Clinical Psychiatry News

Clinical Psychiatry News is a monthly medical and psychiatry tabloid published since 1973 by the International Medical News Group. Subjects for Clinical Psychiatry News include psychology and psychiatry. The executive editor is Denise Fulton, and Gina Henderson is a senior editor.

Articles from Vol. 39, No. 11, November

Amygdalae May Be Key in Panic Daisorder/hypermobility Link
FROM THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE AMERICAN NEUROPSYCHIATRIC ASSOCIATION DENVER - The common denominator between joint hypermobility and panic disorder might lie in the significantly enlarged amygdalae shown to be present in individuals with lax joints...
Autism Can Be Diagnosed in Children with Down Syndrome
FROM THE JOURNAL OF INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY RESEARCH Children with Down syndrome can be diagnosed with autism via the autism spectrum disorder criteria from the DSM, based on results of a cluster analysis of 293 children with Down syndrome. Previous...
Camouflaging Informed Consent
In 1972, Canterbury v. Spence changed American health law, and with it, the patient-physician relationship. Some ethicists cite this as the beginning of modern medical ethics. Before a patient agreed to a surgical procedure, he was to be informed about...
Chemical Suicides May Be on Upswing in U.S
FROM MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT Anovel method of suicide - which poses nearly as much danger to rescue personnel as to victims - appears to be gaining popularity in the United States. Ten chemical suicides in cars occurred in the United...
Cognitive Therapy Beats Escitaloprarn for PTSD Symptoms
FROM ARCHIVES OF GENERAL PSYCHIATRY Cognitive therapy after trauma appears to reduce the symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, whether administered immediately after a traumatic event or delayed for several months, a study has shown. Escitalopram...
Daily Headache Diary Improves Diagnosis
FROM THE INTERNATIONAL HEADACHE CONGRESS BERLIN - Asking patients to fill out a daily diary 1 month before their initial evaluation improves the accuracy of their headache diagnosis compared with clinical evaluation alone, according to a prospective,...
Depression Raises Mortality in Type 2 Diabetes
FROM THE ANNUAL SCIENTIFIC SESSIONS OF THE AMERICAN DIABETES ASSOCIATION SAN DIEGO - Depression is a significant independent predictor of increased mortality and may increase the risk of macrovascular events in adults with type 2 diabetes, a data...
Disgust' Gains Respect in OCD Research
EXPERT ANALYSIS FROM THE ANNUAL CONGRESS OF THE EUROPEAN COLLEGE OF NEUROPSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY PARIS - Obsessive-compulsive disorder with contamination obsession might have two clinical subtypes - one rooted in anxiety and another in which the core...
Excessive Drinking Cost $223.5 Billion in 2006
FROM THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PREVENTIVE MEDICINE In 2006, the overall costs from excessive drinking in the United States reached $223.5 billion, according to findings from a new study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention....
Families in Psychiatry: Reconceptualizing Family
Bob is in the kitchen, settling down his family to preparing a celebration dinner with produce from the communal garden. He is a tall, wiry man with a gray beard and kind gentle eyes. His current family includes his wife, who is a therapist in a nearby...
FDA Approves First Potassium Channel Opener for Seizures
Ezogabine has been approved as adjunctive therapy for partial onset seizures in adults but will not be available until later this year. Ezogabine is the first neuronal potassium channel opener approved for treating epilepsy, according to a Food...
Final Rule on ACOs Gets High
Use of electronic health records is no longer a condition for participating in an accountable care organization, according to the Oct. 20 final rule that will govern how ACOs are constructed and how they will be paid. The change is just one of many...
Fink! Still at Large: An Internet-Based Survey Suggests That a Large Percentage of Patients with Depression Lie to Their Doctors. Have You Been Misled by Patients? If So, How Has This Compromised Therapy?
The survey, conducted in Japan, opens an important subject in psychiatry. In a large study of 2,020 patients, Dr. Norifusa Sawada and colleagues reported that patients who had received treatment for depression within the past year, a full 70.2% had...
Florida Doctors Get OK to Counsel Patients on Guns-For Now
A U.S. District Court judge has granted a preliminary injunction that stops Florida from enforcing a new law barring physicians from asking their patients about firearms ownership, saying that the law might be unconstitutional and has a good chance...
Headache Sidelines Two-Thirds of Soldiers
FROM CEPHALALGIA Soldiers evacuated from current war zones with a headache diagnosis are unlikely to return to duty, a new retrospective study has found. Only about a third of these soldiers were able to return to duty, even after receiving treatment,...
High-Risk Specialty Doctors Face a Claim by 65
FROM THE NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE Physicians in high-risk specialties face a near certainty of a malpractice claim at some point in their careers, but only a small minority will end up making an indemnity payment to a patient. The probability...
Homosexual Activity Plus Methamphetamine Ups HIV Risk
FROM ARCHIVES OF PEDIATRIC AND ADOLESCENT MEDICINE Among boys and young men who have sex with men, those who also use methamphetamine appear to be at increased risk for HIV infection, according to a report in the journal. Compared with males...
MedPAC Votes to Cut Payments to Specialists
FROM A MEETING OF THE MEDICARE PAYMENT ADVISORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON - Expert members of the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission voted last month to present their Medicare physician pay fix plan to Congress, despite the objections of specialist...
Mild TBI, PTSD May Co-Occur in Veterans: Key Challenge Is Engaging Soldier or Veteran in Conversations That Can Help Clinician Evaluation
EXPERT ANALYSIS FROM A CONFERENCE ON THE COMPLEXITIES AND CHALLENGES OF PTSD AND TBI BOSTON - For clinicians evaluating returning soldiers for posttraumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury, one of the greatest obstacles may be the soldiers'...
Off-Label Use of Atypicals Proves Minimally Effective
FROM JAMA A typical antipsychotics are effective in only a few of the many off-label conditions for which they are currently used, according to a meta-analysis. In particular, there is no good evidence to support the use of atypical antipsychotics...
Pain with PTSD May Yield to CAM Techniques
EXPERT ANALYSIS FROM THE ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON THE COMPLEXITIES AND CHALLENGES OF PTSD AND TBI BOSTON - Cognitive therapies and acupuncture can be as powerful as narcotics and analgesics for treating the chronic pain associated with posttraumatic...
Risperidone Falls Short in SRI-Resistant PTSD
FROM JAMA The antipsychotic drug risperidone does not improve posttraumatic stress disorder in veterans whose symptoms are resistant to serotonin reuptake inhibitors, according to a report in the journal. Risperidone was not superior to placebo...
'Shocking' Percentage of Patients on Triptans despite Risks
FROM THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE AMERICAN NEUROLOGICAL ASSOCIATION SAN DIEGO - Triptans are routinely prescribed to migraine patients who have a history of cardiovascular disease, according to evidence from a large medical claims database study. ...
Shrink Rap News: Psychiatrists and Social Networking
Your friends are on Facebook, your patients are on Facebook, and they talk about their interactions during sessions. Even your mother is on Facebook. If you're like most psychiatrists, you're not on Facebook. A survey conducted by the Maryland Psychiatric...
Social Phobia in Youth: More Than Just Shyness
FROM PEDIATRICS Social phobia is an impairing psychiatric disorder that transcends typical human shyness, according to findings from the National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent Supplement, which examined the rate of shyness and its overlap with social...
SSRIs, Limb Movements of Sleep Linked in Kids
FROM PEDIATRIC NEUROLOGY Children who are treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have fivefold greater odds of experiencing periodic limb movements of sleep than do those who are not treated with SSRIs, according to findings from a...
Taming Obesity: A Multidisciplinary Problem
The diversity of disciplines represented at the annual meeting of the Obesity Society parallels the reach of the obesity epidemic itself Primary care physicians, endocrinologists, pharmacologists, bariatric surgeons, psychiatrists, psychologists,...
TBI Might Double Risk of Developing Dementia
FROM THE ALZHEIMER'S ASSOCIATION INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE 2011 PARIS - Traumatic brain injury might double the risk of developing dementia, according to findings from a study of more than 280,000 U.S. veterans. The risk of dementia over 7 years...
The Right Question Can Change a Life
The DSM is aimed at promoting "reliable research, accurate diagnosis [based on symptoms], thus appropriate treatment and patient care." But sometimes patients present with symptoms that are not covered in the manual. This was the case for a patient...
Use of Stimulants for ADHD Still on Rise
FROM THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY Patient age plays a large role in changes over time to stimulant use for treatment of attentiondeficit / hyperactivity disorder, according to a study of survey data from 1996 to 2008. Differences in ethnicity,...
Violence Raises Women's Risk of Mental Disorders
FROM JAMA Violence against women is significantly associated with mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders throughout the victim's life-time, according to a report. Moreover, the relationship appears to be dosely related with higher rates of...
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