Alcohol Research

Journal covering alcohol research.

Articles from Vol. 27, No. 4, 2003

Alcohol, Oxidative Stress, and Free Radical Damage
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are small, highly reactive, oxygen-containing molecules that are naturally generated in small amounts during the body's metabolic reactions and can react with and damage complex cellular molecules such as fats, proteins,...
Animal Models of Alcoholic Liver Disease-Focus on the Intragastric Feeding Model
The use of animal models has contributed to greater understanding of how alcoholic liver disease (ALD) develops, and of how the severity of liver injury is influenced by factors other than alcohol, such as nutrition, oxygen deprivation (as occurs with...
Cytokines-Central Factors in Alcoholic Liver Disease
Many processes related to the consumption or breakdown of alcohol that contribute to alcohol-induced liver disease are mediated by small proteins known as cytokines, which are produced and secreted by liver cells and many other cells throughout the body....
Dangerous Byproducts of Alcohol Breakdown-Focus on Adducts
Alcohol breakdown in the liver results in the generation of the reactive molecule acetaldehyde and, as a byproduct, highly reactive oxygen-containing molecules known as oxygen radicals. Both acetaldehyde and oxygen radicals can interact with proteins...
Endotoxin and Kupffer Cell Activation in Alcoholic Liver Disease
One central component in the complex network of processes leading to the development of alcoholic liver disease is the activation of immune cells residing in the liver (i.e., Kupffer cells) by a substance called endotoxin, which is released by bacteria...
Energy Availability and Alcohol-Related Liver Pathology
Alcohol consumption alters the metabolism of the most common type of cell found in the liver, the hepatocyte. The presence of alcohol in the body causes the liver to use more oxygen-for example, when breaking down the alcohol. Increased oxygen use, in...
Intracellular Proteolytic Systems in Alcohol-Induced Tissue Injury
The body constantly produces proteins and degrades proteins that are no longer needed or are defective. The process of protein breakdown, called proteolysis, is essential to cell survival. Numerous proteolytic systems exist in mammalian cells, the most...
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