Film Criticism

Academic film journal publishes articles on different disciplines, cultures and critical perspectives.

Articles from Vol. 35, No. 2-3, Winter-Spring

A Dialogue through Memories: Still Walking
The link between memory and identity is the wellspring for Kore-eda Hirokazu's work in such films as Maborosi (Maborosi no hikari, 1995), Without Memory (Kioku ga ushinawareta toki, 1996), After Life (Wandafuru raifu, 1998), Distance (Disutansu, 2001),...
After Life." History, Memory, Trauma and the Transcendent
(i) Synopsis The recently deceased enter a way-station, a limbo, here pictured as a rather drab institutional-style building, attended by civil servants, who are themselves deceased. The counselors help the newly dead pick a single memory to stay...
Envisioning a Community of Survivors in Distance and Air Doll
Introduction All across the world today the sense of a national community has been eroded. This is especially true of Japan, which was cast into recession in the early 1990s and reacted to globalization with neoliberal policies that advocated an...
Filmography
Feature Films Maborosi (Maborosi no hikari, 1995), 110 minutes. Director: Kore-eda. Executive Producer: Shigenobu Yutaka. Producer: Gozu Naoe. Screenplay: Ogita Yoshihisa, from the story "Maborosi no hikari" by Miyamoto Teru. Cinematography:...
Introduction: Kore-Eda Hirokazu, Director at a Crossroads
Why Kore-eda Hirokazu? Why a Special Issue devoted to this Japanese director rather than other filmmakers of his generation, like Shinozaki Makoto, Aoyama Shinji, Suwa Nobuhiro, and Kawase Naomi, with whom he has been grouped in the so-called "New...
Kore-Eda Hirokazu Interview
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] I interviewed Kore-eda Hirokazu on April 5, 2010 in a meeting room in the gleaming modern office of TV Man Union, the TV production company where he has worked since the start of his career. Unlike some directors who rattle...
Kore-Eda's Children: An Analysis of Lessons from a Calf, Nobody Knows, and Still Walking
Midnight Eye: You seem to really like children. Kore-eda: I don't know if l like children in general, but 1 like the kids in the film [Nobody Knows] very much. [...] ! felt a great responsibility towards them, which made me want to show their personal...
Kore-Eda's Maborosi: Showing Only What Is Necessary
Kore-eda Hirokazu's first films were television documentaries, ones that are still remembered for their honesty and insight. These qualities were those he brought to this first feature film, an adaptation of a Miyamoto Teru novel he admired, Maborosi...
Kore-Eda's Ocean View
Kore-eda Hirokazu's films are punctuated by bodies of water. This is not the most obvious element of his filmmaking, but it is one of the most profound. In situations with no clear answers, bodies of water (tributaries, lakes, oceans) offer a troubled...
Laughter and Tears: The Social Critiques of Kore-Eda's Hana and Yamanaka Sadao's Humanity and Paper Balloons
Introduction This essay seeks to shed light on Kore-eda Hirokazu's Hana (Hana yori mo naho, 2006) by setting it in the context of a tradition of subversive and socially critical jidai-geki (Japanese period films) most precisely exemplified by the...
Reality's Poetry: Kore-Eda Hirokazu between Fact and Fiction
One only needs to click into the Internet Movie Database (IMDb) to make sure that the three most famous fiction features by the Japanese director Kore-eda Hirokazu are Maborosi (Maborosi no hikari, 1995), After Life (Wandarufu raifu, 1998), and Nobody...
Why Nobody Knows-Family and Society in Modern Japan
In 2004, child actor Yagira Yuya, who had been twelve years old at the time that filming began, became the youngest person ever to win a Best Actor award at Cannes for his performance as Fukushima Akira in Nobody Knows (Dare mo shiranai, 2004). Although...