Science and Children

Founded in September 1963, Science and Children is a peer-reviewed journal for elementary school teachers published by the Nationial Science Teachers Association of Arlington, Va. Its subjects include education and science (general).

Articles from Vol. 46, No. 5, January

An O-"Fish"-Ial Research Project: Students Develop Reading, Writing, Research, and Presentation Skills in This Creative Study of Local Marine Life
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] I love fishing and often share stories of my marine adventures with my third-grade students. They are always an appreciative audience, peppering me with questions about fish, their diets and habitats, and even what they look...
A Picture Is Worth a Thousand Words: Using Digital Cameras Captivates Second-Grade Learners at the Zoo
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Lions, tigers, and bears, oh my! Digital cameras, young inquisitive scientists, give it a try! Many elementary schools take field trips to the zoo to learn about animals, and mine was no exception. However, I often felt like...
Communicating with Pictures and Precision
From the earliest civilizations, humans have used drawings and pictures as a form of communication and to convey information--whether it was the seasons or location of good hunting grounds. In this month's column, simple alphabet picture books show...
ELLs and the Language of School Science
"I have five English language learners in my class, at various levels of learning English. Should I hold off teaching them science until they are more proficient in English?" What challenges do English language learners face while learning science?...
Enhancing Science for ELLs: Science Strategies for English Language Learners That Benefit All Students
Most of us recall the first time we had English Language Learners (ELLs) in our classrooms. What does this child understand? How do I help her feel comfortable when I can't communicate in the same language? How do I teach academic subjects and monitor...
First-Grade Record Keepers: Young Students Observe the Development of Salamander Larvae to Learn about Life Cycles and Scientists
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Developing good record-keeping habits is essential for organizing, processing, and communicating experimental results objectively. We came up with an interactive method of teaching first graders to record, organize, and interpret...
Giant Roaming Deep-Sea Protist
Groovelike tracks on the ocean floor made by giant deep-sea single-celled organisms could lead to new insights into the evolutionary origin of animals, says biologist Mikhail Matz from The University of Texas at Austin. Matz and his colleagues recently...
Just like Real Scientists: Famous Primatologist Jane Goodall and Her Modern Counterpart Ian Gilby Inspired Third Graders to Conduct Their Own Animal Behavior Study-Of Their Pets-And Keep Records as Scientists Do
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] How do you inspire students to keep records like scientists? Share the primary research of real scientists and explicitly teach students to how to keep records--that's how! I worked with a group of third-grade students and...
Organizing Weather Data
Displays of data do more than help us look for patterns and draw conclusions. They provide opportunities to share our thinking with other investigators and to communicate our results to an audience. Organizing data, however, is a challenge. Giving...
Practitioner Research Success! an Inside Look at Using Classroom Research to Inform and Improve Teaching
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] It's hard to imagine becoming a classroom research aficionado, but with the success of our practitioner research experiences it just might happen! What began in a science education graduate course has turned into an inspirational...
Process Skills Practice and Standardized Tests: Teaching Specific Science-Process Skills Can Help Students Learn to Accurately Interpret Science Test Questions
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Faced with the prospect of giving fifth graders a state science test, teachers often review previous grade-level science content or use test-review booklets as a method of preparation. While this may allow students to understand...
Q: How Does a Scientific Theory Become a Scientific Law?
A: A theory doesn't become a law. End of story, end of this issue of Science 101. Just kidding--it's all about the how and why, and that hasn't been answered. I'd like to step back a bit and address a common misconception that unfortunately permeates...
Record Keeping in Science
I am constantly on a diet. Sound familiar? One of the usual diet tips found in many diet plans is "keep a log of everything you eat." Keep a record? Why is this such a useful diet tip? First, there is accountability. If you write it, you can't ignore...
Solar-Powered Sea Slugs
The lowly sea slug Elysia chlorotica may not seem like the most exciting of creatures, but don't be fooled: it behaves like a plant and is solar-powered, says Texas A&M University biologist James Manhart, who has been studying these tiny creatures...
The Ocean's Growing Acidity
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] University of Chicago scientists have documented that the ocean is growing more acidic faster than previously thought. In addition, they have found that the increasing acidity correlates with increasing levels of atmospheric...
What Sort of Feather?
Birds are interesting to children, and knowing they are the descendants of dinosaurs makes them even more intriguing. Like dinosaurs, they are fascinatingly strange but cuddlier (think Big Bird). And being able to fly puts them in the Most Envied Ability...