Contemporary Review

Founded in 1866, Contemporary Review is a scholarly journal published quarterly. Contemporary Review Company Ltd. owns and publishes this journal, and its editorial headquarters is in Oxford, United Kingdom.Contemporary Review covers a number of topics, including politics, international affairs, literature, art and art history. Its region and its audience are international. Dr. Richard Mullen is the editor; Dr. Alex Kerr is the managing editor; Dr. James Munson is the literary editor; and Anselma Bruce is the associate editor. James LoGerfo, Robin Findlay and Charles Foster are the editorial advisers.

Articles from Vol. 278, No. 1622, March

America's National Park Service
POLITICIANS, particularly at the national level, are increasingly viewed with disdain by a significant percentage of the American public. Ordinary men and women are wearied and disgusted by their political representatives. They feel powerless before,...
Anxious Anatomists of Blair's Britain
THE days when Tony Blair was Britain's darling, basking in endlessly flattering opinion polls, have begun to seem like some episode of mass hallucination. Against a background of mounting public cynicism about politicians as a breed, the New Labour...
Clearing Land Mines
SINCE 1939 there has been conflict of one kind or another in no less than sixty-eight countries. Every one, war, civil war or terrorist campaign, eventually comes to an end, but it leaves many kinds of dangerous debris in its wake. This is then a serious,...
East Timor: On the Road to Independence
EAST Timor will become the 190th member of the United Nations when it achieves independence sometime this year. It is currently governed by the United Nations Transitional Administration in East Timor (UNTAET) and there is a Cabinet of the Transitional...
Hebron: An Average Day in the Graveyard of Innocence
Editor's Note: Charles Foster is a freelance writer with experience in a number of theatres of war including South Lebanon, Bosnia and the West Bank. In December 2000 he went back to Hebron, one of the most volatile towns in the West Bank. IT is...
Malcolm Bradbury: A History Man for Our Times
THE death last November of the academic and author Malcolm Bradbury from a rare form of pneumonia has robbed British Literature of a generous and expansive voice which had much to say over the last forty years. Bradbury rose to the top of an establishment...
The Black Sea: Economic Developments and Environmental Dangers
SHIPPING across the crowded Black Sea should expand substantially this year. Export volumes may well show quite dramatic growth under the dual stimulus of the reopening of the Danube waterway in the West in a few months' time and the aggressive policy...
The Georgian Poets in Dymock
IN the cool stone nave of St. Mary's Church in the remote north-west Gloucestershire village of Dymock, there hang, as banners do in other churches up and down the land, a series of large, hinged, glass frames, projecting in a bunch from the wall....
The Quietude of the Painter Dou
THIS winter the largest-ever collection of the paintings of Gerrit Dou, consummate in all their tiny magic, travelled to Washington, Dulwich and The Hague from as far afield as Stockholm and St Petersburg. Dou's pictures have wandered much further...
The Russian Approach to Human Rights Intervention
THE end of the Cold War and the emergence of the United States as the only superpower raised several questions concerning the direction of the country's foreign policy. There is an assumption, at least among some representatives of the American elite,...