Contemporary Review

Founded in 1866, Contemporary Review is a scholarly journal published quarterly. Contemporary Review Company Ltd. owns and publishes this journal, and its editorial headquarters is in Oxford, United Kingdom.Contemporary Review covers a number of topics, including politics, international affairs, literature, art and art history. Its region and its audience are international. Dr. Richard Mullen is the editor; Dr. Alex Kerr is the managing editor; Dr. James Munson is the literary editor; and Anselma Bruce is the associate editor. James LoGerfo, Robin Findlay and Charles Foster are the editorial advisers.

Articles from Vol. 278, No. 1624, May

African-American Studies: An African Scholar's View
IMAGES of African Americans dominate every facet of life not only in the United States but increasingly in the entire world. Think of the stature of the Rev Martin Luther King, 1964 Nobel Peace Laureate, now an American national hero with the full...
Coleridge's Ancestral Voices
WE all know now that Samuel Taylor Coleridge's poem Kubla Khan is a masterpiece. But how do we know this? And has it always been known? Kubla Khan was first published in 1816 in a booklet that also contained Christabel and The Pains of Sleep. Looking...
German Romantic Painting from Berlin
TWO years have passed since the imaginative and scholarly exhibitions of the portraits of Ingres and the self-portraits of Rembrandt were mounted in the Sainshury Wing of the National Gallery. One has waited in vain for a comparable exhibition there,...
Islam and the West: From Discord to Understanding
THE spread of Islam has had an impact on the globalisation of culture. Islam has spread not only as a religion but has also helped to give birth to languages which are spoken by many more non-Muslims than Muslims. Kiswahili in Africa is today the most...
Mathematics, Physics and the Real Face of God
To see something 'with your own eyes' is for most of us the greatest certainty we can have in life. Yet the category of knowledge we call science has proved time and again that our senses as a source of knowing are primitive and unreliable. Were...
Peacocks in Somerset
THE setting of this sketch is a cottage garden on the edge of a Somerset village. The time is a warm, sunny afternoon in October 1999. Along one side of the garden runs a large bank of nasturtiums, well past their flowering best. As I stood, wondering...
The European Union and North Africa
THE European Union, as it develops internally, and externally through enlargement, has constantly to keep under review its relations with the rest of the world. It was clear, from its inception that, unless its members were to make an uncharacteristic...
The Veneration of Icons
IT is always disciples who ruin things. They generally ruin things by being insufficiently respectful of their masters' teachings. And they always do this by trying to be tremendously reverential - by trying to enshrine the master's name by exaggerating...
The World of Paperbacks
VINTAGE have been bringing out a large number of literary titles. There are three more in their collection of Graham Greene's novels. The first is Stamboul Train ([pound]6.99. 216 pages), first published in 1932 and although his fourth novel, the one...