Ethics & International Affairs

Ethics & International Affairs is a magazine specializing in Politics topics.

Articles from Vol. 20, No. 4, December

And Now from the Green Zone ... Reflections on the Iraq Tribunal's Dujail Trial
The Iraq tribunal is an odd creature. (1) It is an Iraqi-led mechanism designed and supported by foreigners. It is based on international law but relies heavily on Iraqi legal tradition and procedures. And it is a postconflict initiative in the midst...
Counterfactuals and the Proportionality Criterion
In order for a resort to war or military force to be morally justified, it is widely held that in addition to there being a just cause, the good achieved by the war must be proportionate to the harm caused. As I write this, the importance of the proportionality...
Judicial Globalization in the Service of Self-Government
For at least the past several decades, judges around the world have been looking beyond their own states' jurisprudence to international law and the decisions of foreign courts in order to apply domestic law. This widespread practice is part of a phenomenon...
Killing Soldiers
A riddle in the ethics of war concerns whether lethal defensive force may be justifiably used against aggressing soldiers who are morally innocent. In this essay I argue that although there might be reasons for excusing soldiers as individuals, one...
Saddam Hussein's Trial Meets the "Fairness" Test
War crimes trials are often controversial, and few such trials in history have been more so than that of Saddam Hussein, the former president of Iraq. In this trial, controversy has raged over the very nature of war crimes justice, the relevance or...
The J Curve: A New Way to Understand Why Nations Rise and Fall
The J Curve: A New Way to Understand Why Nations Rise and Fall, Ian Bremmer (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2006), 320 pp., $26 cloth. Things get worse before they get better. Economists noticed that a country's trade deficit follows this pattern...
The Legitimacy of Global Governance Institutions
"Legitimacy" has both a normative and a sociological meaning. To say that an institution is legitimate in the normative sense is to assert that it has the right to rule--where ruling includes promulgating rules and attempting to secure compliance with...