Frontiers - A Journal of Women's Studies

Frontiers - A Journal of Women's Studies is a magazine specializing in women's topics.

Articles from Vol. 29, No. 2-3, June-September

Foreword
Dear Readers, This special double issue of Frontiers had its origins in a session at the 2005 Berkshire Conference on the History of Women devoted to the topic of intermarriage and North American Indians, in which three soon-to-be intrepid guest...
Introduction
As a form of conquest, intimate relations in colonial settings have long tantalized observers, but since the 1980s these relationships have gained center stage. Sylvia Van Kirk's Many Tender Ties and Jennifer S. H. Brown's Strangers in Blood--both...
Making Stories (Artist's Statement)
As both artist and cultural historian, I am drawn to the stories and artistic legacy of Indigenous women, particularly those I am descended from. I have always liked stories, and as long as I can remember they took visual form as I listened, sometimes...
Miengun's Children: Tales from a Mixed-Race Family
Mrs. Jessie W. Hilton of Albuquerque, N.M., who summers at her cottage Mi-en-gun Walszh (Wolf's Den) in Northport, was hostess at 5:00 o'clock Wednesday at Schuler's of this city honoring Mrs. C. Stuker of Oak Park, III., house guest of her sister,...
Red, White, and Black: A Personal Essay on Interracial Marriage
About a month before my father died, a long-held question spilled out of my ten-year-old mouth. "Daddy, why do you hate colored people so much and love Mama?" The silence that filled the kitchen where my mother was cooking blocked out the evening news...
Renegotiating Identity; "Primitivism" in 20th Century Art as Family Narrative
The prevailing viewpoint is made all too clear in one of the "affinities" featured on the catalogue covers, a juxtaposition of Picasso's Girl before a Mirror ... with a Kwakiutl half-mask, a type quite rare among Northwest coast creations. Its task...
The Benefits of Being Indian: Blood Quanta, Intermarriage, and Allotment Policy on the White Earth Reservation, 1889-1920
Between 1889 and 1920 the allotment policy imposed by the US government on the peoples of the White Earth Reservation made tribal membership, once regulated by the Anishinaabeg themselves, an unstable and treacherous issue. Suddenly, no one really...
The Narrative of Nancy, a Cherokee Woman
On November 24,1801, Nancy, "by appearance an Indian woman," gave testimony at Fort Southwest Point, a garrison in eastern Tennessee established in 1792 to defend white settlements against Indian attack. (1) In a statement recorded under the title...
"You Think It Strange That I Can Love an Indian"; Native Men, White Women, and Marriage in the Indian Service
The history of intermarriage between whites and American Indians is a half-told tale. Scholars have produced an impressive body of work on the political and economic benefits that accrued from pairings between white men and Native women, but the literature...