Studia Anglica Posnaniensia: international review of English Studies

Articles from Vol. 38, Summer

A Re-Classification of Old English Nouns
ABSTRACT The standard classification of Old English nominal inflections, employing the Proto-Germanic root structure, fails to reflect synchronic features of the system. This paper follows Kastovsky (1995) and Lass (1997) in rejecting the traditional...
Caroline Spurgeon-English Studies, the United States, and Internationalism
ABSTRACT Analysis of the difficult establishment of the first woman professor of English English Studies, Caroline Spurgeon, in the Anglo-Saxon and European contexts reveals crucial but much neglected traits of the history of the discipline. Among...
Determination and Interpretation of Semantic Lexical Underspecification in Old English Homilies
ABSTRACT One of the most challenging problems facing lexical semantics of old texts, like Old English homilies, is to explain how unspecified meanings are "controlled" allowing the proper senses to be selected and deployed to achieve successful...
Epic or Romance: Authorial Concept of Genre in Middle English Visions of Troy
ABSTRACT Middle English narratives of the Trojan War are commonly classified as romances. Their authors, however, are aware of the generic differences between romance and epic and see their works as a continuation of the epic tradition. In authorial...
Free Variation and Other Myths: Interpreting Historical English Spelling
ABSTRACT The paper considers the interpretation of orthographic variation in Middle English texts, focussing on the question to what extent it is justifiable to use such variation as phonological evidence. It is suggested that all written variation,...
Internal Exile: Dorothea of Montau's Inward Journey
ABSTRACT This paper deals with the physical as well as spiritual dimension of pilgrimage on the basis of the life of Dorothea of Montau as recounted by John of Marienwerder. Dorothea's extensive traveling, her marital problems, her visions and the...
Language in Time: A Lesson Functionalists May Learn from Margaret Schlauch
ABSTRACT In the article, we attempt to explore Schlauch's understanding of synchrony and diachrony as seen in the context of her views on language non-autonomy as well as to relate the findings to the ongoing discussion within functional linguistics...
Margaret Schlauch (1) (1898-1986)
Margaret Schlauch was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on 25th September 1898. She received her B.A. at Barnard College in 1918, her M.A. at Columbia in 1919 and her Ph.D. also at Columbia in 1927 (diss. Chaucer's Constance and Accused Queens). Before...
Medievalism and Orientalism at the World's Fairs
ABSTRACT From the middle of the nineteenth through the early twentieth centuries, the great European powers mounted enormous international exhibitions, displaying both their technological and economic power and their newly acquired colonial possessions....
Medieval Marxists: A Tradition (1)
ABSTRACT This paper presents a number of individuals from the last two centuries who, for varying reasons, have been attracted to both medieval studies and action for social change. Karl and Eleanor Marx, William Morris, and F.J. Furnivall are among...
ME -Lich(e)l-ly. (1)
ABSTRACT The aim of this paper is to look at the development of the ME -lich(e) > -ly. Although the /t[integral]/-deletion in this adjectival/adverbial suffix has been noted by scholars for a long time, as it was functioning for several centuries,...
Metathetic and Non-Metathetic Form Selection in Middle English
ABSTRACT Metathesis, a specific phonological development consisting in an alteration within the sequence of sounds in a word was usually materialised in the development of English as a shift of a prevocalic consonant to a postvocalic position or...
Modern Geolinguistic Tenets and the Diffusion of Linguistic Innovations in Late Middle English
ABSTRACT In this paper we intend to reconstruct some of the geographical aspects that may have contributed to the diffusion of linguistic innovations from London to the rest of the country in the late Middle English period. We accept the geolinguistic...
Old English Ea in Middle Kentish Place-Names
ABSTRACT This research paper intends to contribute to the study of Medieval English dialectology by focusing on Kentish, traditionally regarded as a Middle English dialect in which sounds and linguistic changes behave differently. This contribution...
Open Syllable Lengthening before /T/ and /K/ in the Language of Cursor Mundi-The Evidence from Rhyme Vowels
ABSTRACT Since Open Syllable Lengthening was a Middle English change, there is nothing particularly surprising in the fact that the results of its operation are visible in Cursor Mundi, itself a Middle English text. This paper argues, however, that...
Promises Kept and Broken-The Power of a Spoken Word in the Chivalric World of le Morte D'Arthur
ABSTRACT The article demonstrates the performative character of chivalric culture portrayed in Thomas Malory's Le Morte Darthur. I refrain, however, from the investigation of all explicit forms of theatricality, in favour of a closer and more detailed...
Pronominal Usage in Dialectal English
ABSTRACT Altogether six maps taken from The computer developed linguistic atlas of England (Viereck and Ramisch 1991, 1997) serve to demonstrate peculiarities of pronominal usage in English dialects. In the area of personal pronouns, phenomena such...
Reduplication and the Old English Strong Verbs Class VII (1)
ABSTRACT Reduplication, one of regular ways of forming the Indo-European perfect, was inherited into the early Germanic as a marker of the preterite in some strong verbs. Of all older Germanic languages, Gothic as the only one retains this formation...
Representing Rebellion: The Ending of Chaucer's Knight's Tale and the Castration of Saturn (1)
ABSTRACT Previous scholars of the Knight's Tale have expressed some difficulty when pagan Theseus, at the end, strangely attributes authority for the resolution of the dramatic conflict among Palamon, Arcite, and Emelye to the "First Mover," Jupiter,...
The Dental Suffix in Modern Icelandic: Phonology, Morpho(phono)logy, and the Lexicon (1)
ABSTRACT The Germanic dental suffix has three surface variants in Modem Icelandic. The distribution of the variants and their interaction with the consonants of the verbal base are analysed against the background of the phonology of the language....
The Elements of Anglo-Saxon Wisdom Poetry in the Exeter Book Riddles
ABSTRACT The paper investigates the parallels between the Old English wisdom poetry and a group of riddles contained in the Exeter Book. Although the riddle form in general as well as the Anglo-Saxon riddles in particular can he identified with...
The "Gender Gap" Reconsidered: Manuscripts and Readers in Late-Medieval England (1)
ABSTRACT A study of the late-medieval owners and readers of texts originally addressed to female audiences raises a multitude of questions about the relationships between text and readers and, in particular, the influence of gender on reading. The...
"Thei Stodyn upon Stoyls for to Beheldyn Hir": Margery Kempe and the Power of Performance (1)
ABSTRACT This paper analyzes Margery Kempe's behaviour as performance. I begin by cataloguing the different modes of physical and verbal theatre which Margery's text presents as evidence of her authority. I then explore the aspects of performance...
The Origin and Diffusion of English 3SG-S
ABSTRACT Verbal 3sg -s is generally attributed (in one way or another) to Norsification. Recent accounts fail to motivate both the generalization from 2sg to 2pl in the north and the restriction of-s to irregular monosyllabics in Early Modem English....
The Status of Dearr and ??Earf in Old English
ABSTRACT This article is concerned with the morphosyntactic and semantic properties of dearr and pearf, which in Old English were clearly distinct preterite-present verbs. Nothing yet foreshadowed their future merger and the Middle English replacement...
Towards a More Analytic Expression of Grammatical Relationships: The Use of Prepositions and Adverbs in Early English Correspondence
ABSTRACT The focus of my paper is syntactic. It analyses different functions and positions of uninflected words, more precisely prepositions and adverbs, in fifteenth-century English correspondence. By Late Middle English grammatical relationships...
Two Saints' Plays/conversion Plays from Bodleian Ms Digby 133
ABSTRACT Though The conversion of St. Paul and Mary Magdalene belong to the same genre and are in the same manuscript they illustrate the use of different dramaturgical devices. The former play is a processional drama being, sometimes, closely linked...
Verb Morphology of South-Western Middle Scots (1)
ABSTRACT The present paper focuses on the Middle Scots verbal inflections in the Scottish south-west, the region called Galloway. The manuscripts from the local archives are still virtually unknown to a wider public, which causes much imprecision...
Watching the Watchers: Drama Spectatorship and Counter-Surveillance in Sixteenth-Century Chester
ABSTRACT The late medieval cycle of 24 plays at Chester was begun in earnest during the fifteenth century and transformed in the sixteenth, forming a long and coherent theatrical tradition. Recent scholarship and criticism have documented the civic...
West Midland and Southwestern Adjectival Systems in Early Middle English: A Reanalysis
ABSTRACT The aim of this paper is to present the process of functional reanalysis that took place in the adjectival systems of West Midland and Southwestern dialects. The process is manifested in the interplay between case and gender marking, which...
What Every Goodwoman Wants: The Parameters of Desire in le Menagier De Paris / the Goodman of Paris
ABSTRACT Using the example of the l4th century household book Le menagier de Paris written by an old man for his teenaged wife, this essay explores how the desires of late-medieval women might have been articulated, manipulated and created by the...
Worshipping Corpus Christi: Mary Magdalene in the English Mystery Cycles
ABSTRACT The open-ended form of the Scripture and the multiplicity of apocryphal and folk traditions pertaining to the saint often make it difficult to differentiate Mary Magdalene from other Marys in the cycles. She can be identified as Mary of...
"Ye Louely Ladyes with Youre Longe Fyngres": The Silkwomen of Medieval London
ABSTRACT The silkwomen of medieval London have become a celebrated case in the history of women's work, but the surviving evidence about the status of their work and their social situation is ambiguous at best. This essay examines their famous petition...
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