Clinical Psychiatry News

Clinical Psychiatry News is a monthly medical and psychiatry tabloid published since 1973 by the International Medical News Group. Subjects for Clinical Psychiatry News include psychology and psychiatry. The executive editor is Denise Fulton, and Gina Henderson is a senior editor.

Articles from Vol. 35, No. 6, June

A Call for Buprenorphine Certification
Young people living in middle class and affluent suburbs are dying in unprecedented numbers because of their addictions to opiates. Most of these deaths are the result of addiction to diverted prescription analgesics, used alone or with alcohol and...
Adding Alcohol Intervention Can Help Smoking Cessation
AUSTIN, TEX. -- Adding a brief alcohol intervention to treatment for smoking cessation can improve patients' odds of quitting smoking, Christopher Kahler, Ph.D., reported at the annual meeting of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. ...
A New Study Says That Patients Experiencing Losses Often Are Diagnosed with Depression When Their Reactions Are Normal. Are Psychiatrists Too Quick to Label Patients as Depressed?
The term "depression" has evolved into one that is highly misunderstood, because it is used by laymen to include moments of sadness and feeling blue, and numerous other symptoms related to conditions such as ennui or alexithymia. On the other hand,...
Antidepressants May Improve Multiple Outcomes after Stroke
WASHINGTON -- Prompt, short-term treatment with antidepressants is associated with significantly improved physical, cognitive, and survival outcomes in stroke patients--regardless of whether they have symptoms of depression, Dr. Robert Robinson said...
A Psychiatrist's Eulogy for Thomas Eagleton
Senator, citizen, patient, and would-be vice president of the United States, you died on March 4, 2007. The ubiquitous obituaries in the local and national papers highlighted a special time in your life--and in the history of psychiatry. The year...
Before Drugs, Think 'S.E.L.F.' for Hypersomnia
RANCHO MIRAGE, CALIF -- Behavioral treatments should be the first line of defense when treating children with hypersomnia, Dr. Raphael Pelayo said at a meeting on sleep disorders in infants and childhood. Dr. Pelayo developed the mnemonic S.E.L.F....
Brief Counseling Brings Equal Cessation Results
NEW ORLEANS -- Behavioral interventions aimed at smoking cessation showed modest, albeit statistically significant efficacy in a new meta-analysis of 51 randomized controlled trials totaling nearly 27,000 smokers, Salvatore Mottillo reported at the...
Brief Intervention Works despite Comorbidities: Depression, Impulsivity Do Not Impede Change for Trauma Patients with Mild, Moderate Alcohol Problems
FORT MYERS, FLA. -- Depression and/or impulsivity do not get in the way of behavioral change for trauma patients who have participated in a brief motivational intervention for alcohol abuse, results of a study presented at the annual meeting of the...
Bullying and School Violence
News that the college student behind the Virginia tech massacre had been the victim of bullying during middle school and high school was not surprising. In fact, given the available data on common characteristics of perpetrators of school violence,...
Children as Inpatients: Why the Increase?
In a recent, soon-to-be published analysis of National Hospital Discharge Survey data, Joseph C. Blader, Ph.D., and his colleague, Dr. Gabrielle A. Carlson, found that the rate of psychiatric hospitalization of children increased 53% and the rate for...
Company Defends Heart Safety of Rosiglitazone
Despite a recent meta-analysis suggesting an increased cardiovascular risk associated with rosiglitazone, and confirmation of similar preliminary findings from an independent Food and Drug Administration study, GlaxoSmithKline, the drug's manufacturer,...
Controversial Theory Links Autism with Violent Behavior
SANTA FE, N.M. -- Seung Hui Cho may be the latest actor in a subset of people with autism who are prone to violent crime, Dr. J. Arturo Silva said at the annual meeting of the American College of Forensic Psychiatry. Parents and mental health experts...
Data Help Prioritize Drugs for Treating Epilepsy
The results of two large British trials that followed epilepsy patients for several years indicate that lamotrigine should be the drug of first choice for people with partial epilepsy and that valproate should be the drug of first choice for people...
Debate Reopens on Lithium, Bipolar Mothers
TUCSON, ARIZ. -- A new study of 10 mother-infant pairs has raised the question again of whether lithium is a safe therapy when bipolar women breast-feed, Dr. Marlene P. Freeman said at a psychopharmacology conference sponsored by the University of...
Doctors Want Registry Data in PQRI
BALTIMORE -- Outcomes registries, not claims data, should be the base for the Physician Quality Reporting Initiative next year, physicians and their representatives said at a forum held in May by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. CMS...
Don't Let Fear of Opioid Abuse Inhibit Therapies
BETHESDA, MD. -- Physicians can help minimize the potential for abuse of opioid pain medications by considering the agents' delivery route, bioavailability, and pharmacokinetics, said Dr. Pamela P. Palmer, director of PainCARE (Center for Advanced...
Environmental Factors Key in Anxiety Disorders
ST. LOUIS -- Anxiety disorders may be transmitted from one generation to the next by specific family environmental factors such as parental modeling, overcontrolling parental behavior, and family conflict, according to a study presented at the annual...
Eradication of H. Pylori Modifies Idiopathic Parkinsonism Syndrome
SALZBURG, AUSTRIA -- Eradication of Helicobacter pylori in patients with idiopathic parkinsonism modified the syndrome but did not arrest it, according to interim results from a randomized controlled trial presented at an international conference on...
Father's Depression, Anxiety Affect Children
CHICAGO -- Symptoms of depression and anxiety in fathers contribute to psychopathology and impair function in their college-aged children, Kimberly Renk, Ph.D., said in a poster presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Behavioral and...
For Girls on Risperidone, Don't Measure Prolactin
NEW YORK -- A 6-year-old girl with autism is treated with risperidone 0.5 mg twice daily, and after 2 months of treatment her behavior is improved, and there are no noted side effects. But her serum prolactin is clearly elevated for her age at 45 ng/mL....
High Combat Status Puts Greater Stress on Troops: Report Also Examines Attitudes toward Noncombatants, Insurgents
Soldiers and Marines in Iraq are at a greater risk for mental health problems if they spend most of their time outside of their base camp and have multiple or lengthy deployments, according to the latest report commissioned by the U.S. Army Surgeon...
Hippocampal Neurogenesis: Key to Antidepressants?
NEW YORK -- The discovery of a protein called "double cortin," which is produced by differentiating neurons, is giving researchers a beacon in the darkness of neurodevelopment-allowing them to track the process of neurogenesis or formation of new neurons....
Infections, Drug Changes Can Bring Parkinson's to the ED
BOSTON -- Medication changes--either by the physician or the patient--and infections are the most likely culprits behind motor fluctuations that land a patient with Parkinson's disease in the emergency department. "These people come to the ED when...
Isometric Exercise May Benefit Patients with Chronic Pain
WASHINGTON -- Low-intensity isometric exercise appears to significantly ease the perception of pain in healthy young adults, suggesting that such maneuvers could be a pain management tool for older adults with chronic pain conditions but limited mobility,...
Is Psychiatry Evidence-Based Medicine?
We must rely on the best evidence we have. The practice of evidence-based medicine is the integration of individual clinical expertise with the best available external clinical evidence from systematic research, and further integrating this with...
Joe Greco's Story
"Canvas," a new narrative film by Joseph Greco, explores the impact of schizophrenia on the family. This production, which marks Greco's debut as a feature film writer-director, rings true because it is grounded in autobiographical fact. Greco's mother...
Kids' Coping Ability Minimizes Peer Victimization
BOSTON -- Adolescents' beliefs in their own coping abilities can help mediate the psychosocial impact of relational victimization in school, results of a study have shown. Students who can disengage themselves from the role of victim, who avoid...
Lable Machine Subs for Electronic Medical Records System
If you're not ready to invest thousands of dollars in an electronic medical records system, a desktop label writer may be just what the doctor ordered. "This is a very cost-effective alternative for anyone who doesn't have an EMR system," said Dr....
LDL Drug Reduces Blood Glucose in Diabetes
SEATTLE -- The LDL cholestorol-lowering agent colesevelam also lowers blood glucose levels significantly in type 2 diabetes patients already on oral diabetes medication, according to two studies presented at the annual meeting of the American Association...
Many Factors Influence PTSD Development
SANTIAGO, CHILE -- Various kinds of risk factors for posttraumatic stress disorder and numerous countervailing factors might singularly or collectively promote vulnerability or protection in people who experience traumatic events, Rachel Yehuda, Ph.D.,...
Maternal BPD Predicts Poor Social Functioning in Offspring
CHICAGO -- A large study indicates that mothers with symptoms of borderline personality disorder may be more likely to have adolescent offspring with problems forming relationships, Nathaniel H. Herr and his colleagues reported in a poster presentation...
Measured Interpretation of CATIE Encouraged
TUCSON, ARIZ. -- Dr. Alan J. Gelenberg is not persuaded that the trade-off inherent in a return to first-generation antipsychotics would be worth it. Recent reports show that first-generation antipsychotics are less expensive than the newer drugs....
Medicare Part D Hassles Continue in Second Year
SAN DIEGO -- In the second year of Medicare Part D implementation, physicians continue to struggle with prior authorization requests and other hassles, Dr. Kay M. Mitchell said at the annual meeting of the American College of Physicians. Although...
Mental Health Staff Can't Sue If Injured by Patient
SANTA FE, N.M. -- Patients who attack mental health professionals in hospital settings are rarely prosecuted and usually cannot be sued for civil damages, Ralph J. Slovenko, Ph.D., advised at the annual meeting of the American College of Forensic Psychiatry....
Motion Sickness Drug Lifts Unipolar, Bipolar Depression: Scopolamine Effective in Small Study
SANTIAGO, CHILE -- Treatment with scopolamine hydrobromide blocks muscarinic cholinergic receptors and produces a rapid, robust antidepressant response in depressed patients with unipolar or bipolar depression, Maura L. Furey, Ph.D., reported at an...
Multiple Types of Abuse Lead to PTSD, Other Comorbidities
HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. -- The more complex a child's victimization history, the more likely he or she is to experience multiple negative outcomes, including posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and substance use, Benjamin E. Saunders, Ph.D., reported...
Neurocognitive Effects of Sleep Apnea
The Problem You have a patient with an obvious high body mass index. His spouse tells you that he snores and experiences brief episodes of apnea. Polysomnographic recordings confirm a diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). You try to educate...
Pay-for-Performance Ethical Concerns Explored
SAN DIEGO -- Pay-for-performance programs must be carefully designed to avoid putting some of the most vulnerable patient populations at risk, officials with the American College of Physicians warned at the organization's annual meeting. Although...
Pediatric Skin Diseases Have High Quality of Life Impact
MAUI, HAWAII -- The major chronic skin diseases of childhood impair quality of life to at least as great a degree as diabetes, renal disease, asthma, and other chronic nondermatologic diseases, Dr. Sarah L. Chamlin said at the annual Hawaii Dermatology...
Perspective
It takes more than education to change behavior. Yet, when the public became aware of the consequences of severe bullying--bullying rooted in hatred or hostility and akin to a form of torture--everyone ran to the cottage-industry approach of education-only...
Positive Parenting Helps Keep Early-Maturing Girls on Track
BOSTON -- Positive parenting practices can minimize the impact that negative peer influence has on early-maturing girls and thus can reduce the risk of externalizing problems, results of a study have shown. For this reason, psychosocial interventions...
Program Addresses Domestic Violence in Military Families
CAMP PENDLETON, CALIF. -- A family-focused intervention has helped to curb domestic violence among Marine Corps families in Southern California, a judge said at an international conference on civilian and military combat stress. Judge Pamela Iles...
Psychiatric Disorders Common with Headache
MIAMI BEACH -- Comorbid psychiatric conditions are common in patients with headache disorders, and can adversely affect the prognosis in patients with such disorders, Alvin E. Lake III, Ph.D., said at a symposium sponsored by the American Headache...
Rating Scales Are Just One Evaluation Tool
SANTIAGO, CHILE -- Mental health rating scales cannot replace clinical judgment, but they can be useful tools for clinicians, Dr. Martha Sajatovic said at an international congress sponsored by the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry....
Reporting Program May Require Modifiers
Physicians who choose to participate in Medicare's pay for reporting program do not have to satisfy quality indicators to receive a bonus. But in some cases, they will need to cite why they did not follow evidence-based guidelines. Under the Physician...
Risk-Based Cancer Care Has Long-Term Benefits
MIAMI -- Children with cancer should be treated according to "risk-based care" to prevent or minimize adverse effects that often emerge 5 or more years after initial therapy, Dr. Melissa M. Hudson said at a pediatric update sponsored by Miami Children's...
Risk of PTSD Is Higher in Those with History of Family Problems
SAN DIEGO -- A high proportion of America's youth experience or witness a violent event, and a family history of substance abuse or mental health problems increase the risk that these youth will develop posttraumatic stress disorder or depression....
Risk Score That Predicts Future Dementia Diagnosis Is Validated
SALZBURG, AUSTRIA -- A risk score that predicts the likelihood of a middle-aged person developing dementia within 20 years has been independently validated in an ethnically diverse population, according to data presented at an international conference...
Selective Vitamin Supplementation May Improve Cognitive Functions
WASHINGTON -- Supplementation with vitamins [B.sub.6] and [B.sub.12] and folate in younger to middle-aged adults improves motor speed and sequencing ability on neuropsychological tests, according to the results of a randomized, double-blind trial....
Sleep Can Protect Memories from Associative Interference
BOSTON -- Sleep strengthens declarative memory, a finding that could one day be exploited to combat cognitive declines associated with dementia and neurologic disorders, Dr. Jeffrey M. Ellenbogen reported at the annual meeting of the American Academy...
Staff Key to Heading off Psychiatric Emergencies
NEW ORLEANS -- Educating staff to spot triggers for disruptive behavior in long-term care facility residents and to effectively prevent escalation is key to helping head off psychiatric emergencies, Dr. Amita Patel said at the annual meeting of the...
Starting, Ending Antidepressants: Educating Patients about What to Expect in the Course of Antidepressant Therapy Is Critical
Difficulties can develop at any time in the course of antidepressant therapy, but they seem to cluster at the beginning and the end. Although it usually takes weeks for a therapeutic response, many adverse reactions--nausea, headache, somnolence,...
Stroke and Alzheimer's Pathology Raise Risk of Dementia
BALTIMORE -- The interaction of cerebrovascular disease and Alzheimer's disease pathology appears to significantly increase the risk of dementia, Dr. Richard O'Brien said at a meeting on Alzheimer's disease and related disorders sponsored by Johns...
Survey: Most Physicians Have Drug Industry Ties
Nearly all physicians have ties to the pharmaceutical or device industries ranging from accepting drug samples to serving on a speakers' bureau, according to a survey of physicians across six specialties. The study found that 94% of physicians surveyed...
The Art of Mark Boritz
Artist Mark Boritz holds a bachelor's degree in photography from Empire State College in New York, but he still considers himself self-taught. Mr. Boritz, a lifelong resident of Brooklyn who loves New York City's architecture and skyline, used to...
Thimerosal Exposure during Pregnancy Not Linked to Autism
Exposure to thimerosal-containing Rh immunoglobulin during pregnancy is not associated with an increased risk of having a child with an autism spectrum disorder, said Dr. Judith H. Miles and T. Nicole Takahashi. Overall, 214 mothers of 230 children...
Treating Avoidant Personality Disorder
One of the most challenging people I've treated was a man in his 40s who had lived a lonely, isolated life as a bookkeeper for a large textile firm. He had his own private office--which allowed him to keep socialization with coworkers to an absolute...
Virginia Tech: Clues but No Conclusions
SANTA FE, N.M. -- Eleven days after Seung Hui Cho killed 32 people and himself at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, 90 forensic psychiatrists found that they did not have enough information to diagnose Mr. Cho or determine what set off his rampage. Those...
Wal-Mart CEO Hard-Selling Health Care Reform
WASHINGTON -- Wal-Mart's CEO Lee Scott isn't waiting around for Washington's power elite to reform health care. He's taking on the job himself, one gigantic retail store at a time. In the past 2 years, Wal-Mart has established on-site medical clinics...
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