the first trimester was linked in a population-based study to an increased risk of a woman's offspring developing schizophrenia as an adolescent or adult. "This effect is independent of a range of factors known to influence risk...
Teens with Type 2 Diabetes Often Misjudge Their Weight
More than half of adolescents with type 2 diabetes underestimate their weight, and so do their parents, according to results from interviews with 104 child-parent pairs. "Clinicians should recognize that even extremely overweight children and their...
Ten Minutes a Day Walking on Treadmill Eases Mood, Pain
ORLANDO -- A physical conditioning program that consisted of just 10 minutes a day of walking on a treadmill at a moderate pace for 3 weeks significantly improved measures of pain perception, aerobic capacity, depression, and anxiety, in chronic pain...
Three-Drug Combo Aids Quit Rates in Ill Smokers: Patients Used Patch, Inhaler, and Bupropion until They Were Able to Go 14 Days without Cravings
PITTSBURGH -- Among medically ill smokers, a combination of the nicotine patch, a nicotine inhaler, and bupropion significantly increased smoking cessation rates at 26 weeks compared with the nicotine patch alone and did not result in serious adverse...
Too Much, Too Little Sleep Doubles Risk of Death
COLORADO SPRINGS -- Change in sleep duration during midlife is associated in a U-shaped fashion with risk for death more than a decade later, Dr. Francesco Cappuccio reported at a conference of the American Heart Association. The major driver of...
'Use It or Lose It' Strategy Can Prevent Cognitive Decline
CHICAGO -- Older adults with normal cognition who engaged in a mental fitness program for 1 hour a day, 5 days a week for 8 weeks demonstrated significant improvements in memory and nonmemory tasks, according to data presented at the annual meeting...
Use of Triglyceride Oil Promotes Weight Loss
Colorado Springs -- Substituting moderate amounts of medium-chain triglycerides for other fats in a weight-loss program results in enhanced weight loss and a greater reduction in fat mass with no adverse impact on cardiovascular risk factors, according...
Variations in Gene May Predict Risk of PTSD
Among people who experienced severe trauma as children, variations in the FKBP5 gene appear to predict who will develop posttraumatic stress disorder when exposed to further trauma as adults, investigators reported. Some polymorphisms in the FKBP5...
Working Memory Low in Children with ADHD
PHILADELPHIA -- Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder performed worse than children without the disorder on tests of working memory--an important factor in learning and academic success, according to the results of a case-controlled...
Working with Psychotherapists Now Important in Physician
SAN FRANCISCO -- In psychiatry, the thinking has changed on working with psychotherapists who lack medical degrees, according to Dr. John Q. Young. Dr. Young, a psychiatrist with the University of California, San Francisco, said knowing how to collaborate...
Workplace Program Lowers Headache Frequency, Analgesic Use
A workplace exercise and relaxation program can significantly reduce the frequency of headaches and shoulder pain as well as employees' use of analgesics, according to an Italian study of 384 workers. Researchers from the University of Turin (Italy)...
Youths Overestimate Asthma Control
HONOLULU -- Nearly three-quarters of adolescents with asthma overestimate their level of asthma control, according to a study of more than 200 teens. Their degree of overestimation is often large as well, said Dr. Maria Britto of Cincinnati Children's...
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