Teaching History: A Journal of Methods

Professional publication covering teaching ideas for history teachers at all levels.

Articles from Vol. 33, No. 1, Spring

Encouraging Students to Read the Texts: The Jigsaw Method
"The information in the book will be on the exam" is probably the most common technique used to inspire college history students to read assigned texts. Unfortunately, this vague threat does not always encourage students to read and analyze the assignment...
Historiography as Pedagogy: Thoughts about the Messy Past and Why We Shouldn't Clean It Up
Historiography is vital to our teaching about the past and to our understanding of the present, though you would not always know as much from the practices of K-16 history educators. (1) When I began my first full-time position as a college history...
How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Survey
When I finished graduate studies with a fresh Ph.D. in hand, I set out to conquer the world of academia. (1) I counted myself among the fortunate ones. I had a full-time job, one that would enable me to give up my adjunct workload of five or more classes...
Incorporating Films into a History Classroom: A Teaching Note
While reading and writing remain at the core of the history classes that I teach, it is simply a fact of life that, as Robert Toplin and Robert Rosenstone have argued persuasively, students tend to receive most of their history through film and television....
Unshuttered Lens: Dorothea Lange, Documentary Photography, and Government Work, 1935-1945
In November 1940, on Arizona State Highway 87, south of Chandler, in Maricopa County, Dorothea Lange took a photograph of a mother and four small children. Caught in the powerful forces of the Great Depression, this migrant family's plight was used...