Contemporary Review

Founded in 1866, Contemporary Review is a scholarly journal published quarterly. Contemporary Review Company Ltd. owns and publishes this journal, and its editorial headquarters is in Oxford, United Kingdom.Contemporary Review covers a number of topics, including politics, international affairs, literature, art and art history. Its region and its audience are international. Dr. Richard Mullen is the editor; Dr. Alex Kerr is the managing editor; Dr. James Munson is the literary editor; and Anselma Bruce is the associate editor. James LoGerfo, Robin Findlay and Charles Foster are the editorial advisers.

Articles from Vol. 292, No. 1697, Summer

Arctic Politics Are Getting Warmer: A New Scramble for Territory?
IS the Arctic heading for a new era? A by-product of the speculation over climate change has been the suggestion that global warming will enable greater access to the Arctic's considerable resources. This could trigger a new scramble for territory,...
British Politics after the Election
THE most extraordinary British General Election since at least 1945 has resulted in the most extraordinary British government of modern times. The election's results grew increasingly unpredictable as it developed and those results outstripped the...
Disillusioned Central Europe Tilts to the Far-Right
THE savage recession still blighting the economic landscape of Central Europe has stirred up troubling memories of the Second World War, dominating landmark elections in Austria and neighbouring Hungary, the political trend-setters of this region....
Drawings by Michelangelo at the Courtauld Gallery
THE Courtauld Institute at Somerset House in the Strand, London, contains the art gallery of the University of London, and in recent years has made a name for its small exhibitions in which some of the best known works are displayed with related and...
Encountering Caroline Ashley, an Oxford Poet
'CAROLINE Ashley's poems build a mythology which beguiles immediately with an apparent innocence. But behind that innocence there is a troubling, serious world whose images, once they have got under your skin, do not leave you. The poems work like...
Implicit Religion
IT was pushing towards closing time in 'The Jolly Farmer' in Guildford and some of the drinkers were starting to become philosophical. I can't remember the rest of the conversation but the remark of one middle-aged man to his friend sticks in my memory:...
Pakistan and Its Problems
PAKISTAN cannot be ignored by the rest of the world for two main reasons. It has the sixth biggest population in the world, which was recorded as 173 million in July 2008 and is estimated at over 180 million now. The United Nations Population Division...
The Decline of British Political Leadership?
THE post-1945 cult of mediocrity has involved the undervaluing or ignoring of many aspects of Britain's achievements in the nineteenth century and one archetypically Victorian phenomenon that historians, the trustees of the collective memory, have...
The Dutch Commission's Report on the Iraq War
THE long-awaited presentation of the Davids Commission Report [1] on the legality of Dutch support for the Iraqi War and the first reaction of Prime Minister Jan Peter Balkenende caused uproar in the Netherlands. The main conclusions of the report...
The Egyptian Letters of Lucie Duff Gordon
LUCIE Duff Gordon was a very good letter writer. She was intelligent, well educated - at a time when education meant more than mastery of curriculum - open minded and advanced in her views. She was also consumptive. Her illness separated her in middle...
The Korean War at 60 Part One: Origins and Outbreak
TO write of 'The Korean war at 60' is to imply that it is still alive and going strong. This is unfortunately the case. It is alive, and if not exactly kicking, and not as strong as it was prior to the armistice of 1953, it nevertheless remains an...
The World of Paperbacks
Pride of place among this issue's paperbacks goes to two new titles from THAMES & HUDSON. Julian Bell's Mirror of the World: A New History of Art ([pounds sterling]16.95) was first published in 2007 to considerable applause. Unusual in its approach,...
Walter Pater and Neville Cardus
A few years ago I felt a faint wary wish to read Pater again. He will teach me many things. On my way to the bookcase, I learn - not just from a book - much more about cognitive dissonance, the attempt to hold two contrasting (or conflicting) emotions....