Education Next

A quarterly scholarly journal of the Hoover Institution that explores issues relating to education policy and K-12 education reform in the United States.

Articles from Vol. 5, No. 4, Fall

An Education Mayor Takes Charge: The Picture in New York
In one of the more extreme examples of ancient wisdom proved true, many education reformers are wondering if they should have been more careful about what they wished for in New York City. Please let the mayor run the schools: that was the mantra....
A Tribute to John Walton
At the edge of a fault line between two tectonic plates, the Grand Teton towers some five thousand feet over Jackson Hole below. There, near his beloved family home, John Walton, a risk-taker of the kind seldom witnessed within the world of large-scale...
Broken on the Court: When the All-Boy Band Visited the All-Girl School
Two worlds collided today. Fortunately, only a stereotype broke during the impact. I teach at the only all-girl middle school in Oakland, California, Julia Morgan School for Girls. And today, during Monday morning assembly, the girls listened to the...
Libertarian Liberals: When the Left Was (Sometimes) Right
The revolution--the one foretold in so many platforms, political speeches, and books of the 1960s and early 1970s--didn't really happen. Of course things changed, but not exactly as promised. Though several important social and intellectual trends...
Looking in the Wrong Place: The Flaw in the New Federal Charter School Study
As the proverbial story goes, a drunk, when asked where he had lost his keys, pointed off in the darkness, far from the lamppost under which he was searching. "But the light's better here," he explained. So it is with the new federal study of charter...
Making Up the Rules as You Play the Game: A Conflict of Interest at the Very Heart of NCLB
Chicago's school district wants the federal afterschool dollar. So do many other districts. And more than two thousand private providers, for-profit and nonprofit alike, are making their own claims. More than $2.5 billion is at stake, a figure scheduled...
NEA Sues over NCLB: The Bucks Are Big, but the Case Is Weak
Last April, in a move that generated many headlines but surprised almost no one, the National Education Association (NEA) and nine school districts filed a lawsuit against Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings, claiming that federal funding to...
Private Schools for the Poor: Education Where No One Expects It
The accepted wisdom is that private schools serve the privileged; everyone else, especially the poor, requires public school. The poor, so this logic goes, need government assistance if they are to get a good education, which helps explain why, in...
Pseudo-Science and a Sound Basic Education: Voodoo Statistics in New York
Checked: "The New York Adequacy Study: Determining the Cost of Providing All Children in New York an Adequate Education," American Institutes for Research and Management Analysis and Planning (March 2004). "Resource Adequacy Study for the New...
The New Philanthropists: Can Their Millions Enhance Learning?
Last February, in a speech in Washington, D.C. that drew 45 of the nation's governors as well as a hefty sample of the nation's education policy elite, Microsoft chairman Bill Gates issued a jeremiad on the state of the American high school, arguing...
The Truths about Charter Schools: New Research from Chicago and North Carolina
With charter schools now serving approximately one million students nationwide, policymakers have been awaiting rigorous evaluations of their effects on student learning. The following articles help fill the gap. Caroline Hoxby and Jonah Rockoff present...
Unflagged and Unequal
When the College Board stopped flagging the SAT scores of students who took the tests with accommodations (most commonly, extended time) in 2004, it instituted a tightened eligibility process to offset the new stigma-free advantage. In his examination...
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