Science Scope

Magazine for middle and junior high science teachers, containing teaching tips, instructional reviews, detailed laboratory procedures, posters, professional updates, and association news.

Articles from November

Can You Identify Our Mystery Photo?
How to submit a guess Can you pin down the identity of this month's Mystery Photo subject? In each issue of Science Scope, we will publish a science-related image for your students to identify. When an image is published, teachers can submit...
Catapulting into Technological Design
Byline: Kristen Hammes One of my favorite projects for exploring levers is to have students design and build a working catapult. The catapult is designed at home and built from scratch during class. Each catapult is tested for accuracy and students...
Classroom Benefit of Being Bionic!
Byline: Inez Fugate Liftig "Technology as design is included in the Standards as parallel to science as inquiry." -National Science Education Standards (NRC 1996, p. 24) It is often said, and in most cases it is true, that students are much...
Eclipse Cycles
Byline: Bob Riddle The Moon's orbit around the Sun with the Earth brings it into position twice each month for an eclipse at new Moon and at full Moon. However, we do not have an eclipse pair each month, nor do we have an eclipse every two weeks....
Engineering-A-Future for Tomorrow's Young Women
Byline: Susan Gore Engineering-A-Future (EAF) is an outreach program for middle school age girls. Through a collaborative effort of the Colleges of Engineering and Education at Tennessee Tech University (TTU), the participants experience hands-on...
Engineering in the Classroom
Byline: Kathleen Matthew and Stacy Wilson When asked, "What does an engineer do?" students usually answer, "It's the guy who drives the train." Statistically speaking, students do have the "guy" part correct, but engineers do more than drive the...
Get a Grip!
Byline: Suzanne A. Olds, Deborah A. Harrell, and Michael E. Valente Investigating the field of engineering offers the opportunity for interdisciplinary, hands-on, inquiry-based units that integrate real-world applications; yet, many K-12 students...
Nanomedicine
Byline: Melissa A. Hemling, Lauren M. Sammel, Greta Zenner, Amy C. Payne, and Wendy C. Crone Many traditional classroom science and technology activities often ask students to complete prepackaged labs that ensure that everyone arrives at the same...
No Child Left Behind
Byline: Carla C. Johnson and Nikki Hanegan The No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 is the historic education reform effort that President Bush proposed his first week in office and that Congress passed into law on January 8, 2002. NCLB reauthorized...
Paper Towers
Byline: James Minogue and Todd Guentensberger In working with a group of undergraduate education majors during a science teaching methods course, I asked a seemingly simple question: What do you think the National Science Education Standards are...
Repairing Femoral Fractures
Byline: Jarred Sakakeeny Photographs courtesy of the author Biomaterial science is a rapidly growing field that has scientists and doctors searching for new ways to repair the body. A merger between medicine and engineering, biomaterials can...
The CSI Effect
Byline: Richard Jones and Arthur Bangert As a science teacher, I am sure that if you were asked to draw a scientist today you would not revert back to the same image that you had in your mind's eye during your middle school years. What would your...
The Science of Star Wars: Integrating Technology and the Benchmarks for Science Literacy
Byline: Stephanie Thompson Star Wars: The name alone implies action, adventure, the vastness of space, alien creatures, and of course, who can forget light sabers? The Star Wars saga has entertained millions of people around the world for years,...
Thinking about Students' Questions
Byline: Jaclyn Turner Asking questions is a vital component in any classroom, but it is absolutely essential in a science classroom. As a science teacher, I know questioning plays a major role in the inquiry process and, in turn, students' learning....
Waste Not, Want Not
Byline: Ken Roy Your school district legally owns hazardous laboratory chemicals from cradle (point of purchase) to grave (final resting place). This means that should a science teacher incorrectly dispose of hazardous laboratory chemicals, there...