Clinical Psychiatry News

Clinical Psychiatry News is a monthly medical and psychiatry tabloid published since 1973 by the International Medical News Group. Subjects for Clinical Psychiatry News include psychology and psychiatry. The executive editor is Denise Fulton, and Gina Henderson is a senior editor.

Articles from Vol. 35, No. 5, May

Acute Stress Disorder May Predict Ongoing Impairment
SAN DIEGO -- Burn patients who demonstrate symptoms of acute stress disorder during hospitalization are more likely to report chronic pain and impaired psychosocial functioning during the first year of recovery than those who do not, Gina Magyar-Russell,...
ADHD Prodrug May Help High-Risk Patients
Lisdexamfetamine dimesylate is the newest extended-release stimulant for treating attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in young children. It was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity...
AMA Proposes Bundled Pay for Coordinated Care
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. health care delivery system should be overhauled to organize medical practice around "integrated care cycles" that are coordinated by a central physician and to reward physicians for providing value, Michael E. Porter said at...
Anonymity of Internet Emboldens Predators
SAN DIEGO -- The Internet is expanding the number of sexual predators who prey on children, because the anonymity of the computer allows these individuals to start indulging their fantasies actively with impunity, several speakers said at a conference...
Anorexia Raises Risk of Long-Term Bone Damage
TAMPA -- Anorexia nervosa reduces bone mass and puts young women at risk for early onset of osteoporosis, just at the time when they should be building peak bone mass, Dr. Steven Crawford said at the annual meeting of the International Society for...
Antidepressants' Benefits Outweigh Risks for Children: Meta-Analysis Results Seen as Reassuring
The latest study looking at the impact of antidepressant treatments on children and adolescents should be reassuring to physicians and parents because it is another indication that prescribing the medications outweighs the risks of not doing so, top...
Antidepressants May Benefit Prepsychotic Teens
Treatment with antidepressants kept adolescent patients in the prepsychotic phase of schizophrenia from progressing to full psychosis or bipolar disorder more effectively than did treatment with antipsychotics, said Barbara A. Cornblatt, Ph.D., of...
Are Opioids an Appropriate Treatment for Chronic Nonmalignant Pain?
Manage opioids closely and be realistic. Despite almost universal acceptance in acute and cancer pain treatment, opioids have been avoided for treating chronic nonmalignant pain. However, that tide began to turn in the 1990s, and with good reason....
As America Ages, AAGP Issues Alert
NEW ORLEANS -- The aging of America will increase the demand for geriatric psychiatrists, yet the profession is struggling to recruit new physicians and practices are barely staying afloat in the face of declining fees, Dr. Gary Moak said at the annual...
Assume Resilience, Not Pathology, after Disaster
RANCHO MIRAGE, CALIF. -- The first principle of psychiatric assistance for survivors of a disaster--and the principle most often overlooked--is that most people do not become psychiatrically ill afterward, Dr. Carol S. North said. She and her research...
Bullying in Psychiatry Must Stop
We talk a lot in psychiatry about the importance of bringing a halt to bullying in the context of patient care. However, I would like to address the problem of bullying as it hits much closer to home--among ourselves, within our own specialty. It...
Cardiovascular Disease Is Top Cause of Death in Schizophrenia
MADRID -- The largest single cause of death among patients with schizophrenia is cardiovascular disease, Dr. Stefan Leucht reported at the 15th European Congress of Psychiatry. Cardiovascular disease has this impact on schizophrenia patients not...
Ceasing HAART Found Not to Cause Neurocognitive Decline in Healthy Patients
LOS ANGELES -- Relatively healthy individuals who opted to discontinue highly active antiretroviral therapy did not appear to suffer any neurocognitive repercussions and in fact performed better on a standard battery of neuropsychological tests during...
CMS Poised to Launch Pay-for-Reporting Program
Starting July 1, physicians who report on selected quality measures will have a chance to earn a small bonus payment from Medicare. The program, called the Physician Quality Reporting Initiative, was mandated by Congress and offers incentive payments...
Continuity of Care Is Critical
Preventive mental health rarely generates as much interest as when a tragedy brings to light its absence. In the wake of the recent mass shooting at Virginia Tech, the pervasive sense of disbelief that the 23-year-old gunman, Seung Hui Cho, was allowed...
Damming the Rivers of Racism
"No, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream." --Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., August 1963 Black History Month has come and gone. As usual, we celebrated the many...
Dementia Care: Go beyond Patient
BALTIMORE -- Supportive care for patients with dementia and their caregivers is an important component of overall dementia care, Dr. Constantine G. Lyketsos said at a meeting on Alzheimer's disease and related disorders sponsored by Johns Hopkins University....
Depression Care Moving into Patients' Homes
NEW ORLEANS -- Several home care organizations affiliated with hospitals in the New York metropolitan area have determined that nurses trained to screen for depression and to offer interventions can effectively improve outcomes in home-bound patients,...
Depression More Severe, TX Less Likely in Blacks
Black Americans with major depressive disorder experience greater disease severity than their white counterparts but are more likely not to receive treatment, David R. Williams, Ph.D., and his colleagues reported. Those findings, from the largest...
Depression Screening Warranted in Coronary Artery Disease Patients
ORLANDO -- Depression is not a proven risk factor for coronary artery disease events, but the data available now are compelling enough to warrant screening patients with coronary disease for depression and treating it when it's diagnosed. "Depression...
Disulfiram, Vaccine May Curb Cocaine Addiction
MENDOZA, ARGENTINA -- Two promising pharmacotherapies are currently in clinical trials for treatment of cocaine dependence: disulfiram and a vaccine consisting of a cocaine-cholera toxin complex, Dr. Thomas Kosten said at the Sixth World Congress of...
Employer-Based Insurance Coverage in Trouble
WASHINGTON -- Companies both large and small are finding it increasingly difficult to afford the health insurance coverage they have traditionally provided to their workers, experts warned at a conference sponsored by AcademyHealth. Employer-based...
FDA Calls for Expanded Warnings on Antidepressants
The warnings of an increased risk for suicidality in pediatric patients that appear on the labels of antidepressants should be expanded to include young adults aged 18-24 years but should include a statement saying that depression also is associated...
Gene Mutation Tied to 5% of Frontotemporal Dementia
SALZBURG, AUSTRIA -- Mutations in the progranulin gene are found in about 5% of patients with frontotemporal dementia, according to research presented at the 8th International Conference on Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases. Frontotemporal dementia...
Group Therapy Not for All Cancer Patients
As we know, treating the emotional aspects of cancer is an integral part of cancer care. Sometimes, group therapy can help these patients process their feelings about what is happening to them in a way that can prove beneficial. But group therapy can...
Guidelines Seek Tighter Opioid Therapy Control
SCOTTSDALE, ARIZ. -- Sustained opioid therapy should be prescribed only for chronic headache patients under stringent new guidelines that would exclude most headache patients, Dr. Joel R. Saper proposed at a symposium sponsored by the American Headache...
Intake of Fats, Carbs Can Affect Mood Disorders
MENDOZA, ARGENTINA -- The type of dietary fat and the relative amounts of fat and carbohydrates consumed in a normal diet can have a significant effect on mood disorders, Dr. Eva Albertsen Malt reported at the 6th World Congress of Depressive Disorders....
Intervention Improves Cognition in Schizophrenia
NEW YORK -- A recovery-phase intervention that is designed to improve cognition in patients with schizophrenia has shown significant and durable benefits, Shaun M. Eack said at the American Psychiatric Association's Institute on Psychiatric Services....
LDL below 100 mg/dL Deemed Not Low Enough
NEW ORLEANS -- Fully half of U.S. patients hospitalized for coronary artery disease now have an LDL cholesterol of 100 mg/dL or less on admission, according to a new report from the American Heart Association's Get With the Guidelines program. The...
Medical Schools Forecast 17% Enrollment Hike over 5 Years
First-year enrollment in U.S. medical schools is projected to increase 17% over the next 5 years to nearly 19,300 students, helping to ameliorate the real need for new physicians, according to an annual survey of medical-school expansion plans released...
Methamphetamine Use Adversely Affects Patients, Trauma Centers
FORT MYERS, FLA. -- Increasing methamphetamine use not only boosts violent injuries and law enforcement altercations among trauma patients, but it can create a significant financial burden for a level I trauma center, according to a study. Methamphetamine-positive...
Mirror Neurons May Have a Role in Emotional Processing
MADRID -- Mirror neurons fired when study subjects observed someone else performing an action, suggesting that those same neurons may also be active in emotional processing, Jess Kinross said in a poster presented at the 15th European Congress of Psychiatry....
Nationwide Survey Says 10% of HIV Is Resistant
LOS ANGELES -- Surveillance data indicate that 10% of people in the United States who become infected with HIV have acquired a virus with some resistance, Dr. Ulana Bodnar said at the 14th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. ...
New Antioxidant May Prevent Onset of Diabetes
NEW ORLEANS -- Succinobucol, a novel antioxidant with anti-inflammatory properties, achieved a 64% reduction in new-onset diabetes in patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome in the phase III Aggressive Reduction of Inflammation Stops Events...
New COX-2 Inhibitor Drug Called Nonapprovable by FDA
The Food and Drug Administration has issued a nonapprovable letter for the COX-2 inhibitor etoricoxib (Arcoxia), according to the drug's manufacturer, Merck & Co. The decision followed a 20-1 vote against approval, largely based on safety concerns...
Novel Drugs Highly Effective in Resistant HIV
LOS ANGELES -- Two novel HIV medications produced striking improvement in AIDS patients failing standard therapy, according to four separate studies presented at a conference on retroviruses and opportunistic infections. "The results here are as...
Opioid Regulations Often Misunderstood by Practitioners
SALT LAKE CITY -- State laws governing the availability and use of opioid analgesics are becoming less onerous, but confusion persists among regulators and practitioners, David E. Joranson said at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Hospice...
Palliative Care, Inpatient Psych Urged to Consult
SALT LAKE CITY -- Collaboration between palliative care and the psychiatric inpatient unit can greatly improve mental health care for nursing home residents with behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, according to presenters at the annual...
Parkinson's Drug Permax Withdrawn from Market
The manufacturers of the Parkinson's therapy Permax (pergolide) on March 29 agreed to take the dopamine agonist off the market as soon as possible, according to the Food and Drug Administration, which sought the recall. The FDA was spurred to take...
Perspective
"And it ought to be remembered that there is nothing more difficult to take in hand, more perilous to conduct, or more uncertain in its success, than to take the lead in the introduction of a new order of things. Because the innovator has for enemies...
Provigil Maker Cited after Promotion of Unapproved 'Fatigue' Indication
The Food and Drug Administration has sent a warning letter to the manufacturer of modafinil about promoting the drug for the treatment of fatigue associated with some neurologic and psychiatric disorders for which it is not approved. Promoting a...
Public Resists Electronic Personal Health Records
WASHINGTON -- President Bush, members of Congress, and key consumer organizations are all calling for broad implementation of electronic personal health records--and now it's time to convince the public of their worth, David Lansky, Ph.D., said at...
Root of Impulsive Aggression May Justify Meds
RANCHO MIRAGE, CALIF. -- A neurobiologic basis for impulsive aggression in patients with personality disorder lends itself to pharmacologic therapy, Dr. Emil F. Coccaro said at the annual meeting of the American College of Psychiatrists. This is...
Sildenafil May Benefit Some Patients with Heart Failure
SEATTLE -- A 12-week study of sildenafil therapy in patients with heart failure due to left ventricular dysfunction and secondary pulmonary hypertension is continuing after an interim analysis found neither therapeutic futility nor overwhelming improvements...
Strategies Offered for Helping Caregivers of OCD Patients
ST. LOUIS -- Millions of families in America are struggling with obsessive-compulsive disorder and, in many cases, fighting a losing battle against frustration, exhaustion, and anger, according to experts from the Menninger Clinic in Houston who spoke...
Sumatriptan-Naproxen Combo Beats Either Alone
A tablet combining sumatriptan and naproxen is more effective than either medication alone for treating acute migraine, reported Dr. Jan Lewis Brandes of the Nashville Neuroscience Group and her associates. The combination medication also was found...
Support Wavers for Brain Stimulation
RANCHO MIRAGE, CALIF. -- Two of the newer brain stimulation treatments for chronic depression took hits from the federal government in recent actions, Dr. William McDonald said at the annual meeting of the American College of Psychiatrists. As a...
Tales of Teen Bullying
Bullying covers a broad and nasty set of predatory behaviors by which the strong pick on the weak. Bullying seems to be spreading beyond the traditional confines of the school grounds and military indoctrination into the workplace and onto the Internet....
The Art of Katie Miller
Katie Miller may be only 23, but she already is comfortable with both the creative and business sides of the art world. She knew early on that she would pursue a career as a professional artist, so she worked hard to become comfortable with marketing...
The Murders at Virginia Tech by a Man Who Should Have Been under Mental Health Care Raise a Question for Psychiatry: What Can We Do to Prevent Such Tragedies?
The Virginia Tech murder rampage is a very dark page in the history of this country. For days after the rampage, the media was full of programs, articles, and editorials related to the shootings. We could not escape the horror and pain inflicted by...
Therapy for PTSD May Help Troubled Youth
ST. LOUIS -- A short course of therapy lasting less than a week may significantly reduce posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms for youths in short-stay facilities, Adrianna R. Wechsler reported at the annual meeting of the Anxiety Disorders Association...
Transference-Focused Therapy Eases Borderline
RANCHO MIRAGE, CALIF. -- Transference-focused psychotherapy for borderline personality disorder produced some beneficial changes not seen with two other forms of therapy in a randomized controlled study of 90 patients, Kenneth N. Levy, Ph.D., said...
Treating Autism-Related Behavioral Problems
Surveys have shown that half of young patients with autism spectrum disorders are prescribed psychotropics, but drug treatment for autism's core social and communication impairments remains "more a goal and a hope than a reality," said Dr. Bryan King,...
Treating Schizophrenia during Pregnancy
Pregnancy is a time of heightened vulnerability for women with schizophrenia and their offspring. Compared with women who are not mentally ill, those with schizophrenia have more unwanted sex and pregnancies, less prenatal care, a greater risk of...
Try D-Cycloserine and Exposure Therapy for OCD: Experimental Approach Also Achieves Long-Term Results in Treatment of Social Anxiety Disorder
ST. LOUIS -- The experimental concept of improving the treatment of anxiety disorders by combining exposure therapy with a medication got a boost from two pilot studies presented at the annual conference of the Anxiety Disorders Association of America....
Use Multidisciplinary Approach in Fibromyalgia
WASHINGTON -- Many fibromyalgia patients could benefit from the care and expertise provided by psychiatrists, Dr. Lesley M. Arnold said at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Clinical Psychiatrists. Psychiatrists are in a position to evaluate...
Use of Coercive Interventions Varies across Europe
MADRID -- The use of coercive interventions--such as physical or mechanical restraint--to control imminent and actual dangerous behavior by people with acute mental illness was discussed at a symposium at the 15th European Congress of Psychiatry. ...
What's in a Personality?
A few years ago, I wrote a column about renaming borderline personality disorder ("'Borderline' Label Needs a New Name," The Psychiatrist's Toolbox, July 2004, p. 30) and I received a great deal of mail on the subject. I still can't understand why,...
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