Contemporary Review

Founded in 1866, Contemporary Review is a scholarly journal published quarterly. Contemporary Review Company Ltd. owns and publishes this journal, and its editorial headquarters is in Oxford, United Kingdom.Contemporary Review covers a number of topics, including politics, international affairs, literature, art and art history. Its region and its audience are international. Dr. Richard Mullen is the editor; Dr. Alex Kerr is the managing editor; Dr. James Munson is the literary editor; and Anselma Bruce is the associate editor. James LoGerfo, Robin Findlay and Charles Foster are the editorial advisers.

Articles from Vol. 264, No. 1538, March

A New Fuel in the Middle East
THE prospect of substantial natural gas discoveries around the Red Sea is about to bring together the governments of the area -- some of them hostile neighbours -- in a co-ordinated effort to safeguard their common environment. They are drafting a new...
A Northern Paradox: How Finland Survived the Cold War
AFTER the event the debates and the soul-searching begin in earnest. This is the situation in many countries now that the sharp division of Europe into Soviet and Western spheres is receding into the past. There is a strong urge to assess, to re-assess...
Arthur Miller's 'Last Yankee' - a Male Depressive
ARTHUR Miller's latest play, The Last Yankee at the Duke of York in London, has been dubbed as his 'best play of the decade'. And that was no exaggeration. The Last Yankee is about the often ignored illness, depression. The setting is in a State mental...
Culture in Crisis in Prague
THE aura of romance which hovers around the new Czech Republic, and especially its beautiful capital, has not yet lost its pulling power for Westerners. At least, if it has lost its appeal for those for whom it had snob value during the communist period,...
Memories of Walter De la Mare
OTHERWISE cultured people often fight shy of poetry and although they will look at paintings or listen to music, it is difficult to get them to open a book of poems. Furthermore, a young would-be poet can often be a slight embarrassment to his elders...
Pierre Duhem: Historian of the Christian Origin of Science
IT is still possible to find histories of science that describe the achievements of the ancient Greeks and then pass immediately to the Renaissance, with perhaps a brief remark about the absence of any developments worth mentioning in the intervening...
Rare Masterpieces from a Hidden Collection
ONE of the greatest art collections in the world went on show for the first -- and only -- time in Europe recently at the Music d'Orsay in Paris. The exhibition, entitled From Cezanne to Matisse: Masterpieces from the Barnes Foundation, comprised seventy-two...
The Dichotomy That Is Israel
THE first time I visited Israel was shortly after the end of the Six-Day War. My host, proud of the victory, took me to the Golan Heights. I noticed, with admiration, the difference between the land that had once been Syrian and the land that continued...
The Meaningless Artistry of Carl Faberge
WHEN Russia was still repressively Communist it required special dispensation to visit a locked room in the Hermitage Museum. Concealed there were treasures from an extravagant past considered unacceptably decadent. I recall particularly Catherine the...
Why the Most Famous Welsh Poet Writes in English
TO a poet, words are volunteers. R. S. Thomas has said that he writes to satisfy 'my own personal quest for enlightenment. I work out in a poem my way towards the truth', ('Language, Exile, a Writer and the Future', talk given by R. S. Thomas to the...