Communication Studies

Publication covering communication, language and linguistics.

Articles from Vol. 51, No. 1, Spring

Chinese-American Children's Ethnic Identity: Measurement and Implications
Cultural diversity is a reality in contemporary American society. Cultural and ethnic differences have been frequently addressed sociologically, historically, and politically as a social problem or a source of social conflicts, and related to social...
Culture and Information Manipulation Theory: The Effects of Self-Construal and Locus of Benefit on Information Manipulation
Deception is one of the most significant and pervasive social phenomena of our age (Miller & Stiff, 1993), and has frequently been the focus of communication and psychological inquiry. Knapp, Hart, and Dennis (1974) suggest deception is "publicly...
Pre-Inception Rhetoric in the Creation of a Social Movement: The Case of Frances Wright
Frances Wright D'Arusmont, more commonly known as Fanny Wright, is a rhetorical enigma. From 1825 to 1835, she was a household name in the United States (Kissel, 1993, p. ii), who was adored and respected by some, hated, feared, and vilified by more....
Robert Taft and Nuremberg: The Verdict of Time
On October 5, 1946, Senator Robert Taft spoke at Kenyon College, Gambier Ohio, as part of a three-day convocation on "The Heritage and Responsibility of the English-Speaking Peoples." The topic of Taft's speech was Anglo-American law and justice, a...
Who Are We and Who Am I? Gadamer's Communal Ontology as Palimpsest
As a convention of academic writing, "we" means sometimes literally group authorship, or sometimes merely its pretence; sometimes it implies a community of scholars or a group of adherents, the amorphous crowd of author and readers; more often it is...

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