Clinical Psychiatry News

Clinical Psychiatry News is a monthly medical and psychiatry tabloid published since 1973 by the International Medical News Group. Subjects for Clinical Psychiatry News include psychology and psychiatry. The executive editor is Denise Fulton, and Gina Henderson is a senior editor.

Articles from Vol. 33, No. 1, January

Alcohol Tied to Worse PTSD in Assault Victims
NEW ORLEANS -- Female victims of sexual and physical assault show a high rate of postassault alcohol abuse, which is associated with a more severe course of posttraumatic stress disorder. Compared with nondrinking women, those with alcohol use disorders...
AMA Delegates Vote to Support Drug Importation
ATLANTA -- Delegates to the American Medical Association's 2004 interim meeting made a bold move to support prescription drug importation by wholesalers and pharmacies, provided that certain conditions were met to ensure patient safety. "Prescription...
Amisulpride's Real-World Benefit Shown in Schizophrenia
STOCKHOLM -- Amisulpride is associated with significant improvements in symptoms and decreases in concomitant medications among patients with schizophrenia, both in the short and long term, Michael Davidson, M.D., reported in a poster at the annual...
Anticonvulsant OK'd for Bipolar Mania
The Food and Drug Administration has approved an extended-release formulation of carbamazepine for acute manic and mixed episodes associated with bipolar disorder. Some psychiatrists said the drug, Equetro, made by Shire Pharmaceuticals Group PLC,...
Anticonvulsants in Psychiatry: Their Similarities Are Different; Part 1-Mechanism of Action
Issue All anticonvulsants reduce seizures, but not all anticonvulsants have identical pharmacologic mechanisms of action (1-8) Actions Learn the different mechanisms of action of anticonvulsants Benefits Understanding mechanism of action of anticonvulsants...
Aripiprazole: Dosing Tips and Prescribing Pearls
Brands * Abilify Generic not available in the United States, Europe, or Japan Class * Dopamine stabilizer Dopamine partial agonist, atypical antipsychotic, third generation antipsychotic; sometimes added as a second-generation antipsychotic;...
Atorvastatin May Slow Alzheimer's Disease: High-Dose Statin Therapy Slowed Cognitive Deterioration, Improved Depressive Symptoms
NEW ORLEANS -- High-dose atorvastatin in patients with Alzheimer's disease slowed progressive cognitive deterioration and improved depressive symptoms in a first-of-its-kind small, randomized, double-blind trial, D. Larry Sparks, Ph.D., said at the...
A Twist on Dual Diagnosis
Now that we are solidly in the 21st century and know the real health effects of cigarette smoking, we psychiatrists should be actively participating in smoking prevention and smoking-cessation treatments. As medical doctors, we need to change the...
Barriers to Buprenorphine Treatment Examined
WASHINGTON -- Buprenorphine was approved for the treatment of opioid dependence in 2002, but many physicians are hesitant to prescribe it despite being licensed to do so. Of more than 2.5 million opiate addiction patients in the United States, only...
Be Sure to Balance SSRI Benefits against Risks
WASHINGTON -- It is important to balance risks with benefits when considering a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor to treat a child or adolescent, several experts said at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry....
Bipolar Brains Exhibit Structural Abnormalities
STOCKHOLM -- The brains of bipolar patients show specific regional abnormalities that may be associated with the neurocognitive deficits that bipolar patients exhibit, Jair Soares, M.D., said at the annual meeting of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology....
Broadening Friendships beyond Medicine
Michael Myers, M.D., often hears physicians say they'd like to expand their circle of friends beyond their colleagues in medicine, but they're not sure how to go about it. "I hear so many first-person accounts from physicians who say it's really...
Choose Atypicals for Early Onset Schizophrenia: Two Drawbacks Are the Need for Slow Titration with Younger Patients and the High Cost of Newer Agents
NEW YORK -- A second-generation antipsychotic should be the first-line choice in early onset schizophrenia, Harvey N. Kranzler, M.D., said at the psychopharmacology update institute of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. The...
Clinical Psychiatry News' Top Stories of 2004: Developments on Antidepressant Labeling, Psychologist Prescribing Could Affect the Specialty
Debates over labeling rules for antidepressants that are given to children and adolescents took center stage last year in psychiatry. Other key psychiatric issues and trends of 2004 included the passage of a Louisiana law that opened the door for...
Coitus May Be the Best Sexual Stress Reliever
SANTA FE, N.M. -- It's been said that sex reduces stress, but all sexual activity is apparently not created equal. In a laboratory test intended to induce extreme stress, healthy subjects who reported engaging in penile-vaginal intercourse during...
Cranberry Juice's Preventive Effects Increase with Intake
BOSTON -- The more cranberry juice one drinks, the better its effectiveness at preventing bladder infections, a study has shown. Urine samples from volunteers who drank cranberry juice cocktail showed that 8 ounces of the drink resulted in the adherence...
Dissociative Reenactments May Help Abuse Victims: Expert Says Using Four Paradigms Can Lead to Breakthroughs in Treatment of Male Patients
NEW ORLEANS -- Dissociative reenactments of childhood sexual abuse play an important but particularly challenging role in the treatment of male victims of such abuse, Richard B. Gartner, Ph.D., said at the annual conference of the International Society...
Disulfiram Shows Promise for Cocaine Addiction
NEW YORK -- Disulfiram, a drug that has long been used for alcohol dependence, appears promising for the treatment of cocaine addiction, Thomas Kosten, M.D., said at the annual conference of the Association for Research in Nervous and Mental Disease....
Drug TX May Be Appropriate for Depression during Pregnancy
LOS ANGELES -- Caring for a pregnant woman with a history of depression means weighing the risks of fetal exposure to psychotropic medication against the consequences of the untreated illness, Vivien Burt, M.D., said at a psychopharmacology update...
Epilepsy Surgery Rated a Long-Term Success
SAN FRANCISCO -- Surgery for medically intractable partial epilepsy provides long-lasting efficacy, with nearly three-quarters of patients in one large series remaining essentially seizure free for up to 16 years, Gregory D. Cascino, M.D., reported...
FDA Approves New Sleep Aid
The Food and Drug Administration has approved a new, nonnarcotic therapy for insomnia, eszopiclone. Most sleep aids are approved for only short-term use of a week to 10 days, but eszopiclone can be safely prescribed for longer, according to the FDA....
FDA Plans to Strengthen Drug Safety Program
In the wake of the withdrawal of rofecoxib and the addition of a black box warning for antidepressants, the Food and Drug Administration has announced a plan aimed at strengthening its safety program for drugs. A main component of the plan is an...
FDA to Allow Radio Frequency Tags in Drug Labels
ROCKVILLE, MD. -- The Food and Drug Administration has reassured pharmaceutical companies that they can use radio frequency identification technology in product packaging without running afoul of agency rules, at least through 2007. "Today's actions...
Four Factors Useful in Identifying Eating Disorders in Girls
HONOLULU -- There are four factors that can help distinguish a girl who has an eating disorder from one who simply diets, Catherine M. Shisslak, Ph.D., said at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Association. More than 50% of adolescent...
Four-Visit Intervention Helps Back Pain Patients
HONOLULU -- A psychological intervention designed to help chronic back pain patients overcome fear of movement significantly reduced their activity limitations a year later, James E. Moore, Ph.D., said at the annual meeting of the American Psychological...
Fundamentals of Malpractice Risk Reduction
The risk of malpractice in psychiatry should not be overestimated: Claims are fewer in number and smaller in amount than in other specialties, and they have not increased notably in recent years. Still, 6%-7% of psychiatrists are sued each year, and...
Galantamine Shows Mixed Results for Vascular Dementia Patients
SAN FRANCISCO -- The widely used anti-Alzheimer's disease drug galantamine also is effective in the treatment of patients with vascular dementia, Dr. Alexander P. Auchus said at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology. Galantamine...
GAO: Medicare Call Centers' Correct Responses Have Flatlined
WASHINGTON -- Two years after the Government Accountability Office scolded Medicare for the inaccurate information its carrier call centers provided to physicians, a follow-up report finds that call-center performance has deteriorated even more. ...
Hispanic Suicide Rate Lower Than National Rate
In 2001, the overall age-adjusted suicide rate of 5.6/100,000 population among Hispanics was lower than the U.S. national rate of 10.7, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In the Hispanic population, the largest proportion...
Hospitalist Recruiters Have Trouble Filling Slots
Inpatient medicine is becoming a victim of its own success. Hospitalist programs are being set up faster than physicians can join them, and recruiters around the country are rushing to fill the empty slots. In a recent survey of 3,000 hospitals,...
IBS Drug Approved for Idiopathic Constipation
Tegaserod, approved in 2002 for constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome in women, was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration for treating chronic idiopathic constipation in women and men younger than 65. The approval of...
Imaging May Lead to Test for Bipolar
CHICAGO -- Magnetic resonance spectroscopy can identify distinct abnormalities in the brain chemistry of patients with bipolar disorder, opening up the possibility for a definitive diagnostic test, John D. Port, M.D., said at the annual meeting of...
Intervention's Benefits Persist in Depressed Elderly: New 2-Year Data Show Surprising Results
MARCO ISLAND, FLA. -- An intervention significantly increases depression-free days and improves physical functioning in the elderly--even 12 months later, Wayne J. Katon, M.D., reported at the annual meeting of the Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine....
Liability, Malpractice Top 2005 Health Agenda: Physician Groups Have Long Advocated a $250,000 Cap on Noneconomic Damages as Part of a Package
While medical liability and health care reform remain the top issues for many physicians this year, of particular urgency is a fix to Medicare's flawed payment formula, which threatens cuts of up to 5% in 2006 and cumulative cuts of 30% through 2012....
Medicare Advisers Weigh Pay for Performance
WASHINGTON -- The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission is considering redistributing 1%-2% of Medicare physician payments to physicians who demonstrate quality based on certain performance measures. But what measures to use, how to obtain the quality...
Medicare Drug Discount Cards Not Taking Hold
The Medicare-approved discount drugs cards, which have been available since last June, have been confusing for many Medicare beneficiaries, according to a survey commissioned by the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission. "They just see it as a big...
Modafinil Dose Higher in Narcolepsy Than Apnea
PHILADELPHIA -- The median dose of modafinil was 300 mg for patients with obstructive sleep apnea and 400 mg for patients with narcolepsy in long-term openlabel extensions of placebo-controlled trials, Jonathan Schwartz, M.D., said at the annual meeting...
More Collaborative Psychiatric Care Is Needed
TORONTO -- Pediatricians often prescribe medications for psychiatric disorders with an insufficient knowledge base and little collaborative help from psychiatrists, according to results of a cross-sectional survey of primary care pediatricians presented...
Naltrexone Therapy May Control Alcohol Abuse over Long Term
PARIS -- Long-term therapy with naltrexone can help keep alcohol-dependent patients on the wagon, Barbara J. Mason, Ph.D., said in a poster presentation at the 24th Congress of the Collegium Internationale Neuro-Psychophar-macologicum. In a controlled...
New Drugs Curb 'Off' Episodes in Advanced Parkinson's
SAN FRANCISCO -- A single dose of subcutaneous apomorphine rapidly and effectively reverses for at least 90 minutes the hypomobility, or "off," episodes that are common in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease, William C. Koller, M.D., said at...
New Drugs Emerging for Nicotine Dependence
NEW YORK -- With a fuller understanding of the neurobiology of tobacco dependence, potential therapeutic targets have emerged that suggest novel treatments for this devastating health problem, Robert Anthenelli, M.D., said at the annual conference...
New Public Health Program Targets Health Disparities
SAN DIEGO -- A new Howard University program offering a master's degree in public health aims to train leaders who will help eliminate racial and ethnic disparities in health. The degree program is the first to focus on health disparities using...
New Zealand Offers No-Fault Insurance Model
ALEXANDRIA, VA. -- In New Zealand, all physicians pay $700 a year for indemnity insurance, and it's nearly impossible to sue a physician. That's because New Zealand has had a no-fault injury compensation system in place for the last 30 years. ...
'Nickel and Dimed'
Over an expensive lunch with a high-powered New York editor at a tony French restaurant, Barbara Ehrenreich--a celebrated author with a Ph.D. in biology--conceived an idea to take a series of low-paying jobs and live solely on her wages. The resulting...
Novel Antipsychotics Found Effective in Bipolar Disorder
STOCKHOLM -- Novel antipsychotics are at least as effective as lithium and anticonvulsants in the short-term prevention of bipolar mania and, when combined with a mood stabilizer, seem to be effective in maintaining long-term remission, Eduard Vieta,...
Optimal Dose Offers the Most: Leveraging Secondary Pharmacologic Actions of Atypical Antipsychotics
All five first-line atypical antipsychotic agents entered the U.S. market with dosing recommendations that did not necessarily provide the most useful recipe for establishing maximal antipsychotic efficacy and tolerability of these agents in patients...
Parents of Eating Disorder Patients Join Forces: Group Training Program Aims to Give Families the Skills to Reinforce Positive Eating Habits in Adolescents
A new group skills-training program is exploring the vital role of parents as part of the treatment team for adolescents with eating disorders. "Most families have neither the skills nor the support to address eating disorders at home," said Nancy....
Patient Pain Often Persists after Discharge from ED, Studies Show
SAN FRANCISCO -- Many patients who come to emergency departments complaining of pain remain in pain after being sent home, even if they're discharged with pain medications, according to two prospective studies. Either pain management plans are inadequate,...
Patients Appear Honest about Crime Convictions
SCOTTSDALE, ARIZ. -- Mental health and substance abuse patients appear to be generally honest about reporting any criminal convictions, Logan Graddy, M.D., said in a poster presentation at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Psychiatry and...
Perspective
Many youth appropriately feel quite distressed over divorce, as the family world they have grown up with has undergone a radical change. Several researchers have developed strategies aimed at preventing these at-risk youth from having behavior and...
PET Study Reveals Brain Activation Differences: Cocaine Addicts Have an Increase in Activity after Methylphenidate Exposure, Nonaddicts a Decrease
PHILADELPHIA -- The activation of certain regions of a drug addict's brain following drug use may shed light on the compulsive nature of addiction, according to data presented at the annual meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine. Using [.sup.18]fluorodeoxyglucose...
Polypharmacy May Be Linked to Depression in the Elderly
LAS VEGAS -- Polypharmacy is a strong predictor of depression in an elderly patient. James Cassady, M.D., said in a poster presentation at the annual meeting of the American Geriatrics Society. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS)...
Propranolol, Other Drugs Eyed to Block PTSD: Idea Is That Blocking [Beta]-Adrenergic Receptors Might Tone Down Consolidation of Emotional Memories
Over the next several years, victims of car accidents, crimes, or other traumas who are treated at Boston's Massachusetts General Hospital will be offered a commonly used heart drug--the [beta]-adrenergic blocker propranolol--to potentially help lessen...
Protecting the Children of Divorce
No divorce is a good divorce, but when it comes to the kids, some divorces are clearly better than others. Research has shown that children of divorce are at high risk for depression and anxiety, behavior problems, and substance abuse. But studies...
Psychodynamic Therapy Recognized in Germany
ASPEN, COLO. -- Short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy demonstrated persuasive evidence of efficacy for a wide range of psychiatric disorders in a new metaanalysis, Falk Leichsenring, Ph.D., said at a psychiatry conference sponsored by the University...
Rx Mix-Ups Prompt Reminyl Name Change
Janssen Pharmaceutica has agreed to change the name of its Alzheimer's drug Reminyl in response to inadvertent dispensing of the oral blood glucose-lowering drug Amaryl in its place. The mix-ups have resulted in cases of severe hypoglycemia and other...
Schizophrenia's Multiple Domains
Schizophrenia has at least four distinct domains, and all four must be addressed to achieve an optimal outcome for a given patient. The four domains of schizophrenia are cognitive impairment, mood and suicidality, positive symptoms, and negative...
Signs of Alzheimer's Evident in Iris Murdoch's Final Novel
Famed British author Iris Murdoch suffered from Alzheimer's disease before her death in 1999, and her final novel contains evidence of her increasing disability, according to an analysis by Peter Garrard, M.D., of University College, London, and his...
Some U.S.-Born Hispanics at Higher Risk of Disorders
Mexican-American immigrants to the United States are far less likely than U.S.-born Mexican Americans to suffer from psychiatric disorders, lending credence to the theory that traditional cultural roles and ties to the "old country" are reassuring,...
Specialty Hospitals Getting Mixed Reviews
WASHINGTON -- Physicians and policy makers are divided on how to level the playing field on physician-owned specialty hospitals. While the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC) is considering reforms that would eliminate some of the financial...
Study of 8,000 N.Y. Kids Shows Impact of Sept. 11
NEW YORK -- Data from a study of more than 8,000 New York City school-children show marked increases in psychological and mood disorders among children who directly witnessed the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center. Not surprisingly,...
Study Shows High Rates of Psychiatric Polypharmacy
PHOENIX, ARIZ. -- Four out of five children and adolescents under psychiatric treatment were receiving pharmacotherapy in a recent study, and slightly more than half of these received more than one psychiatric medication, Joyce C. West, Ph.D., said...
Substance Abuse and SPMI Patients
The Problem You have a patient who has been diagnosed with a severe and persistent mental illness and alcohol dependence. This patient has been treated in a state hospital after being found not guilty of a crime by reason of insanity, and he is...
Substance Abuse, Not Mental Illness, Often Drives Homicides of Strangers
It is widely thought in Great Britain that the halving of the number of mental health beds between 1967 and 1997 increased the risk for random violence by mentally ill people now living in the community. But substance abuse rather than mental illness...
Suicide Risk Assessment Difficult in Jails, Prisons
SCOTTSDALE, ARIZ. -- Sometimes the importance of suicide risk assessment in correctional facilities can be brought home in very poignant ways, Michael Champion, M.D., said at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law. ...
Surviving without Liability Insurance-1 Year Later
For a little more than a year, Mark Macumber, M.D., has been conducting a health policy experiment--operating his medical practice without liability insurance. "The most surprising and rewarding thing is the response I get from the patients," said...
The Art of SylviAnn Murray
For SylviAnn Murray, painting has facilitated her healing. Ms. Murray's artwork brought up painful memories and feelings, but the act of creating forced her to confront and deal with those issues. Raised in Arlington, Tex., Murray attended the...
The Black Box Warning: A Mistake?
Many psychiatrists are distressed by the Food and Drug Administration's call for a warning on antidepressants given to children and adolescents. Is there anything we should do differently now when treating these young patients? Maintain Careful...
The Horizontal Filing Cabinet
Are there stacks and stacks of "important" tasks piled on your desk? If so, you're far from alone. Most of the physicians' desktops that I've seen are littered with letters, folders, journals, charts, mail, books, and other paraphernalia, often several...
Too Close for Comfort
"Closer," a new film directed by Mike Nichols, is an inquiry into the darker side of love. It deals with sexual obsession, possessiveness, intrusiveness, distrust, jealousy, and betrayal. In particular it is about the tenuous balance that exists, at...
Tort Reforms That Go beyond Caps Backed
ALEXANDRIA, VA. -- Traditional tort reform measures like damage caps won't address some of the fundamental problems with the medical liability system, experts said at a meeting on patient safety and medical liability sponsored by the Joint Commission...
Valproate Use Related to PCOS in 10% of Bipolar Women
PHOENIX, ARIZ. -- Valproate used as a mood stabilizer in bipolar disorder can cause polycystic ovary syndrome in about 10% of the women who take it, according to study results presented by Hadine Joffe, M.D., of Harvard Medical School, Boston. The...
Welcome
Welcome ... to the Neuroscience Education Institute's (NEI) inaugural newsletter, Psychopharmacology Education Update, or PsychEd Up. We are launching the newsletter as a service to the psychopharmacology community. I will serve as the editor-in-chief...
Yoga Improves Endothelial Dysfunction in Heart Patients
NEW ORLEANS -- Six weeks of yoga training and meditation resulted in markedly improved endothelial function in a group of patients with cardiovascular disease, Satish Sivasankaran, M.D., reported at the annual scientific sessions of the American Heart...
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