Clinical Psychiatry News

Clinical Psychiatry News is a monthly medical and psychiatry tabloid published since 1973 by the International Medical News Group. Subjects for Clinical Psychiatry News include psychology and psychiatry. The executive editor is Denise Fulton, and Gina Henderson is a senior editor.

Articles from Vol. 38, No. 7, July

Abeta Fragments May Thwart AD Treatment
Small fragments of the beta amyloid peptide, previously thought to be nontoxic to the brain, may actually be part of the root cause of Alzheimer's disease, new research findings suggest. These small beta amyloid (Abeta) fragments group together...
Adolescent Addiction Centers Light Up on Cue
TORONTO -- Functional magnetic resonance imaging has shown that even very low levels of nicotine exposure can cause detectable changes in the adolescent brain's addiction centers, some of which differ from nicotine-related changes seen in adult brains,...
Both DSM and ICD Systems Are Needed
Classifying diseases in the mental health domain has been important in many ways. It helps in the management, planning, and subsequent follow-up of patients, and it helps with record keeping and preserving prevalence and incidence trends. Trainees...
Brain Exercises Fail to Improve Memory, Cognitive Function
"Brain training" does not improve general cognitive function, according to a 6-week trial of more than 11,000 participants. The study results "provide no evidence for any generalized improvements in cognitive function following brain training in...
CMS Extends Incentives for Early E-Prescribing
LONG BEACH, CALIF. -- The inability to prescribe controlled substances electronically is slowing adoption of electronic prescribing, but financial incentives could make it worthwhile for physicians who see patients covered by Medicare to start "e-prescribing"...
Fink! Still at Large: A Study of Interns Showed That Up to 25% Develop Depressive Symptoms before Their Internships Are over. How Might Medical Education Be Changed to Make This Less Likely?
Psychiatrists should not be surprised to learn that many medical interns develop symptoms of moderate to severe depression. A recent study based on a large sample of medical interns found that about 3% of these individuals had depressive symptoms before...
Five New Members Join
Antonio Y. Hardan, M.D. Dr. Hardan is an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences in the child and adolescent division at Stanford (Calif.) University. He is director of the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Clinic at Lucile...
For Children on Antipsychotics, Metabolic Changes Occur Rapidly
NEW ORLEANS -- Worrisome and clinically measurable metabolic changes can be seen in just 12 weeks among children and adolescents who received antipsychotic medications in a National Institutes of Health-sponsored study, prompting serious concern among...
Healthy Lifestyle Linked to Lower Mortality Risk for Stroke Patients
TORONTO -- Even after having a stroke, people who maintain a healthy lifestyle can reduce the risk of death, and the more healthy lifestyle practices they follow, the greater the benefit, according to data from 388 stoke survivors. Those who did...
Injectable Naltrexone Helps Patients Remain Opioid-Free
Once-monthly treatment with extended-release injectable naltrexone helped patients who were dependent on opioids maintain an opioid-free state after detoxification, results from a placebo-controlled study demonstrated. After 24 weeks of treatment,...
Mentalization Model Targets Trauma Recovery
WASHINGTON -- The mentalization-based approach to the treatment of trauma is rooted in a distinction between four polarities involved in mentalizing: automatic/controlled, internal/external, self/other, and cognitive/affective, Patrick Luyten, Ph.D.,...
Military Needs Trained Psychiatrists
I was distressed by Col. Charles C. Engel's glowing review of the RESPECT-Mil program ("More Soldiers Getting Care for Depression, PTSD," November 2009, p. 1). The article said the model "addresses some of the challenges that have kept soldiers...
Nicholas Kristof's Call for Compassion
If I look at the mass, I will never act. If I look at the one, I will. --MOTHER TERESA Reporter," Eric Daniel Metzgar's absorbing if poorly titled new feature documentary film about the New York Times op-ed columnist, Nicholas Kristof, opens with...
Patient Choice in Treatment of PTSD Might Boost Adherence
BOCA RATON, FLA. -- Patients with posttraumatic stress disorder permitted to choose either 10 weeks of prolonged exposure therapy or sertraline had better adherence and treatment response, compared with others randomly assigned to the intervention...
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NIMH Director Denies Conflict Dr. Thomas R. Insel, director of the National Institute of Mental Health, is denying a report in the Chronicle of Higher Education that he assisted a former colleague in securing a new position after the person was...
Preteen Marijuana Use Boosts Risk for Depression, PTSD
SAN FRANCISCO -- Substance-dependent young people who started smoking marijuana in their preteen years entered treatment with greater impairments than did those who started using marijuana as teenagers in a study of 136 patients in residential treatment....
Proposed DSM Revisions Prompt Vigorous Debate
NEW ORLEANS -- If the DSM-5 will one day be a butterfly, the document today can best be thought of as a poky caterpillar, voraciously consuming its way toward a faraway date when it could take flight. Ten years into the revision process, the unprecedented...
PTSD and the Gulf Oil Spill
Awareness and treatment strategies for posttraumatic stress disorder should be at the forefront of mental health care in the Gulf states. After all, the Gulf oil spill is now ranked as the greatest man-made disaster this country has ever seen. Usually,...
Report Highlights Gaps in Alzheimer's Research
BETHESDA, MD. -- Current knowledge about the epidemiology of Alzheimer's disease and cognitive decline has not provided enough evidence to recommend specific, preventive interventions, according to a draft "state-of-the-science" report issued by a...
Sexual Aggression May Be Common in Nursing Homes
ORLANDO -- Sexually aggressive behavior might be common between nursing home residents, according to a focus group study. Most sexual aggression against older adults occurs in long-term care facilities rather than in community settings, according...
'Substance Use Disorder' Diagnosis Gains Favor: DSM-5 Work Group Questions Current Distinction between Substance 'Abuse' and 'Dependence'
NEW ORLEANS -- Proposed changes to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual will likely put an end to separate diagnoses of substance "abuse" and "dependence," distinctions that puzzled even addiction experts, members of the DSM-5 work group on substance-related...
Suicide Survivors Often Retain Their Fearlessness
ORLANDO -- Precipitating symptoms for suicide and ideation often improve rapidly after someone survives a suicide attempt. However, mental health professionals should remain vigilant until multiple evaluations demonstrate the resolution of a patient's...
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