The Science Teacher

The monthly magazine of the National Science Teachers Association. Articles cover innovations in science and science teaching methods.

Articles from Vol. 76, No. 8, November

Acoustic Tweezers
Manipulating tiny objects, such as single cells or nanosized beads, often requires relatively large, unwieldy equipment, but now a system has been developed that uses tiny tweezers small enough to place on a chip, according to Pennsylvania State University...
A New Twist on "Mystery Boxes": An Activity to Help Students Learn about Observation, Interpretation, and Argumentation
In textbooks, much is said about the role of experimentation in science--but there is less about observation, and often little to nothing about inference or argumentation. The goal of science is not merely to describe an object or phenomenon, but to...
Argument-Driven Inquiry: A Way to Promote Learning during Laboratory Activities
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] In America's Lab Report: Investigations in High School Science (2005), the National Research Council (NRC) makes several suggestions for how laboratory activities can be changed to improve students' skills and understanding...
Bat Love Songs
Love songs are not only for soft rock stations--they are also used by romantic bats. Researchers at Texas A&M University and The University of Texas at Austin are believed to be the first to decode the mysterious love sounds made by the winged...
Chemical Bonds
Chemical Bonds By Phillip Manning $35. Chelsea House Publishers. New York. 2009. ISBN: 0791097404. [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The author of this book quotes Linus Pauling: "An understanding of the electronic structure of atoms is necessary...
Data, Data Everywhere
We are awash in tables, charts, and graphs. Newspapers display data in every section--from economic information to sports statistics to weather reports. Even the entertainment section features data on television and movie viewing. Using empirical data...
Elk Habitat: A Case Study of Scientific Inquiry: Determining the Cause of Shortened Life Span in Yellowstone National Park
A case study is an excellent way to help students think like scientists as they work to solve a dilemma. With case studies, students are presented small bits of information through structured or guided inquiry, much the same way that scientific research...
Examining Student Work: Evidence-Based Learning for Students and Teachers
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Across the nation, teachers gather regularly to examine student work and uncover how their students are thinking about science. These teacher groups aim to improve both their instructional methods and the effect these methods...
Extra! Extra! Read All about the Universe!
This year we are celebrating the International Year of Astronomy (IYA). The IYA commemorates the 400th anniversary of Galileo's first observations of the cosmos through a telescope. He never could have imagined how our view of the universe would continue...
Facial Attractiveness
When it comes to potential mates, women may be as complicated as men claim they are, according to psychologists. "We have found that women evaluate facial attractiveness on two levels--a sexual level, based on specific facial features like the jawbone,...
Health Wise: Helping Students Make Healthy Choices
Q Many students have recently asked about the "swine flu." How is it different than the seasonal flu, what are the symptoms, and what can we do to avoid it? A Flu season has come early this year. Each year, about 5-20% of people in the United States...
Multiple Solution Methods for Teaching Science in the Classroom
Multiple Solution Methods for Teaching Science in the Classroom By Stephen DeMeo $29.95. Universal Publishers. Boca Raton, FL. 2008. ISBN: 1599429888. [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] This book is grounded in the language and presentation of...
New Technology Cuts Odors
A North Carolina State University (NC State) researcher has devised a new technology that really does not stink. In fact, it could be the key to eliminating foul odors and air pollutants emitted by industrial chicken rendering facilities and--ultimately--large-scale...
Petrified Paper ... Adapted from Rocks & Minerals #23
by TOPS Learning Systems [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] 1. Mix a level tablespoon of Epsom salts (magnesium sulfate) with 2 tablespoons water on a plate. [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] 2. Fold a paper towel into quarters and roll it into a "log." Lay it...
Secondhand Smoke
A team of scientists at the University of California, Riverside, has found that even secondhand tobacco smoke exposure can result in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a common disease and rising cause of chronic liver injury in which fat accumulates...
Seven Steps to Teaching with Inquiry
Step 1: Admit you have a problem. You claim to believe in inquiry, which allows students to understand the diverse ways that scientists study the natural world, and teaching that is based on the constructivist theory of learning--but you lecture. For...
Sun Safety: The Stats
According to the Health Physics Society (HPS) and the American Cancer Society (ACS), one in five persons will be diagnosed with skin cancer during their lifetime. Each year, more than one million new basal cell or squamous cell skin cancers are diagnosed...
The Art of Teaching Science
The Art of Teaching Science By Jack Hassard $64.95. RoutledgeFalmer. New York. 2008. ISBN: 0415965284. [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] This book does not belong on a shelf; it belongs in the hands of every science teacher. Based on the...
The Blind May Still "See"
Except in clumsy moments, we rarely knock over the box of cereal or glass of orange juice as we reach for our morning cup of coffee. New research at The University of Western Ontario has helped unlock the mystery of how our brain allows us to avoid...
The Invention of Air
The Invention of Air By Steven Johnson $25.95. Penguin. New York, NY. 2008. ISBN: 1594488525. [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The Invention of Air is more than the story of Joseph Priestly; it is also a story of science. Not since James D....
The Sound of Crickets: Using Evidence-Based Reasoning to Measure Temperature Using Cricket Chirps
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Open the door, let them out. --Nobel Laureate Freeman Dyson, advice to a young science teacher All too often our science classes take place entirely behind classroom walls, with few opportunities for students to directly...
Urologist. (Career of the Month: Based on Interviews with Professionals Using Science in the Workplace
The organs, tubes, muscles, and nerves that work together to create, store, and carry urine make up the urinary system. Urologists are surgeons that focus on diseases of this system--which includes the kidneys, ureters, bladder, supporting muscles...
Where's the Evidence?
"What evidence do you have for that idea?" It is a simple question, but one asked far less than it should be. Too often, we hear justifications such as, "Everybody knows that... ," "It's what I've heard," or "It's just what I believe." Formulating...
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.