CLIO

This international triennial journal publishes scholarly essays in three areas: literature informed by historical understandings, historical writings considered as literature philosophy and philosophy of history, with an interest in Hegel.

Articles from Vol. 22, No. 2, Winter

Changing Regimes: The Case of Rip Van Winkle
SOCRATES: . . . Now, that this prize of being educated by Zeus, is not distributed by Homer to any other hero except Minos--this is amazing praise. . . . For to be the child of Zeus, the only one to have been educated by Zeus, is praise that...
Edmund Wilson and the Problem of Marx: History, Biography, and 'To the Finland Station.'
Edmund Wilson's To the Finland Station begins by tracing the intellectual roots of Marxist historiography. But by the time we meet Vladimir Ulyanov (Lenin) in the last third of this study, Wilson has reduced his frame to narrow psycho-biography. Lenin's...
Prospero's Books and Stephano's Bottle: Colonial Experience in 'The Tempest.'
For government [of conquered people] consists in nothing else but so controlling subjects that they shall neither be able to, nor have cause to, do you harm; which may be done either by making quite sure of them by depriving them of all means...
Stendhal's Reformulation of the Epic and the Idyll in 'Le Rouge et le Noir.'
Throughout his autobiographical writings, Stendhal professes a simultaneous attraction to and distance from his contemporary culture. Although deeply fascinated by the subject of politics, he remains alienated from its contemporary manifestations--namely,...
The Eighteenth Brumaire of Abraham Lincoln: Revolutionary Rhetoric and the Emergence of the Bourgeois State
"Things are taking a revolutionary turn," wrote Marx in 1862: Lincoln knows what Europe does not know, that . . . New England and the Northwest . . . are determined to force on the government a revolutionary waging of the war and to inscribe...