Nine

Publication covering sports, fitness and history.

Articles from Vol. 16, No. 1, Fall

A Glimpse of the St. Paul Colored Gophers (1909) and the Schenectady Mohawk Giants (1913)
The St. Paul Gophers of 1909 were an excellent regional team and the Schenectady Mohawk Giants of 1913 were one of the best teams outside of organized baseball. Figure 1 is a proud, yet serious portrait of the St. Paul Colored Gophers, taken after...
A "Yaller Kivered" Game: New York-Style Baseball Comes to Racine
While the old game is manly and full of life, health and vigor and pleasing to behold, the new "yaller kivered" game is indolent, sickly, puerile, effeminate, and disgusting to behold. Racine Journal, August 1867 INTRODUCTION By the early 1860s...
Baseball's Divisional Playoffs: A Better Format
INTRODUCTION Major League Baseball's divisional playoff format has a major flaw. Sometimes the "reward" for achieving the number one seed is having to play the best of the three other teams in the divisional playoffs. Of course, this outcome is...
From the Curse to Its Reverse: Red Sox Nation in Films, 1992-2005
The feature films discussed in this article portray a range of representations of the Red Sox mythos, primarily centered around the "curse of the Bambino" and its reverse. (1) The only movie that is openly and fully concerned with the Red Sox is Fever...
"Get Those Niggers off the Field!": Racial Integration and the Real Curse in the History of the Boston Red Sox
Facing the risk of being banned in Boston, not to mention from NINE, we thought it might be worthwhile to say a word or two up front about our choice of title for these thoughts you are about to read. Given the subject matter, our choice was driven...
Jim Mann: 3N2 Baseball
Jim Mann, a shoe engineer and ex-Nike technician, is cofounder of 3N2, a start-up company that makes baseball and softball shoes. Forty-two years old, six feet tall, and built like a catcher, Mann is a former ballplayer and champion race walker who...
Minimum Quality Standards in Professional Baseball and the Paradoxical Disappearance of the .400 Hitter
In 1941 Ted Williams batted .406, thus accomplishing for the final time a feat that was once relatively common in Major League Baseball. By the time "Teddy Ballgame" surpassed the mark, .400 hitters had already become rare. As table 1 shows, twenty-two...
On Historical Grounds: The Expos Emerge
PAINFUL BEGINNINGS The Montreal Expos completed their first decade in the National League with a milestone victory. Before a sparse crowd of 6,182 at Busch Stadium in St. Louis, left-handed pitcher Ross Grimsley defeated the Cardinals by a margin...
Reconnecting the Baseball Star
If Babe Ruth were a sports star in the digital age, how would the media handle him? Consider the event enshrined as the "bellyache heard round the world," Ruth's physical setback before the 1925 season. The crisis begins at spring training, where he...
Smartball: Are Low-Revenue Teams Redefining the Market for Baseball Talent?
INTRODUCTION In Moneyball Michael Lewis argued that the recent success of the low-revenue Oakland Athletic was the consequence of a new strategy for building an MLB team that was the brainchild of general manager Billy Beane. (1) This strategy placed...
The Church of Baseball and the U.S. Presidency
American sociologists and historians muse whether an atheist could be elected president of the United States of America. Until John F. Kennedy, there had not even been a Roman Catholic president. Political pundits identified John Kerry's failure to...
Two Roads Diverged
When I first pondered what the subject of my keynote speech at the 2006 NINE conference might be, I came up with "Present at the Creation: Baseball's Pioneering Clubs, 1830-50." That's what attendees saw in their programs. I had intended to talk about...