Contemporary Review

Founded in 1866, Contemporary Review is a scholarly journal published quarterly. Contemporary Review Company Ltd. owns and publishes this journal, and its editorial headquarters is in Oxford, United Kingdom.Contemporary Review covers a number of topics, including politics, international affairs, literature, art and art history. Its region and its audience are international. Dr. Richard Mullen is the editor; Dr. Alex Kerr is the managing editor; Dr. James Munson is the literary editor; and Anselma Bruce is the associate editor. James LoGerfo, Robin Findlay and Charles Foster are the editorial advisers.

Articles from Vol. 262, No. 1526, March

A Failure of Leadership
I do not remember a time when there appeared to be such a failure of political leadership not only in Government but also in Opposition. Mr. Major had barely started his post-election honeymoon when a whole host of skeletons fell out of cupboards, ghosts...
Algeria: Democracy 'On Hold.'
1992 was, politically, a turbulent year for Algeria. In January, the transition to democracy instituted by President Chadli Benjedid in 1988 was abruptly halted by the military and Chadli himself deposed: in June, Mohammed Boudiaf, Chadli's successor...
Black and White in American Politics
DESPITE gains made since the passage of the Civil Rights Act, America still remains racially polarized. Successful manipulation of the race division has for the most part accounted for the recent Republican control of the White House. The Democrats are...
Defence Cuts: Too Far Too Fast?
'SINCE 1991 there have been a number of developments which have added significantly to the commitments that the Army is required to meet at the same time as it is in the process of reorganising ... I am therefore announcing today measures which, together...
Home to Poland
DRIVING past the sign proclaiming IWONICZ-ZDROJ, the spa in the Carpathian Mountains in south eastern Poland, I was visited by a mixture of curiosity and dread. Iwonicz -- the seat of the House of Zaluski since 1799, when my great-great-great grandfather...
Pedigrees
WHEN he was Secretary of the British Museum, Arundell Esdaile once remarked to me that half his readers under the dome were American Doctors of Philosophy devising pedigrees for their wealthy countrymen. He may have humourously exaggerated the percentage,...
Syria: A Tale of Two Ironies
IN the cafes on the boulevards of Damascus and Aleppo there is a self-satisfied mumbling. The satisfaction is justified; the last two years have been good for Syria and triumphant for its Machiavellian President, Hafez al Assad. Exports are up. Investment,...
Thackeray's Memorials of Defeat
'HE did not invent much, I fancy,' wrote Thackeray in his brief but admiring account of Smollett.(1) The same may be supposed of William Makepeace Thackeray himself, who resembled Smollett both in his minuteness of observation and in his scorn for fiction...
Whither Britain?
IN the not so good old days in Britain a little more than a century ago, almost everyone worked from dawn until dark on the land, in factories and offices, or in the houses of the rich. But when steam engines, telephones and the cinematograph came into...