NBER Reporter

Online publication provides economic research to policymakers, business professional and the academic community. The topics include, banks, financial markets, health insurance, labor market, technology and more.

Articles from Vol. 2015, No. 1, Spring

2014 Awards and Honors
A number of NBER researchers received honors, awards, and other forms of professional recognition during 2014. A list of the honors reported by these researchers, excluding those that were bestowed by the researcher's home university, is presented...
Assessing the Effects of Monetary and Fiscal Policy
Monetary and fiscal policies are central tools of macroeconomic management. This has been particularly evident since the onset of the Great Recession in 2008. In response to the global financial crisis, U.S. short-term interest rates were lowered to...
Health Economics
The NBER Program in Health Economics focuses on the determinants and consequences of differences in health outcomes. Program members have continued their long-standing interests in such basic determinants of health as substance use, obesity, and formal...
Industrial Organization
The NBER's Program on Industrial Organization, directed by Jonathan Levin of Stanford University, met in Palo Alto on February 20 and 21. NBER Research Associates Michael Dickstein of Stanford University and Ali Hortacsu of the University of Chicago...
New Perspectives on the First Wave of Globalization
The first "Great Wave of Globalization," during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, witnessed a historically unprecedented rise in spatial economic integration. Between 1850 and 1913, transportation costs plummeted, information flows accelerated,...
Pricing and Marketing Household Financial Services in Developing Countries
Retail financial institutions worldwide are facing greater competition and regulatory scrutiny. This makes it increasingly important for them to understand the drivers of consumer demand for basic financial services if they are to maximize profits,...
Slower U.S. Growth in the Long- and Medium-Run
The annual growth rate of U.S. percapita real GDP remained remarkably steady at 2.1 percent between 1890 and 2007. Until recently, it was widely assumed that the Great Recession of 2007-09 and the slow recovery since 2009 represented only a temporary...
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