Ethics & International Affairs

Ethics & International Affairs is a magazine specializing in Politics topics.

Articles from Vol. 26, No. 1, Spring

A Brief Response to Michael Ignatieff
In his elegant essay on the tension between a singular global ethic and global ethics in the plural, Michael Ignatieff invites us to "think harder about the conflicts of principle between them." (1) He is certainly right that harder thinking is needed:...
After the MDGs: Citizen Deliberation and the Post-2015 Development Framework
For those concerned with and affected by global development and human deprivation 2015 looms large, for this is the date by which the ambitious Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the world's biggest promise, are to be achieved. As such, it will be...
A Global Ethic and the Hybrid Character of the Moral World
In the lead essay of this symposium, Michael Ignatieff offers a characteristic blend of philosophical acuteness and political good sense on a topic that, we can all agree, is central to many of the most important questions on the contemporary political...
Almost Saving Whales: The Ambiguity of Success at the International Whaling Commission
The international regulation of whaling has been a tremendous success. It has reduced whale hunting dramatically from its peak in the 1960s and brought almost all species of whales out of danger of extinction. Today, whaling conservation stands as...
Editors' Note
The Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs will turn one hundred years old in February 2014. Andrew Carnegie founded the Council in 1914 with a specific purpose in mind: he thought it was possible to avoid the Great War that he and many...
In Defense of Smart Sanctions: A Response to Joy Gordon
In her recent article in this journal, Joy Gordon provides an astute history and critique of the evolution and application of smart sanctions within the United Nations system since the mid-1990. (1) Her analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the...
Introduction
Within a short period the International Criminal Court (ICC) has become central to world politics. The dramatic diplomatic process that produced the Rome Statute in 1998 was followed by an unexpectedly rapid succession of state ratifications and the...
Local Priorities, Universal Priorities, and Enabling Harm
"National communities," Michael Ignatieff writes in his thoughtful essay on the prospects for a global ethic, "have some good reasons, as well as some not so good ones, to privilege local ahead of universal priorities and interests." (1) And he goes...
Reimagining a Global Ethic
"Reimagining a global ethic" is ,a project worthy of Andrew Carnegie and of the Carnegie Council s upcoming commemoration of his founding gift in 1914. (1) As a collaborative research project stretching forward over the next three years, it ought to...
The Dialogue of Global Ethics
The message of Michael Ignatieffs reflections on reimagining a global ethic is a comforting one for political philosophers. (1) It is vital, he writes, for philosophers to keep doing what they have been doing: addressing the injustices of globalization...
The ICC's Potential for Doing Bad When Pursuing Good
The International Criminal Court (ICC) seeks to end impunity for the atrocity crimes of genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and, eventually, crimes of aggression. My contribution to this discussion takes a consequentialist view to outline...
The International Criminal Court's Provisional Authority to Coerce
The United Nations ad hoc tribunals in the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda had primacy over national judicial agents for crimes committed in these countries during the most notorious civil wars and genocide of the 1990s. The UN Charter granted the Security...
Toward a Global Ethic
We are one humanity, but seven billion humans. This is the essential challenge of global ethics: how to accommodate the tension between our universal and particular natures. This tension is, of course, age-old and runs through all moral and political...
Why the ICC Should Operate within Peace Processes
Is it ethical for the prosecutor at the International Criminal Court (ICC) to consider political factors, such as peace processes, in selecting situations to investigate or cases to prosecute? During the early years of the court, a number of documents...
Why the International Criminal Court Must Pretend to Ignore Politics
Since the International Criminal Court (ICC) prosecutes crimes of mass violence that are inherently political in nature, its actions will inevitably have political consequences about which the prosecutor and judges should be as well informed as possible....