Clinical Psychiatry News

Clinical Psychiatry News is a monthly medical and psychiatry tabloid published since 1973 by the International Medical News Group. Subjects for Clinical Psychiatry News include psychology and psychiatry. The executive editor is Denise Fulton, and Gina Henderson is a senior editor.

Articles from Vol. 29, No. 7, July

Address Herbal Use with Patients to Avoid Interactions
Growing evidence shows that herbal remedies aren't what they seem. What experiences have you had with patient drug-herbal interactions that could have been avoided with intervention by the Food and Drug Administration? Do you think the FDA should be...
Altering Sleep and Light Aids Affective Disorders
PHOENIX, ARIZ. -- Manipulations of the sleep-wake cycle may be a promising strategy for a broadening range of affective disorders, Dr. Barbara Parry said at the annual meeting of the New Clinical Drug Evaluation Unit sponsored by the National Institute...
AMA Delegates Cheer Ledge of Regulatory Relief
New HHS reform group will target regulations that unfairly burden doctors. CHICAGO -- A promise from the Bush administration to open up communications with physicians in an effort to reduce regulatory burdens kicked off the 100th anniversary meeting...
Antisuicidal Effect of Self-Injury Calls for Tolerance
ATLANTA -- Because self-injury may have antisuicidal benefits, clinicians should not forbid the behavior until there are solid replacement skills, Barent Walsh, D.S.W, said in a panel discussion at the annual meeting of the American Association of...
Beer, Cigarette Taxes Curb Teen Use
BALTIMORE -- State-mandated beer and cigarette taxes were linked to a significant reduction in smoking and drinking among teens in a survey of adolescents from 20 states, Dr. David M. Bishai reported at the annual meeting of the Pediatric Academic...
Brain Receptors Complicate Nicotine Withdrawal
Los ANGELES -- Smokers who want to quit face several challenges unique to cigarettes, Dr. Lori D. Karan reported at the annual meeting of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. Antismoking medication, prescribed appropriately and administered...
Catatonia Often Is Overlooked, Ineptly Treated
PHOENIX, ARIZ. -- Although many psychiatrists consider catatonia a rare variant of schizophrenia, it actually occurs across diagnostic categories, with an incidence as high as 15%-30%, Dr. Max Fink said at the annual meeting of the New Clinical Drug...
Children Often Are Direct Victims in Families Reported for Violence
SAN DIEGO -- Preliminary results from a study of Navy families reported for family violence suggest that 29%-52% of children in these families are direct victims, Rochelle Hanson, Ph.D., said at a conference sponsored by the Children's Center for Child...
Citalopram-Reboxetine Aids Refractory Depression
PHOENIX, ARIz. -- The combination of citalopram and reboxetine, two antidepressants with different mechanisms of action, appeared effective for depression that had been refractory to treatment with diverse other strategies, according to a poster presentation...
Cognition Improves with Antihypertensive Therapy
SAN FRANCISCO -- Rigorous control of blood pressure in 66 patients with mild to moderate hypertension and cognitive impairment improved cognitive function in a prospective, randomized trial, Dr. Edwm J. Jacobson reported in a poster presentation at...
Dialectical Behavior Therapy Cuts Self-Mutilating Behavior
ATLANTA -- Dialectical behavior therapy reduces self-mutilating behavior by helping patients change dysfunctional attitudes, Katherine Comtois, Ph.D, told the annual meeting of the American Association of Suicidology Patients see emotional dysregulation...
Drugs Plus Therapy Often Indicated in Depression
PRACTICAL PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY: What Experts Do Before Study Results Are In Drugs or psychotherapy? The question of which to use first in the treatment of depression has been around for more than a decade since multicenter studies first found the...
Early Diagnosis Reduces Fetal Alcohol Damage
LOS ANGELES -- For babies affected in utero by maternal drinking, early diagnosis can prevent or minimize secondary disabilities that might otherwise persist for a lifetime, Ann P. Streissguth, Ph.D., said at the annual meeting of the American Society...
Eating Disorders in Men Are Frequently Missed
NEW ORLEANS -- Eating disorders in men are much more prominent than is generally appreciated, Dr. Arnold Andersen said at the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association. Although there are significant barriers to diagnosis and treatment,...
Education, Research Should Move to Ambulatory Setting
DURBAN, SOUTH AFRICA -- A landmark study provides new fuel for those who wish to see the bulk of medical education and research relocated from tertiary academic medical centers to ambulatory settings. "The locus for medical education, research,...
Environmental Issues a Factor in Youth Prescribing
PHILADELPHIA -- Pharmacologic management of children and adolescents requires special attention not only to drug-related issues, but also to environmental issues, Dr. Ginny Gerbino-Rosen said at the annual meeting of the American Society for Adolescent...
FDA Approves First SSRI for Generalized Anxiety
Paroxetine has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for treating generalized anxiety disorder, making this the first selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and the second drug approved specifically for this indication. In two multicenter...
Gingko Biloba's Cognitive Benefit Still Unproved
TUCSON, ARIZ. -- The evidence that Gingko biloba enhances cognition in healthy adults is not strong, consistent, or reliable, Dr. Gary Wenk said at a psycho-pharmacology update sponsored by the University of Arizona. Derived from the ginkgo or kew...
Housing a Clinical Issue in Schizophrenia Care
NEW YORK -- Although decent housing increases the likelihood of successful disease management for patients with schizophrenia, a bad housing environment can exacerbate illness, Kevin Martone said at a schizophrenia conference sponsored by Columbia...
[H.Sub.2]-Blocker Appears to Cut Atypical Weight Gain
No impact on therapeutic response. PHOENIX, ARIZ. -- Using a [histamine.sub.2] blocker may attenuate the weight gain associated with atypical antipsychotics, according to a poster presentation at the annual meeting of the New Clinical Drug Evaluation...
Immigrants May Face an Increased Schizophrenia Risk
WHISTLER, B.C. -- Contemporary studies of immigrant populations continue to elucidate the complex interplay of genes and environment in the development of schizophrenia. Migration has long been thought to contribute to increased risk of mental illness--a...
Improving Support for Patients in End-of-Life Talks
SAN FRANCISCO -- If physicians who must deliver bad news can listen for--and respond to--their patients' expressed and hidden emotions, they can be a strong support for patients in their final days. That was one of the messages delivered by Dr. Walter...
Impulsivity May Be Significant Factor in Childhood Aggression
MIAMI BEACH -- Impulsivity may hold the key to better understanding and development of preventive interventions for childhood aggression, Dr. Jorge Armenteros advised at a psychopharmacology update sponsored by the University of Miami. Impulsive...
Letters
Beds Stable, Support Growing The article "Harvard Cuts 58% of Psychiatric Beds" warrants clarification (April 2001, p. 1). Harvard does not operate psychiatric beds and cannot cut or increase them. In fact, Harvard has no medical beds of any...
Long Work Hours Put Residents on the Picket Line
Medical students are going public with the message that overworked residents are a threat to patient safety. Kevin Baran, a second-year medical student at the University of Connecticut, Farmington, was one of four students who stayed awake for 24...
Maternal Depression TX Not Tied to Neurodevelopmental Problems
A study that followed up children whose mothers took fluoxetine or tricyclics throughout pregnancy found no evidence that the drugs had an adverse impact on their neurodevelopment, said Dr. Gideon Koren, director of the Motherisk Program at the Hospital...
McCarthyism in Medicine
LAWRENCE H. EINHORN When Janet Reno was attorney general, she declared health care fraud to be public enemy number two, right behind murder but ahead of drug abuse. Three hundred new Federal Bureau of Investigation agents were hired to combat and...
Methadone Dose Irrelevant in Third Trimester
Los ANGELES -- Babies born to women who take higher-than-recommended doses of methadone during the third trimester are no more likely to experience withdrawal than are the children of women who take the standard dose, Dr. Peter Selby said at the annual...
MMR Vaccination Not Tied to Rise in Autism Rate
Whatever has caused the increased incidence of autism in recent years, it is not the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, according to findings reported by two groups of investigators. Using the United Kingdom General Practice Research Database, Dr. James...
Most Academic Medical Centers Still Tolerate Smoking
SAN FRANCISCO -- Many academic medical centers maintain hazy policies with regard to smoking, according to a survey released at the 97th International Conference of the American Thoracic Society. Fifty-one academic medical centers across the United...
Nearly One-Third of High School Girls Have Serious Eating Disorders
SAN DIEGO -- Nearly one-third of girls and one-sixth of boys who participated in the first-ever nationwide survey of eating disorders among high school students have significant eating disorder symptoms. Of those, almost none has received treatment,...
New Standards Improve Care at Methadone Clinics
BALTIMORE -- Waiting lists for heroin addicts seeking treatment at methadone clinics are expected to shorten under new regulations issued by the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, a panel of speakers reported at a press conference held by the Substance...
Novel OCs May Ease Menses Symptoms
CHICAGO -- Research on agents to ease menses-triggered psychological and physiologic symptoms received considerable attention at the annual meeting of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. "Premenstrual symptoms occur in up to...
Olanzapine May Have Mild Anticholinergic Profile in Elderly
NEW ORLEANS -- Olanzapine appears to have a relatively safe side effect profile in the elderly, Dr. Bruce J. Kinon reported in two poster presentations at the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association. In an 8-week, open-label study...
Palliative Care for Children Largely Unaddressed
The diagnosis of terminal illness in a pediatric patient rouses potentially disabling emotions, not only in the child and the child's family, but also in the treating physician. Yet, these feelings often go untreated. In the face of a devastating...
PET Scans Map out Novel Antipsychotic Regimen
WHISTLER, B.C. -- As sophisticated neuroimaging techniques continue to unlock the secrets of the schizophrenic brain, new routes to more effective pharmacotherapy are being developed to treat this devastating disorder. Using positron emission tomography...
Physician's Role Is More Than Medical in Palliative Care
SAN FRANCISCO -- In providing palliative care at the end of life, the physician's role extends far beyond relieving pain--it also is to alleviate suffering, Dr. Ira R. Byock said at a videoconference on doctor-patient communication at the end of life...
Pro & Con
Should nicotine replacement therapy be used during pregnancy? YES Women who smoke during pregnancy assume a large risk of serious complications, and it's widely recognized that smoking cessation is one of the most important things a pregnant smoker...
Relapse Rate High despite Long-Term Heroin Abstinence
Patterns of heroin use tend to remain stable among long-term addicts, despite cycles of remission and resumption, said Yih-Ing Hser, Ph.D. of the University of California, Los Angeles, Drug Abuse Research Center and colleagues. Dr. Hser and associates...
Retinal Scans Map Social Phobic Eye Movements
ATLANTA -- Retinal scan readings confirm that social phobics avoid eye contact--a behavior that has been clinically observed but never empirically verified-- Kaye Horley reported at the annual conference of the Anxiety Disorders Association of America....
Soccer Heading Doesn't Impair Cognitive Function
SAN ANTONIO--A full season's worth of soccer heading contacts has no adverse effects on cognitive function in collegiate players, Dr. Margot Putukian reported at a national sports medicine meeting. Some observers of the game have wondered whether...
Specialists More Likely to Spot ADHD Comorbidity
NEW ORLEANS -- Specialty care providers were significantly more likely to diagnose comorbidity in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder than were primary care providers, Dr. Angela LaRosa said at the Southern regional meeting of the...
Spouses with Chronic Disease Put Their Partners at Increased Risk
DURBAN, SOUTH AFRICA -- Patients whose spouse has any of a variety of common chronic diseases are themselves at significantly elevated risk of having the same disease, Dr. Julia Hippisley-Cox reported at WONCA 2001, the conference of the World Organization...
Therapists Have Similar Response to Patient Suicide
NEW ORLEANS -- Seven common responses were observed in a recent study of therapists who had experienced the death of a patient by suicide, Jane G. Tillman, Ph.D., reported at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis. The suicide...
Tricyclic May Raise Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease
DURBAN, SOUTH AFRICA -- Use of the antidepressant dothiepin appears to be a risk factor for subsequent ischemic heart disease, Dr. Julia Hippisley-Cox reported at WONCA 2001, the conference of the World Organization of Family Doctors. Dothiepin...
Two Mood Stabilizers May Be Needed for Bipolar Disorder
TUCSON, ARIZ. -- There is growing support for the notion that two mood stabilizers are more effective than one in the treatment of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents--despite little comprehensive data on the subject, Dr. Patrick M. Burke...
Use Caution in Treating Depressed Cardiac Patients
TUCSON, ARIZ -- Physicians must weigh delicate risks and benefits when treating patients with both serious cardiac disease and psychiatric disorders, paying careful attention to medication interactions and side effects, Dr. John S. Jachna said at a...
Vouchers Replace Rx Samples in Bid to Stop Abuse
WASHINGTON -- In the wake of recent abuses of the "free sample" system in physician's offices, some pharmaceutical companies are opting for vouchers to better track drug samples. Dr. Paul Kalb, an attorney in Washington, D.C., suggested that effective...
Watching Execution Brings No Closure
The notion that witnessing executions brings "closure" to victims' families is false, experts say. The evidence, in fact, shows that doing so can cause witnesses additional stress. When 232 family members assembled on June 11 to watch the closed...
When Bearing Bad News, Be Culturally Sensitive
SAN FRANCISCO -- Cultural differences need to be acknowledged when delivering bad news. Not every patient wishes to be told the truth about a serious diagnosis or a poor prognosis. A great deal of research has been done on differences in cultural...
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