Teaching History: A Journal of Methods

Professional publication covering teaching ideas for history teachers at all levels.

Articles from Vol. 37, No. 1, Spring

Making Sense of It All: The Debate as Unit Capstone
One of the challenges in teaching college-level surveys of United States history (and other basic courses as well) is the wide disparity in levels of college readiness among students. Not only do students vary in their skills of critical analysis,...
One Way to Teach History through Artifacts
It was the sixth week of the quarter at the University of Washington. The students in my undergraduate seminar on the United States in the 1950s already had written three papers: two primary-source analysis papers and a research paper of about five...
Problem-Based Learning in a College History Classroom
Introduction (1) My traditional method of teaching, in lower or upper-level courses, had been to lecture and assign textbook chapters to read to establish context for discussion of primary and secondary sources related to a topic. Students seemed...
Reconstructing the Declaration of Independence and the Committee of Five for Digital Natives
Far too often, history is taught from one, often flawed, perspective that distorts students' views of historical events. (1) A good example of this is the typical student's understandings about the creation and signing of the Declaration of Independence....
Teaching with Online Primary Sources: Documents from the National Archives: "I Still Have No Peace," an African American World War I Veteran's Letter to President Calvin Coolidge, October 16, 1923
Nearly five years after the end of World War I, African American veteran Timothy Percy Patterson wrote to President Calvin Coolidge stating, "I served Eighteen Months in the World's war. On the 11th day of Nov. 1918, on the Battlefield in France I...